banek
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Hi! I will be studying Materials Science with Engineering and I was wondering - is there any schedule avaiable? I mean, some table with hours, modules, days etc. from previous years? I would like to see with what amount of classes I will have to deal with from September. Many thanks
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Strangey
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(Original post by banek)
Hi! I will be studying Materials Science with Engineering and I was wondering - is there any schedule avaiable? I mean, some table with hours, modules, days etc. from previous years? I would like to see with what amount of classes I will have to deal with from September. Many thanks
I did my undergraduate degree in the school of materials in a very similar degree. I've managed to find the 1st year from last year for the 1st semester. This should give you an example of the type of stuff you'll be expected to do. It's quite intense - several hours of lectures every morning, and then normally 6-9 hours of labs a week.

If you've got any questions, feel free to ask!
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banek
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Thank you so much! So yeah - there are lots of classes, but I think it will be possible to both work and study If I do part-time job should I tell someone about this? Or I should just work below 20h/w and everything will be fine? I was also wondering about some preparation for my course - would you recommend some books (Maths/Physics/Chemistry/Materials) that would be helpful? What did you use during the first semester? Is there kind of a set-book available? Sorry for so many questions but if I want to both study and work it is quite reasonable to grasp some material before the year so I will be able to deal with my course more easily Many thanks!
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Origami Bullets
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There's no point telling the university that you have a job - they're not going to start rearranging lectures because you have a McShift. You need to tell your employer that you have university, and refuse to work when you have lectures. Most universities recommend that you work <16 hours a week. Unfortunately, if you try to work more than that then you will find that you end up with a backlog of work and reading, essay / lab report crises and not enough time for revision when it gets to exam time.
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banek
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This is one of the reasons why I want to start reading/learning right from now and I am looking for books that are used during my course to get a ballance, at least at the 1st semester. I know it will be hard and I can't "just learn" even the most of the modules but the better I will be prepared the less time I will have to spend on revising. So maybe you know some titles worth recommending? And one more question about the jobs - do most student work on working days or weekends?
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Strangey
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(Original post by banek)
Thank you so much! So yeah - there are lots of classes, but I think it will be possible to both work and study If I do part-time job should I tell someone about this? Or I should just work below 20h/w and everything will be fine? I was also wondering about some preparation for my course - would you recommend some books (Maths/Physics/Chemistry/Materials) that would be helpful? What did you use during the first semester? Is there kind of a set-book available? Sorry for so many questions but if I want to both study and work it is quite reasonable to grasp some material before the year so I will be able to deal with my course more easily Many thanks!
It is possible to work and study, yes, but make sure that you're working outside of timetabled hours. As you can see from that timetable I gave you, the mornings are out of the question, and the afternoons can be quite chaotic. Don't agree to shift patterns in the afternoon - it won't work out. There's no need to tell anyone, but you may be asked about it if your work/attendance is suffering.

1st year isn't too difficult at all, it's designed to get everyone to the same level for the most part, and then to give them a good grounding in materials. Materials Science and Engineering by Callister would be a good start if you wanted to read something; it was quite useful in 1st year. Apart from that, there's nothing else really. There are no set books or resources, you've got to find most of it out yourself.
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