Tom747
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Hi all,

At the moment I’m very much at a crossroads with my life. I’m currently 34 years old and am after a career change and more purpose in my life; I am consequently thinking medicine or healthcare (but not radiography).


I have mediocre GCSE grades and A levels (no chem) although I have a First Class degree in Physics (BSc Hons) from a good UK University.


I am currently working as a pilot and have been since leaving University. I have no ties, no children and no morgage. The only healthcare experience was when I cared full- time for my mother who had cancer and was disabled.

I am highly motivated and feel I need to do something other with my life than the sole purpose of earning money or flying bigger aeroplanes. I need to connect with other people and play a small part in society.
I have been thinking about this for a while ( a few years) and need to consider all options and potential careers and applications before making the leap.
Therefore I am after some advice over which Universities look favourably on mature students and any other heathcare professions that I’ve not considered yet.


Thank you,

Tom
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pi=3
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Whoa! You are a pilot?!?! That's so cool - many would say that being a pilot is their dream job! I know a fair few people who want to be pilots and are working in Dentistry just to get the money to fund their Aviation course! Why do you want to go into healthcare all of a sudden?
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digitalis
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(Original post by Tom747)
Hi all,

At the moment I’m very much at a crossroads with my life. I’m currently 34 years old and am after a career change and more purpose in my life; I am consequently thinking medicine or healthcare (but not radiography).


I have mediocre GCSE grades and A levels (no chem) although I have a First Class degree in Physics (BSc Hons) from a good UK University.


I am currently working as a pilot and have been since leaving University. I have no ties, no children and no morgage. The only healthcare experience was when I cared full- time for my mother who had cancer and was disabled.

I am highly motivated and feel I need to do something other with my life than the sole purpose of earning money or flying bigger aeroplanes. I need to connect with other people and play a small part in society.
I have been thinking about this for a while ( a few years) and need to consider all options and potential careers and applications before making the leap.
Therefore I am after some advice over which Universities look favourably on mature students and any other heathcare professions that I’ve not considered yet.


Thank you,

Tom
Trade? I always wanted to be a pilot!! No jokes. What do you fly?
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Tom747
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I am a Captain on a business jet for a charter company. I have no life, pretty much on call 24-7.

However, I feel I need to do something more worthwhile with my life. Does that sound crazy? Yes I get paid well although theres more things in life than money. When I come to retire I need to have felt that I have played a small part in society, flying doesn't allow me nor does it provide me with any satisfaction these days.
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.eXe
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I would trade medicine for your career in a second. The thought of getting to travel that much makes my eyes tear up with joy

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probably not, but being a pilot sounds pretty fking amazing in my books
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Tom747
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The grass isn't always greener! There are numerous times when all I've done is spent 8 hours in a hotel before leaving again. I don't intend to give up flying all together. I also have an instructors rating on light aircraft, that I can maybe use on the odd weekend day.
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.eXe
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In response to your question, I don't really have a specific answer. What I can tell you is each school considers applications on the applicant's individual merits and being a mid-30 year old in medical school isn't a big deal or highly unusual. It all comes down to how you present yourself in the PS. Since you have a lot of unrelated experience, a particular thing will be to make that experience apply to medicine.

At the end of the day, schools are just looking for suitable candidates, rather than picking and choosing based on some personal biases.
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Tom747
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Thanks exe.

I also need to consider other occupations in the NHS. I do fancy medical school though.
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Zedd
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If I were you I'd start to save up some money to keep you afloat and get some work experience with a hospital while you apply to GEPs. In the mean time you might want to start researching medical schools and arranging that work experience/shadowing as it can take a few months to get arranged.
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Tom747
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I know its difficult to say, but what kind of personal financial costs are involved? I understand most Grad courses are funded from years 2-4. What would be say a ball park figure, moderate living etc per year?
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theatrical
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(Original post by Tom747)
Therefore I am after some advice over which Universities look favourably on mature students and any other heathcare professions that I’ve not considered yet.
If I were you I'd email all the medical schools you're interested in with a full academic CV and ask them for their advice. They'll be honest with you regarding your chances and anything you need to do to make an application acceptable/competitve.

As regards finances; tuition isn't anything to worry about on the 4 year courses, however it's £9000 per year (payable up-front for those who already have a degree) on the 5 year courses. For rent I've paid between £300-430 per month (in Manchester) throughout my course. I'm sure you can figure out the cost of food/bills/socialising/petrol yourself.
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Tom747
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Really so I'm right in thinking that on a GEP 4 year course tuition is paid for during years 2 - 4; I would need to find 9k for the first year. However for all 5 year courses its 9k a year?

Thanks
Tom
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Anna1988
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Hi Tom747, basically as things stand right now you would get your tuition paid years 2-4 on a GEP course (partly by the NHS and partly by getting a student loan from student finance). You would also get a NHS bursary and a student finance maintenance loan. In year 1 of a 4-year course, you have to pay about £3500 and the rest comes from a student loan. You also get a maintenance loan in year 1 but nothing from the NHS. On a 5 year course, you have to pay £9k/year for years 1-4 (you do still get a maintenance loan should you want it) but in year 5, you get your tuition paid by NHS+student loan again. Remember that you will start paying back all the student loan and maintenance loans you get from SFE(student finance England) when you start earning in your F1 year.I believe these arrangement will stay for at least the next two years but may or may not change after that. It's all quite confusing but I hope this has helped!
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sweetchilli
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(Original post by Tom747)
I have mediocre GCSE grades and A levels (no chem) although I have a First Class degree in Physics (BSc Hons) from a good UK University.

... The only healthcare experience was when I cared full- time for my mother who had cancer and was disabled.


... Therefore I am after some advice over which Universities look favourably on mature students and any other heathcare professions that I’ve not considered yet.
You need to do some research on med schools that would look only at your 1st in physics. The medicine pages here are pretty good for working out which unis would consider you.

Did you do any chemistry in your degree? Think you may need to do an A level if none as most look for that kind of level. I had chemistry in my Biology degree and had done enough for that to be sufficient.

You have to apply all your work experience/skill set to how it would fit into a medical career. I did this in my PS - computing was my previous career. Had no healthcare related work experience but had done 3 years volunteer work as a golf coach for youngsters. In your Ps, make the most of the fact you cared for your mum full-time.

As for GEP versus undergrad that may be down to finances. I chose undergrad as have 3 y.o. and thought 2 years in one would be a big ask with a toddler, wanted to remain in Scotland (partner's job) and as Scottish did get a little help with fees from SAAS plus fees < £3k p.a. for me.

If you need any more help or encouragement, feel free to pm me. BTW I'm the other side of 40 so you are but a youngster at 34!

Good luck with everything!
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aggie30
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Being a pilot does make a difference to peoples lives every time you land a plane full of passengers home safely you have made a difference just saying. Make sure that medicine is what your really want to do because believe me its so hard to get into. I'm struggling as it Is and I have good GCSE's and hopefully I'll get the Alevel grades needed. But I think if you want to do it for the right and realistic reasons and your willing to work your hardest and have some luck on your side. Research what you need to do and defiantly try and get some work experience or voluntary work.
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adsyrah
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Tom, you're in a great position to do GEP.

You've got a good degree and for some med school that's all you need (barring UKCAT / GAMSAT).

Have a look at this link:

http://www.medschoolsonline.co.uk/index.php?pageid=11

It gives you an overview of which schools don't look at A-Levels for Chemistry and what the entry requirements re. your degree.

Off the top of my head, you'll be able to apply to the same 4 unis I did last year - Newcastle, Warwick, King's and Southampton. There may be more if you've got A-Level biology.

If you're wanting a career change and are seriously thinking about medicine (which you are by virtue of posting on this forum) then I'd say go for it. No point regretting not at least appying to see if you get a place. If you have a change of heart over the next few months, you can always withdraw your application from UCAS.

As for finance - unless you can afford the £36k it'll cost in tuition fees for the 5 year courses, then GEP is the way forward for you. You'll need to pay £3645 yourself in year 1, but there's financial support via student finance for the rest of the fees.

Any questiosn, feel free to PM me.
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Tom747
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Thank you for all your posts.

Yes I am interested in medicine although I wouldn't totally rule out some other clinical profession, not particularly interested in radiography despite my Physics degree. Also being a pilot (answering aggie's post) I am aware that some of the people I fly are creating a difference somewhere, but the reasons I want to change are numerous. Firstly I have always been interested in medicine and its the best application of Science there is, imho. Further, my personal experiences with my mum, I have also achieved what I have set out to in aviation, the only progression is bigger aeroplanes, this does not equate to requiring more skill please note! Also making a small difference on a daily basis to society, and interacting with people.
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polldoll
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As you say there are loads of other healthcare professions to consider. To make a difference at a level people see and appreciate I immediately think physiotherapy or nursing??
Nursing is all about helping people and making a difference to them. You spend more time with the patients than a doctor, you administer the treatments that have been prescribed, and assist them with all their needs. It's not for everyone, but it's a great career. The degree is funded if money was ever an issue.

Physio also let's you work with the patients and make a physical difference. You help them learn to walk, adapt to changes, and get them as independent as possible so that they can live a full life.

Both careers that you should look into further as well as researching medicine!
Pm for any advice!
Px


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polldoll
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Oh and like your user name.. Good planes! :0)


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Tom747
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Thanks guys. I haven't ruled out nursing or training to be an occupational theapist.
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