How would you define the 'New Right'?

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Off To The Races
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For me I'm confused as to what the difference is between the New Right and standard conservatism. Is the 'New Right' a branch of conservatism? Is it a political ideology? Could someone/people please explain for me without using a load of big words I won't understand? I'm studying it in sociology and so would really like to define it succinctly but not too simplistically.
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Machtpolitik
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Do you mean New Right, as in Margaret Thatcher and the Chicago School, or New Right as in the Nouvelle Droite/Neue Rechte ideological tendencies on the continent?
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ANARCHY__
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(Original post by Machtpolitik)
Do you mean New Right, as in Margaret Thatcher and the Chicago School, or New Right as in the Nouvelle Droite/Neue Rechte ideological tendencies on the continent?
So the OP is confused as to the meaning of New Right. Your solution is to bombard him with political terms he will likely have no comprehension of.

lol
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Aspiringlawstudent
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(Original post by ANARCHY__)
So the OP is confused as to the meaning of New Right. Your solution is to bombard him with political terms he will likely have no comprehension of.

lol
Chuckled a bit at this.

OP: do you mean what might be termed 'the libertarian right'?

People like Ron Paul, for example?

Or do you mean something else?
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wwelol
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david cameron
privatisation
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ANARCHY__
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(Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
Chuckled a bit at this.

OP: do you mean what might be termed 'the libertarian right'?

People like Ron Paul, for example?

Or do you mean something else?
Guessing he means Thatcherite and/or influence of the Chicago School on British politics just because it's in this forum but I could be wrong; OP did say he/she was confused.
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Off To The Races
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I mean the New Right which Thatcher seemed to embrace
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prog2djent
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Neo-liberalism (think thatcher economics) and a kind of half way house between traditionalist views and pop culture societal views, imagine what the average person on the street in the 50's thought about social issues compared to what most people think now. Half way between I'd say.

But I don't like the term "new right" because it is suggesting the right is linear, and there in only one schism along a time line, there are tens of differen ideologies. I mean, if they new right is supposed to be a modern split from traditional conservativism, then what is neo-conservativism, what about the "goldwater" conservatives around when traditional conservativism was popular, constitutionalism has been around for hundreds of years ...
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Machtpolitik
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(Original post by ANARCHY__)
So the OP is confused as to the meaning of New Right. Your solution is to bombard him with political terms he will likely have no comprehension of.

lol
Yes, well spotted. I should have read through his post thoroughly and I would have seen the reference to sociology.

I'm starting a sociology course soon. but as of yet my knowledge isn't too comprehensive. Though, I did come across this powerpoint presentation - http://www.slideshare.net/mrsclemmey...-the-new-right - that I thought was good for beginners.

My short analysis is that one, it see's man and society as the sum of economic activity; it places the economy at the centre of human life and the determining factor in our development. It believes in a laissez-faire? management of the economy - in other words, the government plays as little part in running the economy as possible. They see government intervention as a hindrance, not a help, because it distorts the market outcome and upsets the supply-demand scales.
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Off To The Races
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I think I've got an alright definition, tell me what you guys think:

Neoliberal and socially conservative ideology which influenced Thatcherism and Reaganism, and which heavily supports free-market capitalism and laissez-faire economics (believing that competition between private enterprises benefits consumers). New Right thinking aims to protect traditional moral values and views the nuclear family as the bedrock of society.
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Lukfisto
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There is no new right. It is the same right which tries to screw poor and middle class.

But if we want to split right wing, I think new right was born in 80s with Reagan and Thatcher.
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between_the_lies
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Isn't the New Right a new political framework that wants to leave the deadly 20th century ideologies which are based on paper truth not objective reality, behind.
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Pixie_Me
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The New Right is a conservative view (conservative in this case meaning to not like change). People who like the New Right idea don't like change and tend to stick to traditions (like that of the nuclear family). In other words they like the 'back to basics', the 1950s world is their ideal society. They link underachievement (or the uneducated) to high crime rates and don't like the idea of family diversity. I hope this helps.
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Davij038
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(Original post by Off To The Races)
For me I'm confused as to what the difference is between the New Right and standard conservatism. Is the 'New Right' a branch of conservatism? Is it a political ideology? Could someone/people please explain for me without using a load of big words I won't understand? I'm studying it in sociology and so would really like to define it succinctly but not too simplistically.
If you want to go into it more in depth this is s pretty interesting video: the new right were capitalist radicals and not conservatives.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5PA_mKWxQHE
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Off To The Races)
For me I'm confused as to what the difference is between the New Right and standard conservatism. Is the 'New Right' a branch of conservatism? Is it a political ideology? Could someone/people please explain for me without using a load of big words I won't understand? I'm studying it in sociology and so would really like to define it succinctly but not too simplistically.
The New right until recent years referred to the new neoliberal consensus brought about by Thatcher and Raegan among others in which we cast off the shackles of the state and embraced economic liberalism.

The New Right in recent years (also known as the alt-right) refers to the the counter culture which has formed in opposition to things like diversity and to a lesser degree social liberalism. It has a nationalist undertone and unlike Thatcherism has a protectionist streak.
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