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    Could sum1 pls give me a quick rundown on what you do in a titration. And also whay equipment is involved. I would be very grateful...Thnx
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    (Original post by lgs98jonee)
    Could sum1 pls give me a quick rundown on what you do in a titration. And also whay equipment is involved. I would be very grateful...Thnx
    I wish i could remember - i did it in December, too long ago for me. All i remember was it was a horrible experience since i'd never used the equipment before and was being assessed on that as real practical good thing i didn't break anything
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    Ah, titrations. I've done about 100 since September!


    Could sum1 pls give me a quick rundown on what you do in a titration. And also whay equipment is involved. I would be very grateful...Thnx

    Basically, if you're trying to find. for exapmle, the concentration of an acid, HCl, you use a standard solution of an alkali.

    Measure very carefully a very accurate amount of the acid into a beaker using a pipette.
    Add the alkali gradually, using a burette, until the neutralisation reaction is complete (using an indicator, usually phenolphthalien or methyl orange).
    Repeat this a few times to get an average.

    Work out how many moles of the alkali you have used.
    Eg 25cm^3 of 0.1M NaOH

    No. of moles= conc.*vol. = 0.1*0.025=2.5*10^-3moles

    Using equation OH- + H+ ---> H20
    So there is a 1:1 mole ratio
    therefore you have an equal no. of moles of HCl, 2.5*10^-3

    If you used 50cm^3 of HCl, then you can work out the concentration.

    Conc.= no. of moles/vol. = 2.5*10^-3/0.05 = 0.05M

    Additional things:
    Best to first wash out the glassware with distilled water, and then the burette and pipette with whatever you are puting in them.
    Generally, you repeat the titration you repeat the titrations until you have 2 the same, or within 0.5cm^3 of each other, and calculate the average using only these 2.
    When using a starch indicator with the iodine titrations, make sure you add the starch near the end point; this stops a precipitate forming.

    This is all I can think of at the moment, it's just the basic idea. Hope it helps.
 
 
 

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