Biological/Chemistry degrees/careers have no connection to animal testing. Watch

Worms
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#1
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I wanted to study microbiology or medicine/biomedical science, but my careers adviser said that if I were to study in this area, in my career or degree I may have to test on animals, and I am 1billion% against testing on live animals.

What other areas could I study that would be related to health science/biology and maybe a little bit of chemistry, that I would never have to test on animals or deal with people who test on animals.

Thank you :bunny:
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shanghaichica
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There are areas of these fields where you will never have to test on animals. I don't know what area you plan to go into after you graduate but even if you went into research you could avoid testing on animals depending on the nature of the specific projects that you work on. As for dealing with people who test on animals that would be a bit trickier. I worked in scientific research for 4 years before changing careers and I never tested on animals or came remotley close to doing it.
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IFondledAGibbon
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(Original post by Worms)
I wanted to study microbiology or medicine/biomedical science, but my careers adviser said that if I were to study in this area, in my career or degree I may have to test on animals, and I am 1billion% against testing on live animals.

What other areas could I study that would be related to health science/biology and maybe a little bit of chemistry, that I would never have to test on animals or deal with people who test on animals.

Thank you :bunny:
Animal testing is a vital part of scientific experimentation in the biological sciences. Many people who study biology go into disease research and drug development which would inevitability involve animal testing. So as a biology student, you'd be dealing with people who do test on animals and people who want to test on animals, it's inevitable.

However, I think it would be perfectly possible to study microbiology or biomedical sciences without ever testing on live animals yourself. It may be difficult to avoid experimentation with dead animals who've been killed for such a purpose. Although, I'm sure they'd understand if you opted out of such an experiment. I'm in my second year of a biomed degree and I've only ever conducted experiments with dead fish, microorganisms and Guinea Pig muscle (the animal had been killed and dissected first obviously).

In terms of careers there are hundreds of jobs that wouldn't involve animal testing, jobs in the NHS for example. Furthermore, not all biomedical research requires testing on animals, so it's still possible to go down that route if you wanted.

I'm curious as to why you're so against it. I'm a vegetarian and someone who tries to avoid unnecessary animal harm, however a ban on animal testing would result in thousands of treatments for disease undiscovered and untested.
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IFondledAGibbon
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(Original post by Worms)
Thank you for your advice.

I agree with animal testing in some aspects eg seeing if the climate an animal lives in affects their eyesight (experiments that don't involve animals in labs), however I am completely against it if it reduces that quality of life of the animal, causes them stress, pain ect. or if the animals are bred simply to be tested on and then killed.

Additionally, I know they help millions of people blah blah blah, however IMO I believe that the life of a mouse is just as valuable as a life of a human, I don't want to directly be the cause of death/pain of anything, human, insect, rat...
Why is the life of a mouse equal to the life of a human? Is the life of an unborn fetus equal to the life of a human? Is the life on an insect equal to the life of a mouse? What about plants, fungi or bacteria?

Most people tend to arbitrarily place humans above all else based on vague ideas regarding intelligence or suffering, without realising that some humans are less intelligent and less able to suffer than some animals. However, granting all animals or all mammals the same moral worth IMO is equally arbitrary.
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falks941
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I study Biomedical Sciences and am currently studying at Southampton university. Here, with regard to practical experiments, they give students a form that covers EVERYTHING we would need for the laboratory-based work, and one of items on the form asked us to sign if we weren't comfortable doing experiments involving animals, and it stated that any animals used were not affected by the experiments. If you signed this, they would give you a slightly different experiment of equal weighting in terms of marks. I'd imagine a lot of universities do this
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barwen
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You should be tested on. Perhaps we could then find out why some humans are void of compassion and have a liking for pain and suffering of innocent animals. No animal should suffer or die for human health Murderer.
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barwen
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(Original post by IFondledAGibbon)
Animal testing is a vital part of scientific experimentation in the biological sciences. Many people who study biology go into disease research and drug development which would inevitability involve animal testing. So as a biology student, you'd be dealing with people who do test on animals and people who want to test on animals, it's inevitable.

However, I think it would be perfectly possible to study microbiology or biomedical sciences without ever testing on live animals yourself. It may be difficult to avoid experimentation with dead animals who've been killed for such a purpose. Although, I'm sure they'd understand if you opted out of such an experiment. I'm in my second year of a biomed degree and I've only ever conducted experiments with dead fish, microorganisms and Guinea Pig muscle (the animal had been killed and dissected first obviously).

In terms of careers there are hundreds of jobs that wouldn't involve animal testing, jobs in the NHS for example. Furthermore, not all biomedical research requires testing on animals, so it's still possible to go down that route if you wanted.

I'm curious as to why you're so against it. I'm a vegetarian and someone who tries to avoid unnecessary animal harm, however a ban on animal testing would result in thousands of treatments for disease undiscovered and untested.
You should be tested on. Perhaps we could then find out why some humans are void of compassion and have a liking for pain and suffering of innocent animals. No animal should suffer or die for human health Murderer.
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IFondledAGibbon
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(Original post by barwen)
You should be tested on. Perhaps we could then find out why some humans are void of compassion and have a liking for pain and suffering of innocent animals. No animal should suffer or die for human health Murderer.
I haven't posted on TSR since this thread and this is what I find, ha.

Take this hypothetical: if there was a hospital fire and you only had time to save either the hospital cat, a human patient, or a lab rat, which would you chose? On what criteria would you base the decision?

You have to look at what makes life valuable - capacity to suffer physically and emotionally, perception of the self, personhood etc. Clearly, some living things are more valuable than others.

If we didn't test on animals, modern medicine wouldn't work. Many millions of people would suffer from diseases we could have found cures and treatments for. In my opinion, the pain and suffering that people would endure outweighs the suffering inflicted on animals.

But that doesn't mean the animals aren't worthy or moral consideration. I still think eating meat is mostly wrong, I think testing on great apes is almost always wrong, but we really need animal testing for medicine.

And researchers do their best to prevent unnecessary animal suffering with the "3 R's".
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