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DisturbingKand0R
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After a uk medical degree i would like to move to the US, but what exactly would i have to do?
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Harbour Seal
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You have to go through Hell the USMLE. Digitalis is the one to ask about this.

(Original post by digitalis)
:sexface:
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CocaineSquirrel
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It must get awfully boring for the same person to answer this question time and time again. If you Google USMLE, which is an exam made up of three-or-so stages, you should get all the answers that you need.
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Anna1988
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You need to do a "residency" in the US in order to be able to practice there (actually you need to pass the exams that come after this residency to be able to practice) getting the residency requires being ECFMG certified, the USMLE exam as well as some US experience like an elective and going on interviews. They go straight into specialties, no foundation training. Another problem when going from the UK is we're out of synch with them so their residencies start July of each year whereas most UK posts start and finish in August. I'm not 100% sure about this timing thing though so anyone who knows details please correct me
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thegodofgod
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Check out digitalis' extensive post history on the USMLE and all other necessary evils
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ViceVersa
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OP -> USMLE

(Original post by CocaineSquirrel)
It must get awfully boring for the same person to answer this question time and time again. If you Google USMLE, which is an exam made up of three-or-so stages, you should get all the answers that you need.
All he probably has to do is find his old post and cope and paste, or link it here the same way Democracy has done in the past. :yes:
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digitalis
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Do the USMLEs.
Do at the bare minimum your full elective in the US, if not a couple of SSCs/research positions during holidays.
Graduate and apply for ECFMG Certification.
Write a personal statement and gather letters of recommendation from preferably US physicians
Apply for residency through the NRMP Match.

You are now a practising US physician and are equivalent to a US MD (hell, some states will even confer a 'free' MD on you if you are an IMG with a state licence, like NY http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/med/med-mdconferral.htm)
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ViceVersa
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(Original post by digitalis)
Do the USMLEs.
Do at the bare minimum your full elective in the US, if not a couple of SSCs/research positions during holidays.
Graduate and apply for ECFMG Certification.
Write a personal statement and gather letters of recommendation from preferably US physicians
Apply for residency through the NRMP Match.

You are now a practising US physician and are equivalent to a US MD (hell, some states will even confer a 'free' MD on you if you are an IMG with a state licence, like NY http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/med/med-mdconferral.htm)
Is this what you've been doing/planning to do?
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digitalis
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(Original post by ViceVersa)
Is this what you've been doing/planning to do?
Yeah, I've done the required exams and am currently waiting for ECFMG certification.
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ViceVersa
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(Original post by digitalis)
Yeah, I've done the required exams and am currently waiting for ECFMG certification.
And it's worth doing it all to you?
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digitalis
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(Original post by ViceVersa)
And it's worth doing it all to you?
I think so. Made medical school exams look like a joke here, definitely improved my medical knowledge.

Opens up a lot of doors in the future, even if I was to stay here (easily get a fellowship in the US being ECFMG certified)

In terms of training, the US is miles ahead of the UK. It is proper, rigorous academic training, not the poor excuse that is postgraduate medical education here. I'm talking daily lectures, time off for research, proper clinical responsibility and supervision, daily consultant teaching rounds where you actually get taught, excellent funding and ancillary services (never have to do a cannula again), free food, subsidised housing. Plus, residency is far shorter than here. I want to do medicine, which is THREE YEARS out of medical school. Then you are an attending, your own boss.
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ViceVersa
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(Original post by digitalis)
I think so. Made medical school exams look like a joke here, definitely improved my medical knowledge.

Opens up a lot of doors in the future, even if I was to stay here (easily get a fellowship in the US being ECFMG certified)

In terms of training, the US is miles ahead of the UK. It is proper, rigorous academic training, not the poor excuse that is postgraduate medical education here. I'm talking daily lectures, time off for research, proper clinical responsibility and supervision, daily consultant teaching rounds where you actually get taught, excellent funding and ancillary services (never have to do a cannula again), free food, subsidised housing. Plus, residency is far shorter than here. I want to do medicine, which is THREE YEARS out of medical school. Then you are an attending, your own boss.
All sounds good. I dunno I've considered it on and off for a few years now.
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Anna1988
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(Original post by digitalis)
I think so. Made medical school exams look like a joke here, definitely improved my medical knowledge.

Opens up a lot of doors in the future, even if I was to stay here (easily get a fellowship in the US being ECFMG certified)

In terms of training, the US is miles ahead of the UK. It is proper, rigorous academic training, not the poor excuse that is postgraduate medical education here. I'm talking daily lectures, time off for research, proper clinical responsibility and supervision, daily consultant teaching rounds where you actually get taught, excellent funding and ancillary services (never have to do a cannula again), free food, subsidised housing. Plus, residency is far shorter than here. I want to do medicine, which is THREE YEARS out of medical school. Then you are an attending, your own boss.
Can I ask what stage of your training you are at now? Have you had to take a year out or have you been doing all this during your foundation years?
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digitalis
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(Original post by Anna1988)
Can I ask what stage of your training you are at now? Have you had to take a year out or have you been doing all this during your foundation years?
I'm an F1. Did Step 1, 2CK and 2CS all between 4th year summer holidays and Finals in March.
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Anna1988
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(Original post by digitalis)
I'm an F1. Did Step 1, 2CK and 2CS all between 4th year summer holidays and Finals in March.
So would you have to do your interviews during your F1 holidays? Also since residency starts in July and Foundation sign-off is normally August, how will this work when trying to apply to the states from uk?
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digitalis
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(Original post by Anna1988)
So would you have to do your interviews during your F1 holidays? Also since residency starts in July and Foundation sign-off is normally August, how will this work when trying to apply to the states from uk?
Yep. And I would either resign F1 or F2 if i were to apply next year.
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JamesYoung
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Yeah, they may have better facilities, better pay, better perks, better standards of teaching etc. But there's a reason for that. Just spare a thought for the 100million who can't afford healthcare. Talk of "saving lives"...
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digitalis
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(Original post by JamesYoung)
Yeah, they may have better facilities, better pay, better perks, better standards of teaching etc. But there's a reason for that. Just spare a thought for the 100million who can't afford healthcare. Talk of "saving lives"...
:rofl:
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Anna1988
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(Original post by JamesYoung)
Yeah, they may have better facilities, better pay, better perks, better standards of teaching etc. But there's a reason for that. Just spare a thought for the 100million who can't afford healthcare. Talk of "saving lives"...
If only we could all run around "saving lives" Grey's Anatomy style! Healthcare is viewed differently there compared to the UK, shouldn't really compare it to the NHS, completely different world
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SarahGummer
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(Original post by digitalis)
:rofl:

Hi

I'm looking at sitting the USMLE and wanted to ask you some questions as I see you know a lot about it. Would you mind?
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