How hard are Swedish universities to get into? Watch

markusmerkus
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#1
Currently have my heart set on studying for a Political Science, or a relevant title, MA at a Swedish University. This is largely down to the free cost of tuition and the idea of a new adventure which could "spice up" my CV.

Having looked into the prospect and contacted the relevant departments i'm still none the wiser as to how likely I am to be accepted.

The main issue being despite being a capable student, a mixture of wrong modular choices and one half of my joint honour degree letting me down, meant I only achieved a high 2:2 in my second year despite a stable 2:1 average in the Politics aspect of my course.

I am fully confident I will graduate with a strong 2:1 overall but wondered how likely an institution like Lund, Gothenburg or Stockholm would be to accept me on my current grades or whether they're likely to be make a conditional offer anyway?

Anyone with any previous experience would be greatly appreciated in this thread.
2
reply
PaintingJupiter
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 years ago
#2
Hi there markusmerkus,
sweden is a great place to study especially if your main choice is Lulea; the most northern university in the world.
one thing i will let you in on though, is the fact that most studies in swedish universities is purely independent. i mean this with a whole new meaning of independent study .... and i mean directly from a text book and mostly in your own time. the cultural approach to the education system in sweden is very different to that of the uk.

my intention is not to knock you down or patronise you in anyway, but just merely to share some of my personal experience of studying in sweden. However, it will be a great opportunity and you should jump to the chance if available.

oh it may not be free for non-swedish residence now, but i can't be sure on that. it would be way cheaper than paying the going rate of £9000 in the UK though. the cost of student housing was much cheaper than that of the uk too (believe it or not), i was paying £260 per month for an ensuite room (massive) and a shared kitchen of 6 and a balcony with an awesome view. plus, students are not obliged to pay energy bills either.

if you express an interest and sincerely want to study in a swedish uni then you will make it without the shadow of a doubt. but be prepared to learn Svenska, its not too hard and you will be respected a lot more.

anything else you need to know just ask, i'l be happy to help you.

good luck and kind regards.
0
reply
evantej
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#3
Report 7 years ago
#3
(Original post by PaintingJupiter)
[...] sweden is a great place to study especially if your main choice is Lulea; the most northern university in the world.
[...]
Lulea is not the most northern university in the world. Without checking for others, there is The University Centre in Svalbard, which is 400 miles north of Norway. I have checked for a more obvious one: Murmansk is further north than Lulea, and has two universities as far as I am aware.

Sorry for being pedantic.
4
reply
nulli tertius
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 7 years ago
#4
(Original post by evantej)
Lulea is not the most northern university in the world. Without checking for others, there is The University Centre in Svalbard, which is 400 miles north of Norway. I have checked for a more obvious one: Murmansk is further north than Lulea, and has two universities as far as I am aware.

Sorry for being pedantic.
Now that Umea has a campus in Kiruna, it is not even the northernmost university in Sweden!

Further, the northbound bus from Lulea will take you to Kemi-Tornio University just over the border in Finland.

Russia and mainland Norway both have more northerly universities. I think the universities in Murmansk are the most northerly "full service" universities in the world.
0
reply
rsq
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#5
Report 7 years ago
#5
Ok never mind the most northern university debate. You don't want to go there, it's cold.

The Swedish universities are generally rather easy to get into as long as you don't pick the most popular course. It tends to be a huge gap in the entry requirements between the most popular and the rest. The MA entry process is of course a bit different from Undergrad but in general you apply through www.antagning.se and you'll have to send different documents such as references etc depending on the requirements of each university and course. So check which courses you'd like to apply for and then their requirements. I don't think a 2.2 will stop you for most courses. People at uni tend to get quite crap grades in Sweden as there is a mentality that grades does not matter.

And keep in mind that finding a place to live might end up being more difficult than being accepted to make sure you check the terms regarding accommodation

Hope this helps a bit
1
reply
markusmerkus
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#6
(Original post by PaintingJupiter)
Hi there markusmerkus,
sweden is a great place to study especially if your main choice is Lulea; the most northern university in the world.
one thing i will let you in on though, is the fact that most studies in swedish universities is purely independent. i mean this with a whole new meaning of independent study .... and i mean directly from a text book and mostly in your own time. the cultural approach to the education system in sweden is very different to that of the uk.

my intention is not to knock you down or patronise you in anyway, but just merely to share some of my personal experience of studying in sweden. However, it will be a great opportunity and you should jump to the chance if available.

oh it may not be free for non-swedish residence now, but i can't be sure on that. it would be way cheaper than paying the going rate of £9000 in the UK though. the cost of student housing was much cheaper than that of the uk too (believe it or not), i was paying £260 per month for an ensuite room (massive) and a shared kitchen of 6 and a balcony with an awesome view. plus, students are not obliged to pay energy bills either.

if you express an interest and sincerely want to study in a swedish uni then you will make it without the shadow of a doubt. but be prepared to learn Svenska, its not too hard and you will be respected a lot more.

anything else you need to know just ask, i'l be happy to help you.

good luck and kind regards.
Thanks for that... and for the other replies.

Genuinely very interesting stuff. I had read a little about the Swedish studying culture and if i'm honest, I genuinely think that would suit me. I tend to prefer independent study, especially during exam times, rather than "contact time" so i don't think that's an issue.

The only thing that really concerns me is putting all my eggs into going to Lund, Gothenburg or Stockholm (ideally) and then not being accepted... would leave me in limbo for a year or so. Answers so far have eased my concerns a little.

Would political science and such courses be considered "popular" in Sweden? I really wouldn't know...

Currently trying to spark up some sort of email relationship with relevant course convenors to see if that could come in handy come application time.

Fully intend to learn some Swedish even if, as i'm told, no right minded Swede would converse in it with me...
0
reply
markusmerkus
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#7
(Original post by rsq)
Ok never mind the most northern university debate. You don't want to go there, it's cold.

The Swedish universities are generally rather easy to get into as long as you don't pick the most popular course. It tends to be a huge gap in the entry requirements between the most popular and the rest. The MA entry process is of course a bit different from Undergrad but in general you apply through www.antagning.se and you'll have to send different documents such as references etc depending on the requirements of each university and course. So check which courses you'd like to apply for and then their requirements. I don't think a 2.2 will stop you for most courses. People at uni tend to get quite crap grades in Sweden as there is a mentality that grades does not matter.

And keep in mind that finding a place to live might end up being more difficult than being accepted to make sure you check the terms regarding accommodation

Hope this helps a bit
I'm pretty resigned to living a little bit out of town wherever I go, is this right?

Would I likely be living in a small house/apartment with other Swedish students and would you recommend sorting this before I leave or at an accommodation fair that I know some universities put on?
0
reply
PaintingJupiter
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#8
Report 7 years ago
#8
(Original post by nulli tertius)
Now that Umea has a campus in Kiruna, it is not even the northernmost university in Sweden!
lulea also has a campus in Kiruna. however though, they both won't be there for long and Kiruna city is ready to be destroyed and rebuilt.
0
reply
PaintingJupiter
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#9
Report 7 years ago
#9
(Original post by markusmerkus)

Would political science and such courses be considered "popular" in Sweden? I really wouldn't know...
hi again,
when i was over in sweden, i remember getting into a deep conversation regarding students going into higher education. one of the guys who i lived with mentioned that higher education in sweden is not as popular as in the uk; this is predominantly down to people going straight into work after they finish school... there is quite a bit of work out there.
the student number are in general quite small compared to the uk and you will probably find no more than 15 people to a single class. personally, i don't think your going to experience any problems whatsoever. just get the ball rolling and you'll probably find that you will be right in there.

another thing, don't let people put you off going. your going to hear many complaints about weather, this and that. i got it, but half of those people complaining had never actually been and i found they were totally wrong about everything. i say go for it and learn yourself; not from wikipedia troll monsters .

regards.
0
reply
nulli tertius
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#10
Report 7 years ago
#10
(Original post by PaintingJupiter)
Kiruna city is ready to be destroyed and rebuilt.
Why? Is it the mine?
0
reply
PaintingJupiter
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#11
Report 7 years ago
#11
(Original post by nulli tertius)
Why? Is it the mine?
yes, thats why. The LKAB mine owns something like 3-5% of the worlds share in iron ore. The project is worth over €13000000000.
At least thats what i heard in a lecture.
0
reply
markusmerkus
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#12
(Original post by PaintingJupiter)
hi again,
when i was over in sweden, i remember getting into a deep conversation regarding students going into higher education. one of the guys who i lived with mentioned that higher education in sweden is not as popular as in the uk; this is predominantly down to people going straight into work after they finish school... there is quite a bit of work out there.
the student number are in general quite small compared to the uk and you will probably find no more than 15 people to a single class. personally, i don't think your going to experience any problems whatsoever. just get the ball rolling and you'll probably find that you will be right in there.

another thing, don't let people put you off going. your going to hear many complaints about weather, this and that. i got it, but half of those people complaining had never actually been and i found they were totally wrong about everything. i say go for it and learn yourself; not from wikipedia troll monsters .

regards.
Very helpful. Great stuff, thank you...

Hell bent on going now. Have really been sold by it since i've started to look into it.
Kind of have my heart set on Lund with Gothenburg a very close second. Intend to apply for up to half a dozen places though to hopefully have a little bit of choice.
0
reply
gumball
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#13
Report 7 years ago
#13
You have to go to Sweden so you can visit this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icehote...kasj%C3%A4rvi)

Just found that when he was talking about Kiruna. [/offtopic]
0
reply
markusmerkus
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#14
Cool...
0
reply
Jyckee
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#15
Report 7 years ago
#15
(Original post by PaintingJupiter)
hi again,
when i was over in sweden, i remember getting into a deep conversation regarding students going into higher education. one of the guys who i lived with mentioned that higher education in sweden is not as popular as in the uk; this is predominantly down to people going straight into work after they finish school... there is quite a bit of work out there.
the student number are in general quite small compared to the uk and you will probably find no more than 15 people to a single class. personally, i don't think your going to experience any problems whatsoever. just get the ball rolling and you'll probably find that you will be right in there.

another thing, don't let people put you off going. your going to hear many complaints about weather, this and that. i got it, but half of those people complaining had never actually been and i found they were totally wrong about everything. i say go for it and learn yourself; not from wikipedia troll monsters .

regards.
At most schools the classes are larger than 15 people in a single class.
0
reply
Observatory
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#16
Report 7 years ago
#16
(Original post by rsq)
People at uni tend to get quite crap grades in Sweden as there is a mentality that grades does not matter.
Do you mean that in the sense that people are marked harshly because professors don't expect it will hurt their prospects, or in the sense that students perform poorly because they don't care how they do in their degree?
0
reply
rsq
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#17
Report 7 years ago
#17
(Original post by Observatory)
Do you mean that in the sense that people are marked harshly because professors don't expect it will hurt their prospects, or in the sense that students perform poorly because they don't care how they do in their degree?
Usually people don't study that hard. They are happy just to graduate and presume they'll get a job without good grades.

But I think that if you have a 2.2 you'll find a course that you'll get accepted to. Especially if you look at "less prestigious" universities (anything except SSE, Royal Institute of techn., Chalmers, Karolinska Institute, Uppsala, Lund).

And regarding accommodation, I know that some universities have extra accommodation for foreign students. (Like with the grades, you are more likley to get accommodation at less prestigious unis as long as they located outside Stockholm).
1
reply
Observatory
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#18
Report 7 years ago
#18
(Original post by rsq)
Usually people don't study that hard. They are happy just to graduate and presume they'll get a job without good grades.

But I think that if you have a 2.2 you'll find a course that you'll get accepted to. Especially if you look at "less prestigious" universities (anything except SSE, Royal Institute of techn., Chalmers, Karolinska Institute, Uppsala, Lund).
I'm not applying, I just find it interesting. The stereotype here is that Sweden has a very good education system, and that Swedes are conscientious and hard-working. Interesting (but not surprising) to hear that the result of grades-don't-matter culture is that most people don't bother doing any work.

That said, I like the sound of a place where you can get jobs without a degree. I think most here will never use their degree in employment, despite fact that that's the reason most to degrees.
0
reply
markusmerkus
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#19
Report Thread starter 7 years ago
#19
(Original post by rsq)
Usually people don't study that hard. They are happy just to graduate and presume they'll get a job without good grades.

But I think that if you have a 2.2 you'll find a course that you'll get accepted to. Especially if you look at "less prestigious" universities (anything except SSE, Royal Institute of techn., Chalmers, Karolinska Institute, Uppsala, Lund).

And regarding accommodation, I know that some universities have extra accommodation for foreign students. (Like with the grades, you are more likley to get accommodation at less prestigious unis as long as they located outside Stockholm).
Thanks. All very helpful.
Would you think i'd be pretty likely to be considered for somewhere like Lund with a 2:1? It has a 2:2/ECTS C entry requirement but I get the feeling they expect more.

Also seriously considering the University of Gothenburg. How is it perceived in Sweden?
0
reply
rsq
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#20
Report 7 years ago
#20
(Original post by Observatory)
I'm not applying, I just find it interesting. The stereotype here is that Sweden has a very good education system, and that Swedes are conscientious and hard-working. Interesting (but not surprising) to hear that the result of grades-don't-matter culture is that most people don't bother doing any work.

That said, I like the sound of a place where you can get jobs without a degree. I think most here will never use their degree in employment, despite fact that that's the reason most to degrees.
Well I think that's an old myth that is quite wrong sadly

And about the getting a job without a degree, I don't know who said that you can do that. I think that is very difficult today, without any connections. One could do that 20 years ago but I don't think they'll even look twice at a CV without any degree if one would apply for a moderately qualified job.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Sheffield Hallam University
    Get into Teaching in South Yorkshire Undergraduate
    Wed, 26 Feb '20
  • The University of Law
    Solicitor Series: Assessing Trainee Skills – LPC, GDL and MA Law - London Moorgate campus Postgraduate
    Wed, 26 Feb '20
  • University of East Anglia
    PGCE Open day Postgraduate
    Sat, 29 Feb '20

People at uni: do initiations (like heavy drinking) put you off joining sports societies?

Yes (420)
67.42%
No (203)
32.58%

Watched Threads

View All