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    (Original post by Sophdoph)
    Applied for Economics without maths at Oxford (as part of PPE) Bath, Southampton, Manchester and Surrey.

    Rejected from Oxford, Bath for straight Economics and Economics with Politics, which I thought was slightly harsh :rolleyes:

    I am predicted AAA, with AAAB at AS and 10 As+A*s at GCSE, and was told by Bath at the open day one of their main deciding factors is A Level Maths, and they don't credit candidates for taking A Level Economics. This to me seems bizzare
    The content in Economics A-Level will be covered within the first year at any decent university course. At my university it took about 1.5 weeks to cover the micro A-Level stuff at the start of the first term, and 1.5 to cover the macro stuff in the second term. A-Level economics is to basic to be of much benifit, once you get to university and start applying maths to basic principles; most of your A-Level knowledge goes out the window.
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    (Original post by Sophdoph)
    Applied for Economics without maths at Oxford (as part of PPE) Bath, Southampton, Manchester and Surrey.

    Rejected from Oxford, Bath for straight Economics and Economics with Politics, which I thought was slightly harsh :rolleyes:

    I am predicted AAA, with AAAB at AS and 10 As+A*s at GCSE, and was told by Bath at the open day one of their main deciding factors is A Level Maths, and they don't credit candidates for taking A Level Economics. This to me seems bizzare
    What did you put down as your firm choice?

    I was rejected from Oxford (E&M) and Bath for economics - I've decided on Manchester from my remaining choices.
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    I am thinking of applying to do economics at Cambridge, UCL, Bath, Bristol, LSE. I am currently studying, AS Maths, Biology, Geography, History and ICT, i am predicted all A's. At the end of this year i am goin to drop ICT and carry on with Maths, Biology, Geography and History to A-Level hopefully geting all A's.

    What are my chances of a successful application??
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    (Original post by Wise Man)
    I am thinking of applying to do economics at Cambridge, UCL, Bath, Bristol, LSE. I am currently studying, AS Maths, Biology, Geography, History and ICT, i am predicted all A's. At the end of this year i am goin to drop ICT and carry on with Maths, Biology, Geography and History to A-Level hopefully geting all A's.

    What are my chances of a successful application??
    what gcses did you get? if they are decent obviously youve got a good chance with a decent ps
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    (Original post by Wise Man)
    I am thinking of applying to do economics at Cambridge, UCL, Bath, Bristol, LSE. I am currently studying, AS Maths, Biology, Geography, History and ICT, i am predicted all A's. At the end of this year i am goin to drop ICT and carry on with Maths, Biology, Geography and History to A-Level hopefully geting all A's.

    What are my chances of a successful application??
    Probable as good a chance as any other candidate. We're not admission tutor, there's not much point in asking us.
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    (Original post by need_help)
    What did you put down as your firm choice?

    I was rejected from Oxford (E&M) and Bath for economics - I've decided on Manchester from my remaining choices.
    I've put Southampton as firm, Manchester as insurance
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    mate got four A levels and a half (aaaa), didnt get to top uni either, prejudice to foreigners. Never mind, doin well, but ya should have som background in maths its real important. I had two study first two modules in advanced maths ( didnt even had a choice).... so study maths and you will be ok. These days they dont really care about budist or ghandi economics its all about mathematical economics - thats a way forward... \good luck in whatever you decide to do....
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    The truth is, that it seems most Uni's think maths is the most important subject, when studying Economics. Which I personally feel is a bit stupid. At Uni's you can avoid a lot of maths module, by doing social sides instead.


    I took:

    Maths (B at AS) (predicted B at A2)
    History (A at AS) (predicted A)
    ICT (A at AS) (predicted A)
    Economics (A at AS) (predicted A)
    GS (Dunno yet...) (predicted A)

    For GCSE I got:

    7 A*'s and 5 A's (inc. A* in maths and A in Statistics)



    Cambridge seemed really hung up on the fact:

    a) I didn't do FURTHER MATHS!!!
    and
    b) I only was predicted B for maths when my other three were A's

    I think thats why they rejected me!!


    My other unis all accepted me on conditional offers, most of which had the clause (for example) ABB - with B in maths. Or AAA (inc. maths). And so on.

    Fortunately, as I have completely messed up A2 maths last week, I picked Durham Uni which offered me ABB (inc. Economics), which I personally feel is far better!!!
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    (Original post by AdamC)
    The truth is, that it seems most Uni's think maths is the most important subject, when studying Economics. Which I personally feel is a bit stupid. At Uni's you can avoid a lot of maths module, by doing social sides instead.
    Why? Maths is very important to Economics, it is by far the moat important (and useful) A-Level to have. And even if you chose the less mathematical courses, you will still do your fair share of Maths; Maths isn't just in Econometrics units, which some people round here seem to think.
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    (Original post by Sony)
    mate got four A levels and a half (aaaa), didnt get to top uni either, prejudice to foreigners.
    I doubt it's prejudice against foreigners, infact univs prefer taking them due to the extra fees they pay.
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    (Original post by wonkey)
    ..i don't think physics or bio would be much use to be honest if u plan to do econ. i suppose u could say the same for chem, but chem is probs the best out of the 3. i do maths, chem, econ. i really enjoy all 3, except maths sometimes.
    This is unhelpful advice. Physics, Chem and Bio are all considered on equal terms, ie no particular one is thought of as being "the best out of the 3". You seems to have come to the conclusion that chem is "the best" just because you take the subject. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by BazTheMoney)
    Why? Maths is very important to Economics, it is by far the moat important (and useful) A-Level to have. And even if you chose the less mathematical courses, you will still do your fair share of Maths; Maths isn't just in Econometrics units, which some people round here seem to think.

    For the MPhil Course that ur going to be doing, A-level Further Maths 'd be enough or u need to learn extra Maths?
    BTW i though Econometrics is mainly statistics , if it is then why do Unis Encourage u to do "as many pure mathematics modeules as possible"?
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    (Original post by HamaL)
    For the MPhil Course that ur going to be doing, A-level Further Maths 'd be enough or u need to learn extra Maths?
    BTW i though Econometrics is mainly statistics , if it is then why do Unis Encourage u to do "as many pure mathematics modeules as possible"?

    Exactly.
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    Looking at the Cambridge course now, i do agree that A2 maths is probably necessary to help you the most. Otherwise it's probably a bit of a struggle.

    But when I looked at the Cambridge course, the compulsory stats/pure module only appeared in your 1st year (However, can this be so much harder than the standard A2 maths that most colleges will turn top grade candidates down just because they dont have further maths?)

    After that, you could choose to do the Econometrics or the Social or the Development. Admittedly you do have to do the macro and micro compulsory papers....

    because they dont (as far as i know) make any further specific maths modules compulsory, any options in the second part of the tripos cant expect any further mathematical knowledge than that 1st maths module. and therefore all extra maths should be taught for the micro and macro by the lecturers and tutors.

    maths is extremely important for Economics, without a doubt, but you should be able to cope with economics + devt/social at cambridge. in which case if you choose devt you should be doing geog and/or history which improves essay skills (and thats also extremely important for other parts of economics and school level maths cannot teach you that!)
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    (Original post by Jessie)
    But when I looked at the Cambridge course, the compulsory stats/pure module only appeared in your 1st year (However, can this be so much harder than the standard A2 maths that most colleges will turn top grade candidates down just because they dont have further maths?)
    People who only have maths a level can get 1sts in the maths section (which includes stats) its just that the people who get marks in the 90 almost all have done maths furthermaths - its an easy discrimator for admissions tutors.

    (Original post by Jessie)
    After that, you could choose to do the Econometrics or the Social or the Development. Admittedly you do have to do the macro and micro compulsory papers....

    Not completely true. Econometrics is compulsory in th esecond year as well to everyone. You make a choice between maths and development NOT econometics and development. The maths paper in the second year is completely pure. If you are good at maths (i.e further mathematicians) it is easier to get higher marks in the maths papers than development (because its essay based) so its quite logical for DOS and admissions tutors to be keen on f.maths. Its not necessary for first year but it helps tremendous in the second and third year. Also some micro and macro questions will be maths questions (this happens every year) and it is very usefull to have done the mathematical sections of the course (I.e maths second year option).

    Furthermore, being good at maths does not limit your options in your final year! if you dont do the maths paper in year 2 your options are limited in the third although there is still a lot of choice but this is not the case if you do development
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    (Original post by HamaL)
    For the MPhil Course that ur going to be doing, A-level Further Maths 'd be enough or u need to learn extra Maths?
    BTW i though Econometrics is mainly statistics , if it is then why do Unis Encourage u to do "as many pure mathematics modeules as possible"?
    Mphil will be well beyond A-Level maths, probable similar to second year undergraduate (without the mechanics).
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    (Original post by BazTheMoney)
    Mphil will be well beyond A-Level maths, probable similar to second year undergraduate (without the mechanics).
    WOW, 2nd yr of a Maths Degree?
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    (Original post by HamaL)
    WOW, 2nd yr of a Maths Degree?
    I would imagine so, you go beyond Further Maths doing an Economics Degree.
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    Am currently doing an Economics degree at University of Liverpool. Not the most mathematically orientated course (compared to the likes of Warwick and LSE) but certainly some maths. We have a maths module which is split into 2 classes (one of those who have AS or A-leel maths, and another for those who have GCSE only). However, despite the extra lessons the GCSE lot get, the gap in the average mark between the two groups is still very large, think the difference could eb about 20%!

    Econometrics is statistics based but it helps to have plenty of pure maths knowledge for it. It is more tricky statistics than you tend to come across in the stats modules in A-level maths. I did econometrics this year, got a first in the module so I am going to do more of it in third year. Also, Econometrics involves a lot of mathematical and statistical notation, so knowledge and experience of pure maths and statistics will certainly make an econometrics course easier to handle.

    Also, whether Economics is useful, I'd say only near the beginning, and even then it is not much help because the core economics can go beyong A-level in a matter of weeks. In the first microeconomics module, I got told by some people who had done economics at A-level (I didn;t do it at A-level) that we had gone past the A-level stuff in 5 weeks! Maths is a far more useful A-level to have, mainly because reading some of the text books can be a bit tricky without a decent maths knowledge, as there is a lot of mathematical notation there.
 
 
 
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