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IB Score for IVY League School?

I am just wondering if anyone has any precise information about that the IB diploma score should be if one wants to have a chance at the IVY League universities in the US or perhaps some of the other top US universities that offer a need-blind financial support???

I have noticed that these schools do not take into account the overall score of the Ib Diploma, but look at the score without the extra (max 3) points from the EE, TOK and CAS. So, anyone that has information about typical IB scores that these ivy and top universities make offers on?

Take a chill pill

/D.

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Reply 1
Hm, I have no idea but I'd be really interested to know.... :p:
Reply 2
they do expect applicants to have good predicted scores. but they don't make conditional offers - almost all offers are unconditional. I guess you'd need at least 38-39 points (excl. the bonus points). The Ivies are just as difficult to get in, if not more, than Oxbridge.
Reply 3
vivwc107
they do expect applicants to have good predicted scores. but they don't make conditional offers - almost all offers are unconditional. I guess you'd need at least 38-39 points (excl. the bonus points). The Ivies are just as difficult to get in, if not more, than Oxbridge.

I think because of that it's probs not harder to get into the Ivies than Oxbridge. For Oxbridge you actually need to put in a lot of effort to get the grades - you can get fantastic predictions (usually they are higher than you are atm) but you might not get the same results in the end. Oxbridge usually gives offers of at least 40, unless they are sure of someone to be a genius.
Reply 4
A friend of mine got into University of Pennsylvania Wharton Business school with an Early Application and the scores he applied with were about 39. That was good enough and I think he made a good impression on his interview.
Reply 5
Its frustrating that I can not find any information about this on the universities websites!! But I guess that above 40 (inkl. the extra points should be a typical qualification to have a chance at getting an offer - similar to Oxbridge).

I got 34 on my IB diploma (with 3 extra points) = I got 31 points overall without the extra points.
I was predicted 43 at the start of the last IB year, but my girl and my best friend died in a caraccident about a 3 weeks before x-mas and I kinda got lost and didn't study at all = so got only 34!!! I've been thinking about doing retakes. What do you guys think? Do Ivy Leagues and Oxbridge, St. Adrews, Edinburgh and so forth accepts students that have done retakes or do the requirements get even higher and stiffer for such students.

What are your thoughts on University of Birmingham. I am thinkig about doing International Relations and Birmigham is 7th in the UK for Politics and IR.

Ciao
/D
my school has a tradition in getting kids to IVY league..
3 have passed to brown and 1 to princeton so..

u have to have good grades in the IB sth around 38-40 but this is not the only thing...since offers are unconditional u MUST have good SAT scores..

a friend of mine got rejected from all IVY league unis having 42 prediction but 650 in most of the SATs.

this is really b***** since the IB is much more difficult than the SAT..and those unis dont seem to appreciate it..

so i suggest that even with those IB scores (maybe improve ur HL subjects in retake??) and with quite high SAT grades (i would say more than 750 out of 800) u do stand chances...!!!
Reply 7
A friend of mine got into Harvard with a 41 prediction and great SAT scores. Her extra-curricular activities are amazing tho.. u cant really judge by your IB scores.. The USA cares more about GPA(grade point average) and SAT scores.
Reply 8
Yeah! Dont ivys however look at retakes in a different way? My extracurriculars are good and consistent, and I got 2100 on SAT.
Reply 9
of course you should do retakes! most unis are ok with it, as long as you provide a reason for that - i.e. the unfortunate thing that happened to you. so try again! but speak to ur ib coordinator/ higher education councellor, as they should be able to help you! good luck!
Reply 10
yeah, but I gotta tell u, our ib coordinator is a d**k head. She has no idea what she is doing, so it is potentially quite dangerous to ask her for advise or help! But yeah I guess ill do the retakes.
Reply 11
In the US (at least in my area) we don't get predicted scores for IB - they just don't do mock exams that are scored, & i'd never even heard of predicted scores until i joined TSR. So when we apply to colleges, they have no way of knowing what we'll get on exams. Even if you've taken SL exams in 11th grade, I don't think that would be a big part of the decision.

I definitely agree with what's been said about how US schools care more about SAT & GPA. But even if you get a perfect SAT & 4.0 GPA, there's still no guarantee of getting in at Ivy Leagues & other really top colleges, because they really do put a lot of weight on things like extracurriculars, application essays, recommendations, etc.
Lipton
A friend of mine got into Harvard with a 41 prediction and great SAT scores. Her extra-curricular activities are amazing tho.. u cant really judge by your IB scores.. The USA cares more about GPA(grade point average) and SAT scores.


Do we have the same friend? :biggrin: My friend got into Harvard with 41 prediction and SAT too. Though I dont think she thinks her SAT score was that great.

SChools in the US usually take your predicted, SAT, application essays, and GPA all in one.
Reply 13
sUmMeR Rulz


a friend of mine got rejected from all IVY league unis having 42 prediction but 650 in most of the SATs.

this is really b***** since the IB is much more difficult than the SAT..and those unis dont seem to appreciate it..


I am predicted 44 points, have great EC's, but my SATs were pretty lousy (2180)...and I got rejected from Stanford and most likely from Princeton too. But I think I chose hard courses and work a lot for them, so it does seem as if they don't appreciate the IB very much - but maybe that's just me trying to shift the blame:rolleyes: Yet IB IS much harder than SATs, and as internationals we don't have (well, I didn't) the opportunity to retake the SATs again and again....it's no fair!

Sorry for the rant :biggrin:
sereture
I am predicted 44 points, have great EC's, but my SATs were pretty lousy (2180)...and I got rejected from Stanford and most likely from Princeton too. But I think I chose hard courses and work a lot for them, so it does seem as if they don't appreciate the IB very much - but maybe that's just me trying to shift the blame:rolleyes: Yet IB IS much harder than SATs, and as internationals we don't have (well, I didn't) the opportunity to retake the SATs again and again....it's no fair!

Sorry for the rant :biggrin:


No prob. I agree. My friends and I call the SAT - the Stupid American Test. They test very weird things. And it costs a hell of a lot of money to take SAT, especially when you convert from US$ into whatever currency you use. Frankly, if you have to learn the vocab word to do the test, how it is then your "scholastic aptitude"? Isn't aptitude suppose to be what you're capable of now without spend hours learning new stuff???
Reply 15
HMSChocolate
No prob. I agree. My friends and I call the SAT - the Stupid American Test. They test very weird things. And it costs a hell of a lot of money to take SAT, especially when you convert from US$ into whatever currency you use. Frankly, if you have to learn the vocab word to do the test, how it is then your "scholastic aptitude"? Isn't aptitude suppose to be what you're capable of now without spend hours learning new stuff???


Hehe I suppose it could be called that. I've taken the PSAT before, and it is rather a waste of money and time, especially since it doesn't test a lot of things that really count, like how one would act given a particular real-life situation. Am I stretching this a bit far? It does rather defeat the purpose of the SAT when people have to study for it to gain entrance, but that's sadly inevitable because of the fierce competition. I haven't applied to any universities outside my local area, let alone any American ones, because I feel that the ones that are close to home are sufficient for me academically since they're very good already, and are also a lot less expensive than some of the more prestigious universities, so I didn't take the SATs. But of course that's just me given my circumstances :smile:
After i saw all the replies i just got an idea that IB maybe is not as important as SAT even the other factors if you want to apply American uni.:frown:
everything may happen. Today i knew that one of my friends who got pridict 45 had been rejected by Harvard and Princeton though his SAT is extremely high with a full score in writing section.
Reply 17
There is no IB Score needed to get into Ivy League schools. Most of the time, you don't even have your scores before admissions decisions are made. The only thing that matters are your predicted grades. What Ivies want is that you took the most challenging program available to you. Other than that, the IB will definitely not help you a lot to get into Ivy League schools.
Reply 18
From what I've heard from my friends who've gotten into Harvard and other Ivy League schools, you would need predicted IB scores in at least the high 30s ie 38 to be considered. Most people who get in achieve at least 40. Aside from course rigour, grades, and good SAT scores, which you also need, these prestigious American universities also put a large emphasis on your extracurricular activities, service, evidence of leadership, etc and on your essays and recommendations. Therefore, while a candidate with a predicted total of 38 that is actively involved in extracurricular activities, has good reference letters, can demonstrate leadership etc may be admitted, an applicant with perfect predicted total of 45 and strong SAT scores who is lacking in these other areas will probably not be admitted. Unfortunately, since the competition is very strong for these universities, even a strong, well-rounded applicant may be beat out by a slightly stronger applicant.
Reply 19
Again, you don't need any predicted score to be considered.

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