lup
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Shirley is an avid collector of antique cars. unlike many collectors, however, she doesn't buy them to display, instead, she buys them to drive around. last year, she heard about the death of another car colloector who had a famous 1927 Hispano- Suiza. it was generally accepted in collectors circles as being in perfect condition of any other unalterd vintage car from the time period.

Her and the executor met in the show room, and the executor confirm that it had remained untorched throughout the life of the previous collector. both agreed it appeared to be in almost perfect condition. Shirley wrote a cheque of 300 000 pounds.

When the car arrived at her home the following week she discovered that the car was not at all what it seemed to be. it didn't have an engine. As far as Shirley was concerned, this was not what she had agreed to buy at all. when she called the executor and accused him of misleading her, he said that he had told her all he knew, and although the presence of an engine had not come up when they had originally met. he himself had assumed that the car had a working engine. When Shirley insisted that she should be able to return the car, the executor said sorry, but the sale has been made. you asked to buy the car and i sold it to you for a price we both agrred to.

without the engine, the value of the car would now be closer to 60 000 pounds. Shirley soon discovered that even if there were an engine avilable on the market to complete the car, which there were not, its value as a restore car would remain significantly less than what shirley had paid for it.

Advise Shirley on what her legal options are in relation to purchase.

Thanks in advance.
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What have you done so far? Have you identified the main areas of contract law that are involved?

You will get more out of a question if you have a reasonable go at it first than if you just ask for a model solution without trying it.
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LiveWire2010
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I think this scenario tackles the topic of "misrepresentation".


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Gallabay
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Yeh - misrepresentation but also the defence of caveat emptor, which probably exculpates the seller from liability if they were selling honestly and not attempting to lie to the client.
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