Avshua
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#1
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#1
I know people say with a Physics degree, it opens a lot of doors not only in science but out of it. Thing is i don't want a job related to science in any way simply because i don't really find it interesting.

I very much prefer to do more white collar jobs like accounting, banking etc. However, when i go on various large companies websites, they all say they require a degree in Accountancy, Business, Economics or related. Even some only say Maths, various types of Engineering, but NO Physics.

This has got me really worried, does a Physics degree really open dorrs to that many jobs?
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DonWorryJockIsHere
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#2
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#2
I don't understand why they would say various types of engineering but no physics? Engineering is part of physics
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geditor
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#3
Report 9 years ago
#3
(Original post by Avshua)
I know people say with a Physics degree, it opens a lot of doors not only in science but out of it. Thing is i don't want a job related to science in any way simply because i don't really find it interesting.

I very much prefer to do more white collar jobs like accounting, banking etc. However, when i go on various large companies websites, they all say they require a degree in Accountancy, Business, Economics or related. Even some only say Maths, various types of Engineering, but NO Physics.

This has got me really worried, does a Physics degree really open dorrs to that many jobs?
I have this same problem so I've started thinking about Electrical/Electronic engineering.
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geditor
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#4
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#4
Can anyone offer any advice on this matter?
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tinyflame
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#5
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#5
I dont get it, why dont you just study something like economics instead of physics, if you dont like physics, it will save you a lot of trouble.
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matthew769
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#6
Report 9 years ago
#6
(Original post by Avshua)
I know people say with a Physics degree, it opens a lot of doors not only in science but out of it. Thing is i don't want a job related to science in any way simply because i don't really find it interesting.

I very much prefer to do more white collar jobs like accounting, banking etc. However, when i go on various large companies websites, they all say they require a degree in Accountancy, Business, Economics or related. Even some only say Maths, various types of Engineering, but NO Physics.

This has got me really worried, does a Physics degree really open dorrs to that many jobs?
Not sure why you'd do a degree in Physics if you don't find it interesting..
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tory88
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#7
Report 9 years ago
#7
With going into finance with big companies, I think that whilst physics degrees are not mentioned they will be looked upon favorably. After all it shows a high level of numeracy (anything done in maths and not in physics is not relevant in finance) and has more data analysis in it than a lot of other degrees. Aside from that, I currently study a physics degree (although I would rather be doing maths, that's and issue with interest, not employability) and many large companies recruit direct from the physics department at my university.
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Politricks
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#8
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#8
(Original post by Avshua)
when i go on various large companies websites, they all say they require a degree in Accountancy, Business, Economics or related. Even some only say Maths, various types of Engineering, but NO Physics.

This has got me really worried, does a Physics degree really open dorrs to that many jobs?
If you're really worried, then you could e-mail those companies and ask about Physics? I'm sure they find a Physics degree very desirable too.
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User990473
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#9
Report 9 years ago
#9
You said you are not interested in science but you are interested in doing the degree anyway. So from that I assume you are planning on studying it for career prospects and universal acceptance of the degree. Why not do maths? It is one of the degrees you mentioned is allowed and is just as (maybe arguably more) adaptable in terms of acceptance in difference career fields.

Otherwise just do as the guy above me suggested.
If you're really worried, then you could e-mail those companies and ask about Physics? I'm sure they find a Physics degree very desirable too.
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Observatory
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#10
Report 9 years ago
#10
(Original post by Avshua)
I know people say with a Physics degree, it opens a lot of doors not only in science but out of it. Thing is i don't want a job related to science in any way simply because i don't really find it interesting.

I very much prefer to do more white collar jobs like accounting, banking etc. However, when i go on various large companies websites, they all say they require a degree in Accountancy, Business, Economics or related. Even some only say Maths, various types of Engineering, but NO Physics.

This has got me really worried, does a Physics degree really open dorrs to that many jobs?
What companies?

Banks and accountancy firms don't care what degree you have, and the former certainly don't favour accountancy or business degrees over physics. Accountancy degrees in particular are basically a scam since you spend 3 years to receive fairly minor exemptions from the exams accountancy firms have to put you through anyway.
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TheFOMaster
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#11
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#11
(Original post by matthew769)
Not sure why you'd do a degree in Physics if you don't find it interesting..
I think he means he wouldn't find a job related to physics interesting, but finds learning physics interesting. I'm quite the same.
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geditor
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#12
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#12
(Original post by TheFOMaster)
I think he means he wouldn't find a job related to physics interesting, but finds learning physics interesting. I'm quite the same.
Well, that's what I mean I love learning physics but I don't really see any light at the end of tunnel. It's a hard degree to study for but I'll enjoy it - the problem is that I don't feel like I'll be able to get a well paid job for all the hard work in getting the degree. For example, I love teaching, but the amount of marking and preparation of work you have to do really just isn't worth to amount you get paid while the headmasters get paid much larger amounts for not really doing much. IMO anyway :P Any advice?
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TheFOMaster
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#13
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#13
(Original post by geditor)
Well, that's what I mean I love learning physics but I don't really see any light at the end of tunnel. It's a hard degree to study for but I'll enjoy it - the problem is that I don't feel like I'll be able to get a well paid job for all the hard work in getting the degree. For example, I love teaching, but the amount of marking and preparation of work you have to do really just isn't worth to amount you get paid while the headmasters get paid much larger amounts for not really doing much. IMO anyway :P Any advice?
Well I want to go and do a degree in Chemistry, but I don't want to go into a job in the Chemical industry. If you don't want a job in Science most Physical science grads would choose finance or accountancy. Another option would be to become a patent lawyer, Since you need knowledge of the subject. However I don't know how you'd get into that (whether it be the fast route LLB then post-grad, or just post-grad.) Or you could be a teacher as you said, which is what I want to do. As you said Headmasters seem to not have as much work as normal teachers, this is false IMO, since the need to keep the school in good image which can be really stressful. Also remember head teachers are just normal teachers who've gained experience and wanted to become a head master. My head teacher is a Geography Teacher.
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pappymajek
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#14
Report 9 years ago
#14
(Original post by Avshua)
I know people say with a Physics degree, it opens a lot of doors not only in science but out of it. Thing is i don't want a job related to science in any way simply because i don't really find it interesting.

I very much prefer to do more white collar jobs like accounting, banking etc. However, when i go on various large companies websites, they all say they require a degree in Accountancy, Business, Economics or related. Even some only say Maths, various types of Engineering, but NO Physics.

This has got me really worried, does a Physics degree really open dorrs to that many jobs?
I definitely wouldn't recommend studying physics at degree level if you don't enjoy it, any numerate degree will get you into finance/IB. That said, physics is very versatile and its not uncommon for physics graduates to gain employment in several industries including actuarial science, engineering, oil industry, aviation, finance or even IT. It all depends on your interests, skills and motivation.


This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
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Audioworm
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#15
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#15
Physics opens doors to pretty much any area, if you are willing to do a bit of outside training.

The reason physics grads are able to go into so many areas is that a Physics doesn't only teach you physics and maths, but also how to solve problems, and an impressive amount of data analysis, and most likely a fairly competent ability to program. Finance and banking are interested in your because of this, and accounting firms will take you on the promise of you completing the necessary exams.

In my department, several engineering firms and banking groups recruit directly from the graduate pools, and there are a few software companies that look out for us if any places appear.
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Dukeofwembley
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#16
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#16
you can even go into law

infact i saw a barristers chaamber where a member commented "if i can understand quantum physics then i should be able to understand law"
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Audioworm
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#17
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#17
(Original post by Dukeofwembley)
you can even go into law

infact i saw a barristers chaamber where a member commented "if i can understand quantum physics then i should be able to understand law"
If you think you understand quantum mechanics, you don't understand quantum mechanics
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nju
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#18
Report 9 years ago
#18
(Original post by Avshua)
I know people say with a Physics degree, it opens a lot of doors not only in science but out of it. Thing is i don't want a job related to science in any way simply because i don't really find it interesting.

I very much prefer to do more white collar jobs like accounting, banking etc. However, when i go on various large companies websites, they all say they require a degree in Accountancy, Business, Economics or related. Even some only say Maths, various types of Engineering, but NO Physics.

This has got me really worried, does a Physics degree really open dorrs to that many jobs?
My cousin did a physics degree and now she's working in investment banking. I hope this makes you feel more positive with your degree
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heyimbored
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#19
Report 9 years ago
#19
(Original post by strawcheese)
Physics opens massive doors. Theres such si much scope. Medical physics aerospace, mechanical. The maths aspects makes physics degrees favourable by employers. you can always do an MSc or PhD after which would boost your chances of employment. Inbox me if you want any further advice. I'm currently studyuing for my medicla aerophysics PhD.
Out of curiosity, what do you hope to do with that after your PhD?
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nabovokisbae
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#20
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#20
could we get some more info, that would be so so appreciated. thank you!!!
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