How to get a bill passed in the uk ? Watch

shanej13
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Hey i was wondering what are the processes of getting a bill passed in uk parliament ? Please be serious as i am trying to do something here and no stupid answers.
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crocker710
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(Original post by shanej13)
Hey i was wondering what are the processes of getting a bill passed in uk parliament ? Please be serious as i am trying to do something here and no stupid answers.
What are you trying to do?
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User237126
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(Original post by crocker710)
What are you trying to do?
Pass a bill in the UK. I thought he made that obvious.
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crocker710
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(Original post by Bobo1234)
Pass a bill in the UK. I thought he made that obvious.
Well thank you for confirming my comprehension skills.

The second sentence says

Please be serious as i am trying to do something here and no stupid answers
I'll reiterate my original question,

What is the subject matter of the bill you're trying to get passed?
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shanej13
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(Original post by crocker710)
What are you trying to do?
Get a bill passed on arms deals with country's with human rights abuse or suspected abuse.
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jesusandtequila
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You should probably stand for Parliament, first.
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shanej13
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(Original post by jesusandtequila)
You should probably stand for Parliament, first.

Im 15 years old so no chance of standing for Parliament
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JammyChoos
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Couldnt you do one of those petition things?
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Will Lucky
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(Original post by shanej13)
Im 15 years old so no chance of standing for Parliament
Well you need to be an MP or a Lord to be able to attempt to get a bill through Parliament.
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jesusandtequila
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(Original post by shanej13)
Im 15 years old so no chance of standing for Parliament
Then you should wait.
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shanej13
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(Original post by Will Lucky)
Well you need to be an MP or a Lord to be able to attempt to get a bill through Parliament.
Could i not get one of them to do it for me ?
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JollyGreenAtheist
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Do you mean personally, or with regard to the whole legislative process?

If personally, your best bet is to either construct an ePetition - 10,000 signatures means the subject has to be discussed in Commons, or to talk to your local MP. With the latter option, results vary between constituencies.

The whole legislative process is boring. A bill is proposed, it's discussed in Commons, signed, discussed in Lords, signed, signed by the PM and given royal assent by the monarch. This can happen up to 3 times. There are more details, but that's the skeletal overview. If you're being cynical, you could perhaps argue that bills are passed depending on whether the PM likes the idea or not, since he has control of the whips.
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shanej13
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(Original post by JollyGreenAtheist)
Do you mean personally, or with regard to the whole legislative process?

If personally, your best bet is to either construct an ePetition - 10,000 signatures means the subject has to be discussed in Commons, or to talk to your local MP. With the latter option, results vary between constituencies.

The whole legislative process is boring. A bill is proposed, it's discussed in Commons, signed, discussed in Lords, signed, signed by the PM and given royal assent by the monarch. This can happen up to 3 times. There are more details, but that's the skeletal overview. If you're being cynical, you could perhaps argue that bills are passed depending on whether the PM likes the idea or not, since he has control of the whips.
ok , would i stand a good chance getting it passed ?
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JollyGreenAtheist
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(Original post by shanej13)
ok , would i stand a good chance getting it passed ?
I'm afraid it is incredibly unlikely.

Your best bet would be to raise awareness about the issue.
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shanej13
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(Original post by JollyGreenAtheist)
I'm afraid it is incredibly unlikely.

Your best bet would be to raise awareness about the issue.
I can't sit here and not do anything , i will fight them if it means me having to give up everything i have
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JollyGreenAtheist
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(Original post by shanej13)
I can't sit here and not do anything , i will fight them if it means me having to give up everything i have
Your motivation is admirable, but an exercise in futility in terms of passing law. As I say, all you can do is raise awareness.

You would face a plethora of major stumbling blocks should you want to pass something. Essentially, passing a bill is performed by Parliament alone, and formulated (predominantly) by the core executive (that is, the PM and senior/relevant Cabinet members).

Perhaps it would be a good idea to write to your local PM and express your concerns. He/She will hopefully direct you to the right pressure group or advise you on how you can make a difference.
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A7d8i6l
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How about you print out a petition from the gov.co.uk. Then all you need to do is get 100,000 signatures and a parliamentary debate will commence on the issue.!!


This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
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Will Lucky
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(Original post by A7d8i6l)
How about you print out a petition from the gov.co.uk. Then all you need to do is get 100,000 signatures and a parliamentary debate will commence on the issue.!!


This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
Yeah but even that is pointless, the government can still effectively dedicate as little time as possible to an issue if it wants to or as much as it wants if it goes in line with its own views/plans.

Ultimately at the end of the day unless you are a member of cabinet and an influential one at that you have no chance of being responsible of getting legislature through.
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gladders
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Lobby your MP.

Lobby the Lords.

Their emails are available on the parliamentary website.

Write to the Government.

Do FoI requests.

Start a local press campaign and/or petition.

Join a sympathetic pressure group and fund/lead/participate in studies to promote your cause.

Send submissions to parliamentary select committees investigating the matter, or if they're not investigating, pressure them to.

Write articles in local and national newspapers.

Conduct publicity campaigns and peaceful protests.

Lobby, lobby, lobby, lobby, lobby. Lobby hard.

There are avenues in which you can influence Parliament. It's a very long and slow process and success is not guaranteed, but this is unavoidable in a democracy of over 60 million people. But utilising every avenue available to you (and there are many) will eventually at the very least get the matter prominent in the media, and from there further successes may follow.

Don't expect it to be easy - nothing ever is. You might be pushing for this for years to come, but if your cause is right and your case is well argued, someone in Parliament will eventually promote it, and if they are successful, the Government may even legislate.

Good luck.
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gladders
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(Original post by Will Lucky)
Yeah but even that is pointless, the government can still effectively dedicate as little time as possible to an issue if it wants to or as much as it wants if it goes in line with its own views/plans.
Not true. The Leader of the House has to constantly negotiate with the opposition parties and the Backbench Business Committee to secure time for the Government's agenda and ensure time for theirs. It's nowhere near as absolute as you cynically claim.

If the Government tried to be as absolute as you claim it would have been thrown out by its own backbenchers months ago.

Ultimately at the end of the day unless you are a member of cabinet and an influential one at that you have no chance of being responsible of getting legislature through.
This is partially true, but it is cynical in the extreme to presume that backbenchers have zero success rate in getting their legislation in. What you will find actually happens is that MPs will pressure the Government to promote their legislation for them. They might draft their own Bill, and if that gets a sympathetic reception from MPs, the Government may commit to laying their own Bill on the subject eventually - and the backbencher will withdraw their own Bill.

The reason for this is that the Government can make adjustments to the Bill to ensure it is fully compatible with Government plans, secure money for it in the Budget, more professionally draft it to avoid loopholes, and allow a minister to be held to account for it.

Backbenchers have a lot more influence than you give them credit for.
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