Nessie162
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So I was just wondering. Are calculations learned at Standard Grade, used at Higher level? I'm asking because I never really listened to the teacher when we've done them and I can't remember a thing now. Should I revise them before going into S5 in August?
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TheFOMaster
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(Original post by Nessie162)
So I was just wondering. Are calculations learned at Standard Grade, used at Higher level? I'm asking because I never really listened to the teacher when we've done them and I can't remember a thing now. Should I revise them before going into S5 in August?
I wouldn't bother, a few calculations are reused but your teacher will go over them.
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TheFOMaster
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(Original post by nerd434)
I've delved into the calculations section of my textbook briefly. As far I can tell, it all seems relatively new. If you are even slightly good at Maths you shouldn't have any difficulties with the Standard Grade calculations.
I'm sure every calculation is new. But alot are solved using prior calculations from standard grade Chemistry and Physics. (E.G the n=g/gfm for enthalpy and other calculations)
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Hype en Ecosse
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(Original post by nerd434)
I've delved into the calculations section of my textbook briefly. As far I can tell, it all seems relatively new. If you are even slightly good at Maths you shouldn't have any difficulties with the Standard Grade calculations.
Trust me, you don't even have to be remotely good at maths to do the calculations in Chemistry. The only time being any good at maths helped me in Chemistry was at Advanced Higher, I made sure I could derive 2 formulas from 1, instead of having to remember all three. Which was just because I was lazy and didn't want to memorise 2 other formulas.

People have this strange notion that anything involving numeracy and formulas immediately requires mathematical competence. It doesn't. Even the calculations section of the papers are a test of your ability to interpret chemical data, not your ability to think mathematically. The mathematical ability that you need is S2 algebra; being able to rearrange an equation.

You need your mole formulas from Standard Grade. n = \frac{m}{fm}, n = CV , and as an extension of that one, your formula for "how much needed to neutralise?":  C_1 \times V_1 \times n_H = C_2 \times V_2 \times n_{OH}

I've only seen empirical formula come up once in Higher Chemistry - in multiple choice. It almost always comes up at AH, though.

I doubt you'll need to revise over Summer. It wouldn't hurt to do it a bit, but your teacher will take you through it all again while teaching you the new calculations.
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anthonyfl
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What book is best for higher chemistry? For standard grade I found the brightRED results edition was beneficial.


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