chelseafan
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Hi, I am going to be starting my A levels soon and I have picked Economics as one of my options. I haven't done it at GCSE but i am very interested in economics and regularly read the economist.

I'm looking for any general tips people can share for A level Economics. Any advice is greatly appreciated.

Thanks.
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JOR2010
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Do some wider reading, keep up with the Economist, and read the articles. If there's a topic you enjoy in class, research it some more at home! Make sure you are confident in your understanding of Economics.
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chelseafan
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(Original post by JOR2010)
Do some wider reading, keep up with the Economist, and read the articles. If there's a topic you enjoy in class, research it some more at home! Make sure you are confident in your understanding of Economics.
Thanks for the advice.
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jade456
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I've just finished my first year of A level economics. I've found the year very difficult, but unlike you, i have no outside interest in economics. If there is one piece of advice that i could give it would be to keep on top of each new topic you learn. This may only be applicable to my situation as we were provided with bulks of information in class, which makes it seem as if there's so much to learn. I'm one of those people that leaves learning material to just before exams, but with economics, i find that it's a subject that you should keep on top of all the way throughout the year. Try to familiarize yourself with each new topic as it's being taught.
I also found that students in my economics class were far more competitive with each other than in other subjects (again, could just be specific to my situation...)

Good luck with starting A-levels.
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BC95
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Are you doing Macro-economics or Micro-economics
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CoolStoryBroo
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(Original post by BC95)
Are you doing Macro-economics or Micro-economics
I'm assuming s/he'll be doing both in AS
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chelseafan
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(Original post by BC95)
Are you doing Macro-economics or Micro-economics
i'm not sure really....
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Damsel007
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i just finish my AS economics and i got an A (191/200) so here are my advice based on AQA exam board.

Before the exam do all the past multichoice question because they recycle question
Tutor2u is your best friend.
And for the first few month you are going to get confused like wtf am doing but it all makes around march time
Ask your teacher for help and make sure you practice the data question. Do all the 25 marker essay and give it to your teacher to mark. Good luck. I honestly enjoy the subject and am glad i picked it over psychology.
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jay234
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There are some really good tutorials on youtube, which might help - just have a search through.
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BC95
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(Original post by CoolStoryBroo)
I'm assuming s/he'll be doing both in AS
I know some college's offer a choice of which one they study
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Little Ant
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I also just finished my AS level and got 193/200 (AQA)

I disliked economics, it really was not my type of thing. If you're going into it expecting maths, you're going to be disappointed. There is very little maths and it is mainly politics and essay writing. Get the 'basic structure' of your answers down and then do a lot of practice. Multi-choice is easy, you can easily get 25/25 on them, just practice.

Keep up to date on all the current affairs - eg. in feburary 2012 the trade gap widened; in september 2011 the inflation rate was 5.2% - and also make sure you understand all past events - eg. the recession, the lawson boom etc.

Use tutor2u, it is excellent. If you're doing AQA then I found the Economics Nelson Thornes textbook to be very useful (if somewhat outdated as it was written before the recession. I liked that as it gave me a new perspective) if used in conjunction with Tutor2u and also this revision guide.

If you're willing to work, you will be rewarded.

Good luck!
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CoolStoryBroo
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(Original post by Little Ant)
I also just finished my AS level and got 193/200 (AQA)
I only got 125/200 therefore I need to get 80mks each on both papers next year in A2 to get my average up to my B targer. Can you please give me some tips on what you do to get high marks?
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mr j man
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The Alain anderton seems a good book but I have just started self-teaching.
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Little Ant
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(Original post by CoolStoryBroo)
I only got 125/200 therefore I need to get 80mks each on both papers next year in A2 to get my average up to my B targer. Can you please give me some tips on what you do to get high marks?
On top of learning the general figures from the news as I previously stated (such as the current inflation rate or the growth figures from the last few years) -

My four main tips to doing well:

1. Learn the course content extremely well so that whatever comes up from the syllabus, whether inflation or division of labour or whatever, you can conjure a coherent argument about it. A good way to do this is to print off a syllabus and create a 'checklist' during revision (ie, check off what you know, leaving only what you do not so you can learn it)

2. Learn to structure the essay questions, especially the 25 marker if you're doing AQA as that alone is work 1/3 of the marks. I'm sure tutor2u has tutorials on this or just ask your teacher to help you (or use mark schemes).

3. Learn the definitions of everything possible. Even simply 'demand' which as simple as it sounds can be hard to define. One way to do this is whilst revising, (as in going through a revision guide), write down every word or phrase that could come up - eg. division of labour, specialisation etc. - and then look for, or make up, a correct definition and then use flash cards to learn them!

4. Do as many multiple choices as humanly possible. The questions seem to be repeated every now and again - sometimes just with different figures - if you can get the timing down (so you complete all 25 in 13 minutes), the extra time you gain can give you enough time to excel in the written questions.

You can get your grade up to an A. Economics may seem really hard but it essentially boils down to honing your essay skills, fact learning and belief in yourself.

(Original post by mr j man)
The Alain anderton seems a good book but I have just started self-teaching.
I never really used that book. There were a fair few mistakes in the text, it was too heavy to carry to school and it was quite boring to read. Each to their own though!
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mr j man
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(Original post by Little Ant)
On top of learning the general figures from the news as I previously stated (such as the current inflation rate or the growth figures from the last few years) -

My four main tips to doing well:

1. Learn the course content extremely well so that whatever comes up from the syllabus, whether inflation or division of labour or whatever, you can conjure a coherent argument about it. A good way to do this is to print off a syllabus and create a 'checklist' during revision (ie, check off what you know, leaving only what you do not so you can learn it)

2. Learn to structure the essay questions, especially the 25 marker if you're doing AQA as that alone is work 1/3 of the marks. I'm sure tutor2u has tutorials on this or just ask your teacher to help you (or use mark schemes).

3. Learn the definitions of everything possible. Even simply 'demand' which as simple as it sounds can be hard to define. One way to do this is whilst revising, (as in going through a revision guide), write down every word or phrase that could come up - eg. division of labour, specialisation etc. - and then look for, or make up, a correct definition and then use flash cards to learn them!

4. Do as many multiple choices as humanly possible. The questions seem to be repeated every now and again - sometimes just with different figures - if you can get the timing down (so you complete all 25 in 13 minutes), the extra time you gain can give you enough time to excel in the written questions.

You can get your grade up to an A. Economics may seem really hard but it essentially boils down to honing your essay skills, fact learning and belief in yourself.



I never really used that book. There were a fair few mistakes in the text, it was too heavy to carry to school and it was quite boring to read. Each to their own though!
What were the mistakes as I am self-teaching and might not notice? What resources did you use?
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Samb142
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(Original post by jade456)
I've just finished my first year of A level economics. I've found the year very difficult, but unlike you, i have no outside interest in economics. If there is one piece of advice that i could give it would be to keep on top of each new topic you learn. This may only be applicable to my situation as we were provided with bulks of information in class, which makes it seem as if there's so much to learn. I'm one of those people that leaves learning material to just before exams, but with economics, i find that it's a subject that you should keep on top of all the way throughout the year. Try to familiarize yourself with each new topic as it's being taught.
I also found that students in my economics class were far more competitive with each other than in other subjects (again, could just be specific to my situation...)

Good luck with starting A-levels.
if ur still active? How did you learn and catch up the topics at the end of y12 as there was so much information?
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chelseafan
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Oh wow, time has flown by.

I ended up getting a B in my A level.
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