ergo30
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Anyone here have a good cadet experience, I'm interested in joining cadets, ACF or CCF but i have no idea what cadets requires. Is cadets also useful to put on your CV? I'm still only in year 9 and I have heard it is quite fun. So what's Cadets all about?
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Johnmatthews
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Brain washing, to answer your last question.
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ergo30
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(Original post by Johnmatthews)
Brain washing, to answer your last question.
errrm? :confused:
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President Snow
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Some people really hate the Cadets. In fact, most people probably do. But I really liked it. There is no middle ground, it is either a love or hate thing.

They will expect good discipline. If you are not the sort of person who is able to do exactly as told, immediately, if you are not the sort of person who is able to knuckle down to the boring stuff, who is able to stick out the marching practice, or who is so scared of the sight of a bit of mud, then it really isn't right for you.

Initially, it may be a little boring. They have to start somewhere, and generally standing and practicing drill (marching and the like) is what happens. However, if you stick it out, it gets really good.

Eventually, maybe a year or two into it, you will be out in the field, creating amazing shelters, shooting live rounds on the range, blank rounds in amazing overnight exercises, maybe on the laser ranges, assault courses, military tactics classes, on real army bases, etc. Some of those depend on the exact setup of the CCF or ACF you have there, but most will do far more than you would ever imagine.

As for the CV, initially, it isn't especially useful. However, if you become an NCO (a year stuck in a classroom being taught how to teach younger children, which isn't particularly interesting, but leads to more interesting things), and then you get to go out into the field, and teach the younger, new, cadets how to march and the like. This is good for a CV or university application.

I have made this out quite negatively. In reality, I thoroughly enjoyed it, and they organised loads of really, really cool stuff. But there will be boring bits, and some people simply aren't willing to stick these out.

But if it still appeals to you after reading the above post, then it definitely is right for you, and you should enjoy it tremendously, and you should get loads out of it.

I have done it for many years, and should be able to answer most questions you have.

Richard
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President Snow
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(Original post by ergo30)
Hi, I'm still interested in cadets. I'm going to start cadets in year 10, can you tell please tell me what cadets is like?


Thanks
Help really appreciated
Hello again

I am glad that you are still interested. I don't know exactly how your school runs things, you will need to find out, but I will give you a flavour for how my school does things.

We have a 1 hour period a week allocated to the CCF. In addition, we have 5 whole day "field days". Finally, we have optional 5 day - 1 weeks holiday camps.

In the period sessions, we are taught something new. Each skill gets two weeks, before we move onto something else. Some of the things we do are:

Shooting on the school's range.

Indoor rock climbing at a centre nearby.

Map reading and compass work.

Learning how to shoot a rifle (shooting, loading and unloading, stoppages, handing over, making safe, etc. These get a test (retake until you pass, usually), and you are re-tested every 6 months. You shoot live rounds from these rifles on real ranges on field days, so they are SO hot on safety. A single mistake could kill someone (e.g. you don't unload it properly). They will tolerate 0 messing around with weapons.

Cleaning weapons.

How to tackle assault courses.

How to make fires and build shelters.

How to make snares and carve knives.

How to maintain uniform (POLISH on boots!!)

Military tactics.

Hand signals.

Marching.

Marching with weapons.

More marching.




The list goes on. There are some boring parts, but the majority of it is really good fun.

Field days. These are whole day (sometimes overnight also) events. Usually, we arrive, get shown to our area, and have to build a shelter, and collect logs and the like. The teachers will always be very nearby, to watch for dangerous mistakes, and so you can ask questions. Then we have to set up a watch schedule. T

First, you cook over small fires, and have dinner. Then the teachers might take you on a night time patrol. They will show you where to go, what to look for, what to do, etc. You are never left without instruction.

You arrive back, are just making yourself comfortable, when ATTACK!!! Scramble to positions, grab weapons, etc. Attack pauses whilst health and safety officer makes sure everything is safe...pause...pause...RESUME ATTACK!!! Teachers charge. You shoot off a bunch of blank ammo, making loads of noise, and having a great time. Attack defeated.

Good nights rest. Teacher slips round and gives you ammo (health and safety means you can't keep any on you now). When you get ammo, it means...ATTACK! More awesome shooting. Spend the rest of the day bugging out, performing patrols, getting attacked, flinging yourself into a ditch, reading maps, etc. etc.

For me, they are great fun

Finally, the summer camps. These are subsidised, and are usually really cheap (~£100 for a whole 5 days - food, activities, accomodation, etc.)

The accommodation will be basic army fare, but is perfectly good. You will be with a bunch of good mates anyway. The food is perfectly good too. The activities usually include one overnight exercise, shooting live rounds on a range, simulated rounds on a laser range, building shelters, digging holes and bunkers, orienteering, cinema, go-carts, etc.

They are usually optional, but great fun.

Does it sound as though it may appeal? Yes, there are boring parts, and I don't particularly enjoy marching, or parading in the cold, wind, and wet, and snow, but there are also lots of good parts. Please feel free to ask any more questions you may have

Richard
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ct2k7
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I was in it, and I loved it. Great outdoors experience, and I did few things which I wouldn't have dreamt or doing otherwise.
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ocelot92
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I spent 2 years in the RAF, finally achieved Lance corporal. It was crap at the start but slowly got used to it - its basically marching and preparing for competitions and 'flight recognition', loads of expeditions (in conjunction with DofE), and you have to be immaculate for the inspections and reviews - I was forced into being a 'Guard of Honour'.

I actually skived the last 5 sessions of my school, since there were so many people - they actually did not tell me off, and yet I still got promoted...interesting.

I would say its good if your tough, and can withstand being told off often by this seargant guy - I simply quitted it because I wanted to do other things for medicine.

Its very nice for you CV, but I would encourage you to be an RAF cadet - its much more gentle than the army people (handling guns) and you get praise and promotions purely from aircraft recognition (sitting in a warm room in winter whilst the army cadets are doing assault courses) and looking through slides with a fellow NCO - we dossed about so much to be honest. :cool:
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ct2k7
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(Original post by ocelot92)
I spent 2 years in the RAF, finally achieved Lance corporal. It was crap at the start but slowly got used to it - its basically marching and preparing for competitions and 'flight recognition', loads of expeditions (in conjunction with DofE), and you have to be immaculate for the inspections and reviews - I was forced into being a 'Guard of Honour'.

I actually skived the last 5 sessions of my school, since there were so many people - they actually did not tell me off, and yet I still got promoted...interesting.

I would say its good if your tough, and can withstand being told off often by this seargant guy - I simply quitted it because I wanted to do other things for medicine.

Its very nice for you CV, but I would encourage you to be an RAF cadet - its much more gentle than the army people (handling guns) and you get praise and promotions purely from aircraft recognition (sitting in a warm room in winter whilst the army cadets are doing assault courses) and looking through slides with a fellow NCO - we dossed about so much to be honest. :cool:
The RAF doesn't have a Lance Corporal rank, (neither CCF or ATC), or even NCO.
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Clare~Bear
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Did you join in the end OP. A lot of marching isn't it?

I went to the sea cadets.

They're quite strict, but you do learn a lot of skills. Plus with stuff liek brownies or guides you decorated one cake and got a cooking badge! With cadets we had to actually work for our badges. And where possible they did them with professional organisations such as RYA for boating and st johns ambulance for first aid, so your qualifications actually mean something in the real world.
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Clare~Bear
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(Original post by ct2k7)
The RAF doesn't have a Lance Corporal rank, (neither CCF or ATC), or even NCO.
Aren't most of the instructors NCOs, they were at SCC. but the person you quoted seemed like he was only a cadet so :dontknow:
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ocelot92
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(Original post by ct2k7)
The RAF doesn't have a Lance Corporal rank, (neither CCF or ATC), or even NCO.
Yes it does look on wikipedia:
The RAF sections of Combined Cadet Forces, seen in some British schools, use the rank of cadet lance corporal (cadet junior corporal pre-2012) for many years in order that NCOs can be ranked on parity with the cadet lance corporals in the army sections.
Sorry mate but you should probably find out about things before you try to talk about them, have you ever heard of 'reading'? You should try it out.
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ct2k7
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(Original post by ocelot92)
Yes it does look on wikipedia:

Sorry mate but you should probably find out about things before you try to talk about them, have you ever heard of 'reading'? You should try it out.
Ours didn't, nor did any of the contingencies that I had come across.

That said, we had Junior Corporals, to maintain the parity, but not Lance Corporals, in fact, when we had our last inspection, I met Air. Commadore Barbara Cooper, we actually talked about ranks, and she was freely using the term Junior Corporals over Lance corporals.

ACP 31, which isn't used anymore but also the Administrative ACPs refer to Junior Corporals, and do not list Lance Corporals as a recognised RAF/CCF rank.
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ct2k7
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(Original post by Clare~Bear)
Aren't most of the instructors NCOs, they were at SCC. but the person you quoted seemed like he was only a cadet so :dontknow:
Most instructors were NCOs, I'm going to be doing my IOT next year at Cranwell. As it was a school CCF, there were staff officers who assisted instructors, but overall, instructors were NCOs.
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Terence_A.
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(Original post by ergo30)
Anyone here have a good cadet experience, I'm interested in joining cadets, ACF or CCF but i have no idea what cadets requires. Is cadets also useful to put on your CV? I'm still only in year 9 and I have heard it is quite fun. So what's Cadets all about?
Well,

I was in ATC for a number of years. Some of the experiences I had were:

- Free flying lessons
- D of E
- Rock Climbing
- Shooting team
- Living on a working air base for a week (awsome)
- Diving
-Make friends
-Learning (you are required to study a fair bit &take exams)

.....and A LOT more.

Downsides:

-Takes up time
-Most of the time is learning, drilling and being bossed about (until you get a rank) which can be V boring
- You have to spend stupid time looking after your uniform and shoes (if your sqn is any good)
- somtimes you can get stick.

......and A LOT more.

The best piece of advice I can give you is to make sure you research and join a good sqn as quality varies hugely between then. In a bad sqn you never do activities and the staff are ***t, however, a really good sqn can be like having a part-time job because they require that much effort, and they're like family. All in all I'd say it is deffo worth it, especially if you want a career in the armed forces. They do, however, promote a very specific attitude towards the forces that I feel was wrong and the other cadets can glorify war a bit, so be very weary. I'm pretty left-wing and didn't agree with some of the things they taught to teenagers. I left because I wanted to gow my hair lol (regret nothing). It is stil worth it though just for some of the really great activities and skills you can learn (I got btechs and all sorts, and I wasn't there for that long, really)

Hope this helps.
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martin jol
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i did it through school, which probably meant the people were more normal and i could do it with my mates. cause we were forced to do it some hated it, but i liked it - more for the outdoor skills and time with friends than any army aspect of it. i'd recommend it.
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ocelot92
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(Original post by ct2k7)
Most instructors were NCOs, I'm going to be doing my IOT next year at Cranwell. As it was a school CCF, there were staff officers who assisted instructors, but overall, instructors were NCOs.
yeah yeah yeah
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ct2k7
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(Original post by ocelot92)
yeah yeah yeah
You haven't provided a rebuttal to a document stipulating my case from HQAQ.
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ergo30
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(Original post by ocelot92)
I spent 2 years in the RAF, finally achieved Lance corporal. It was crap at the start but slowly got used to it - its basically marching and preparing for competitions and 'flight recognition', loads of expeditions (in conjunction with DofE), and you have to be immaculate for the inspections and reviews - I was forced into being a 'Guard of Honour'.

I actually skived the last 5 sessions of my school, since there were so many people - they actually did not tell me off, and yet I still got promoted...interesting.

I would say its good if your tough, and can withstand being told off often by this seargant guy - I simply quitted it because I wanted to do other things for medicine.

Its very nice for you CV, but I would encourage you to be an RAF cadet - its much more gentle than the army people (handling guns) and you get praise and promotions purely from aircraft recognition (sitting in a warm room in winter whilst the army cadets are doing assault courses) and looking through slides with a fellow NCO - we dossed about so much to be honest. :cool:

I would join RAF but I'm not too good with heights. :rolleyes:
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Ceiti
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I've just left the ACF after 3 years (going to uni). Fair enough, some of it was boring (mainly drill and having to sit through at least 3 million lessons on 6 figure grid references) but the stuff I did for 3 and 4 star training (massive night ambushes and section/platoon attacks, adventure training in Scotland and Switerland, Gold DofE, sports leader) was pretty awesome. Provided lots of interesting stuff (examples of leadership etc.) to talk about in medicine interviews too.
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0907714
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The Cadet organisations are great for a number of things. I don't think there are many drawbacks to joining the cadets unless you are not prepared to work hard at improving yourself and helping others achieve goals. I think it will make you a better person. It is great organisation to join at such a young age.

I was in the Air Cadets for 4 years and reached the rank of Cadet Sergeant. I started out like everyone else without a clue, but there was something that sparked when I joined the cadets and the officers at the squadron noticed the potential that I had (before I did! This is why cadets is beneficial, not everyone will do well but you never know!). I soon found out I liked to work to learn new things and trusted the officers and the organisation to help me grow professionally. This is great to learn: the work hard, play hard attitude. The harder you work and longer you stay, the more experiences you can push yourself into and learn new things and push you out of your comfort zone making your heart jump. Beginning to understand teamwork, leadership and communication skills. There is so much to take advantage of if you commit to putting in the work to help yourself. Its a time investment and a small cash investment in yourself for now and your future.

In the air cadets I done the following with my 4 years: Flew more than 15 times in a small 'tutor' plane doing aerobatics with an instructor, flew in various other helicopters and one small jet. I learned how to shoot 5 types of guns, shot at 20 metres, 300 metres and at clay pigeon with a shotgun I learned first aid and led a small team in several occasions in practice scenarios. I improved my swimming technique. I improved my overall fitness and played many types of sports I had never played. I met hundreds of new like minded people, and loads of weird people! (its great to get used to meeting different types of people) I actually realised I had some leadership skills and other skills I would never of found at such an early age because of the range of activities and staff to help you do well.

I marched a lot, and got really good at it. I constantly had the best uniform because I cared a lot about this. Both of these are really hard work to perfect. We spent a lot of time volunteering and fundraising for charities and our squadron. I spent times bored in some activities I wasn't interested in, but think about what you'd miss by not joining. Infact I cared so much about cadets it quickly consumed my life and it really made me who I am today.

Watch out not to become consumed by the cadets and armed forces lifestyle and join the armed forces without thinking about what you will really have to do.

I went to uni and joined the University Air Squadron too, but within months I soon thought a lot about war. I was chasing the pilot career and that's all I cared about (a good and bad thing, good because it got me close to getting there, bad because it narrowed my options about applying for other roles), but I decided I didn't want to be part of the armed forces at all because of war. I read enough books and seen enough films to realise that war is a bloody mess. It is the ultimate sacrifice, the only thing that would motivate me to make such a sacrifice would be if my family were affected by war. I'd soon run out my house with a suit and tie into that interview office and sign up to any position I could get to help. That would motivate me to pull the trigger, on a fast jet or on an assault rifle. But I digress. Keep an open mind and think about what you are capable of and what you care about. This is just me though maybe you might think differently and will decide to sacrifice your life, or help those to do so, for the country and for the greater good in different countries for all. I have so much respect for people in the armed forces.

These organisations are run by there parent armed forces services: the army, air force and navy. One of the reasons these organisations are in place is to help people see what life could be like if you join the armed forces. Its totally up to you whether you want to join or not. THERE IS NO PRESSURE TO JOIN!!! Infact in my squadron only one person out of 20 joined the armed forces afterwards.

I suggest you do join and see what you think. You will have to meet new people or maybe be surprised that you know a few people from your school already, I had no idea that some people I knew were in the cadets. I have been in work for 2 years now and in no way would I have improved so much if I hadn't been in cadets. The training and opportunities aren't as easily available as in the cadets. You get out what you put in.
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