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    My aunt's a professor. She wrote a couple of books and stuff. The president gave the little certificate thing to her. It might be different in Poland but I think that it's quite hard to be a professor.
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    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    The route to professorship

    Masters is in some subjects optional
    PhD

    The route here splits between lecturing and research posts

    Lecturing posts:

    Lecturer (starting salary £23k)
    Senior Lecturer/Reader (lowest salary £36.5k, highest £44.5k)
    Professor

    Research posts:
    Research Assistant (starting salary £19k)
    Junior Research Fellow (about £22k)
    Research Fellow (between £25 and £28k)
    Senior Research Fellow (btwn £26 and £45k)
    Research Professor
    The pays not that bad - what do they keep complaining about?
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    Some prof'ships are also honorary, and are not linked to a University Chair.
    The youngest Prof I know is 32 (made prof at 30), good looking, but is a terrible bore . Which is nice, 'cos I hate perfect people! I like the odd flaw!
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    (Original post by Butterfly)
    I think doing a phD simply because you don't want to be called 'Mr.' is very vain. Have you any idea how much work goes into a phD? To succeed I'd imagine you need to be in it for the right reasons, i.e. having a passion for the particular subject area, wanting experience of research...etc.

    a close friend is doing his phd just because he liked the idea of being "above" everyone else and being called dr achieved this.

    although i do like the idea of being able to say...oh my boyfriend is a dr.

    but a dr in sport science aint exactly something to boast about!

    love Katy ***
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    (Original post by ickle_katy)
    but a dr in sport science aint exactly something to boast about!

    love Katy ***
    I think you're wrong there! It would undoubtably involve a shite load of biochemistry, physiology and pharmacology/pharmacokinetics!
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    I think you're wrong there! It would undoubtably involve a shite load of biochemistry, physiology and pharmacology/pharmacokinetics!

    nope, it involves playing an awful lot of golf....and going to watch people play golf. oh and playing computer games all day in the office!!

    and then working his arse off the night before somethings due in!

    love Katy ***
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    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    It's better (if you're good) in the US - and in industry.

    And they resent that often the librarians and administrators are paid similar wages.

    Getting from research assistant onto the snr fellow scale is very tricky - as is getting from lecturer to snr lecturer.

    Progression is easier for those who can teach as well as produce good research (ie can follow the lecturer scale rather than the research scale) but lecturers get less respect than pure researchers...daft
    Erm it is when you consider the amount of work taken to get there. Teachers complain about pay, they start on about 19k. Assuming they go straight from school to university - do a 3 year degree then 1 year teacher training then they'll be 22 and on 19k. In my subject its not easy to get a lectureship immediately after doing a PhD, most people become a JRF. Assuming your prospective lecturer goes straight from school to uni, then does a 4 year degree/3 year+1 year masters, then 3 years for a PhD then they'll be starting on about 19k aged 25 (or will have lost out on 60k potential earnings). Put it another way, I left industry to come back and do a PhD with the purpose of becoming an academic - if everything goes well I'll be on the same salary as when I left industry aged 24 when I'm about 30-35
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    (Original post by ickle_katy)
    nope, it involves playing an awful lot of golf....and going to watch people play golf. oh and playing computer games all day in the office!!

    and then working his arse off the night before somethings due in!

    love Katy ***
    [email protected]@rd! I sweated blood for at least 2 years over mine (not sports science though!).

    A friend of a friend of mine is doing a sports based PhD in Loughbourgh, and it's very scientific, which they said they were struggling with (he admits his first degree was basically in playing rugby and drinking!)

    Mental note for next life: If I'm stupid enough to do a doctorate again remember sports science
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    I'm thinking about that sort of career too... The thought of being Dr. (mylastname) is very appealing as well, I have to admit.

    This is a slightly silly question.. but do female doctors who marry tend to keep their own names or take their husbands'?
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    (Original post by F. Poste)
    I'm thinking about that sort of career too... The thought of being Dr. (mylastname) is very appealing as well, I have to admit.

    This is a slightly silly question.. but do female doctors who marry tend to keep their own names or take their husbands'?
    My DoS took her husbands name but I have seen lady docs keep their names as well particularly if the husband is also a doc.
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    (Original post by shiny)
    My DoS took her husbands name but I have seen lady docs keep their names as well particularly if the husband is also a doc.
    It's usually for continuity re: publications and the like.

    I know several female post-docs who are Dr Maiden Name but also use Mrs Married Name. I will keep my surname for professional reasons when me and my other half marry.
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    I could be wrong here but in the US I think what we would call lecturers are known as professors, so maybe easier to get a job in the US than do a pHD.
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    (Original post by sashh)
    I could be wrong here but in the US I think what we would call lecturers are known as professors, so maybe easier to get a job in the US than do a pHD.
    In the vast majority of universities throughout the world you would be expected to have done a PhD before you were appointed as a lecturer/professor.
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    (Original post by sashh)
    I could be wrong here but in the US I think what we would call lecturers are known as professors, so maybe easier to get a job in the US than do a pHD.
    US : UK
    Assistant Professor : Lecturer
    Associate Profesor : Reader
    Professor : Professor

    Lecturer : Junior Lecturer / Part time lecturer - usually without a PhD

    You won't find a job as a professor (or at least a tenure-track professor) in the US without a PhD. You could find a job as a lecturer, but that isn't the same thing as a lecturer in the UK.
 
 
 
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