Query on EPQ plagiarism

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    (Original post by stdomser)
    i appreciate the reply Djministe, thank you!

    i was always told by teachers that boards have special software to check for plagiarism, because EPQ is supervised by an exam board (i think) does it still mean its manually checked and not checked by using software?
    Generally these things are reviewed by software called turnitin. It's the same thing that unis use and personal statements are put through. The process takes about 9 minutes to compare your work to a large amount of data from books, journals, websites and essay banks. If you have correctly referenced you should have nothing to worry about. Like is said above they will probably give EPQs with a problem a glance over to check the program has worked correctly. I hope that helps.
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    I'm handing in my EPQ later this week, I used some journals some of which included quotes- if I use the quotes should I quote from the original source or the journal? Thanks
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    (Original post by xsem0)
    I'm handing in my EPQ later this week, I used some journals some of which included quotes- if I use the quotes should I quote from the original source or the journal? Thanks
    If you can track down the primary source, to check that it was correctly quoted in the secondary source, then you might only need to quote the primary source (depending on the context). Otherwise, it is necessary to cite both.

    Referencing systems will differ on the precise layout for a bibliography, but the pointers on this site might help:

    http://rdc.libguides.com/content.php...56&sid=1742094

    "Sometimes an author will quote work someone else has done, but you are unable to track down the original source. In this case, both the original and the secondary source must be listed in the note and the bibliography.


    If, for example, you were reading a book and the author of the book (in the example below, that would be Sarah Gwyneth Ross) made reference to the work done by another author (in the example below, that would be Astrik L. Gabriel), you would refer to the work as per the layout below.


    General Format

    Full Note: 1. Author First Name/Initial Surname [original author], Title (Place of
    Publication: Publisher, Year), page number, quoted in Author First Name/Initial
    Surname [the author of the book that refers to the thoughts/ideas of the
    other author]), Title (Place of Publication: Publisher, Year), page #.

    Concise Note:
    2. Author Surname [original author], Title, page #.

    Bibliography:
    Author Surname, First Name/Initial [original author]. Title. Place of Publication:
    Publisher, Year. Quoted in Author First Name/Initial Surname [the author
    of the book that refers to the thoughts/ideas of the other author]. Title.
    Place of Publication: Publisher, Year, page #.


    Example

    Full Note:
    1. Astrik L. Gabriel, "The Educational Ideas of Christine de Pisan," Journal of
    the History of Ideas 16, no. 1 (1995): 3-21, quoted in Sarah Gwyneth Ross, The
    Birth of Feminism: Women as Intellect in Renaissance Italy and England (Cambridge:
    Harvard University Press, 2009), 23.


    Concise Note:
    2. Gabriel, "The Educational Ideas," 3-21.

    Bibliography:
    Gabriel, Astrik L.. "The Educational Ideas of Christine de Pisan." Culture and
    Imperialism. Journal of the History of Ideas 16, no. 1 (1995). Quoted in
    Sarah Gwyneth Ross. The Birth of Feminism: Women as Intellect in
    Renaissance Italy and England. Cambridge: Harvard University Press,
    2009, 23."
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    (Original post by Holmstock)
    If you can track down the primary source, to check that it was correctly quoted in the secondary source, then you might only need to quote the primary source (depending on the context). Otherwise, it is necessary to cite both.

    Referencing systems will differ on the precise layout for a bibliography, but the pointers on this site might help:

    http://rdc.libguides.com/content.php...56&sid=1742094

    "Sometimes an author will quote work someone else has done, but you are unable to track down the original source. In this case, both the original and the secondary source must be listed in the note and the bibliography.


    If, for example, you were reading a book and the author of the book (in the example below, that would be Sarah Gwyneth Ross) made reference to the work done by another author (in the example below, that would be Astrik L. Gabriel), you would refer to the work as per the layout below.


    General Format

    Full Note: 1. Author First Name/Initial Surname [original author], Title (Place of
    Publication: Publisher, Year), page number, quoted in Author First Name/Initial
    Surname [the author of the book that refers to the thoughts/ideas of the
    other author]), Title (Place of Publication: Publisher, Year), page #.

    Concise Note:
    2. Author Surname [original author], Title, page #.

    Bibliography:
    Author Surname, First Name/Initial [original author]. Title. Place of Publication:
    Publisher, Year. Quoted in Author First Name/Initial Surname [the author
    of the book that refers to the thoughts/ideas of the other author]. Title.
    Place of Publication: Publisher, Year, page #.


    Example

    Full Note:
    1. Astrik L. Gabriel, "The Educational Ideas of Christine de Pisan," Journal of
    the History of Ideas 16, no. 1 (1995): 3-21, quoted in Sarah Gwyneth Ross, The
    Birth of Feminism: Women as Intellect in Renaissance Italy and England (Cambridge:
    Harvard University Press, 2009), 23.


    Concise Note:
    2. Gabriel, "The Educational Ideas," 3-21.

    Bibliography:
    Gabriel, Astrik L.. "The Educational Ideas of Christine de Pisan." Culture and
    Imperialism. Journal of the History of Ideas 16, no. 1 (1995). Quoted in
    Sarah Gwyneth Ross. The Birth of Feminism: Women as Intellect in
    Renaissance Italy and England. Cambridge: Harvard University Press,
    2009, 23."
    That's really helpful thanks very much
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    Sorry to bring a dead thread back to life but, if you are paraphrasing and you put an incorrect citation, on purpose or by accident, and you do this systematically, can you get caught?
    I am asking because I have incorrectly cited some sources, I cannot change the people I have given them credit to, because I don't know the original author, but I am going on the hopes that because you are paraphrasing, or putting into your own words, at this level, it wont be flagged up on their system. All quotes are currently correctly referenced. Thanks, I am pretty much done my epq and bricking it now,
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    (Original post by vuvuzela)
    Sorry to bring a dead thread back to life but, if you are paraphrasing and you put an incorrect citation, on purpose or by accident, and you do this systematically, can you get caught?
    I am asking because I have incorrectly cited some sources, I cannot change the people I have given them credit to, because I don't know the original author, but I am going on the hopes that because you are paraphrasing, or putting into your own words, at this level, it wont be flagged up on their system. All quotes are currently correctly referenced. Thanks, I am pretty much done my epq and bricking it now,
    Of course you can be caught. The whole reason for referencing is to show who the ideas originally belonged to, so by referencing the wrong person it will be obvious - and it will be classed as plagiarism

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    (Original post by Juno)
    Of course you can be caught. The whole reason for referencing is to show who the ideas originally belonged to, so by referencing the wrong person it will be obvious - and it will be classed as plagiarism

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    But how will they know, and how will they know it wasn't deliberate?

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    (Original post by vuvuzela)
    But how will they know, and how will they know it wasn't deliberate?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    It doesn't matter if it was deliberate or not. It's still plagiarism and will be treated as such.

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    You aren't answering my question. Plagiarism is plagiarism yes well done, but HOW will they know, especially with paraphrasing?

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    (Original post by vuvuzela)
    You aren't answering my question. Plagiarism is plagiarism yes well done, but HOW will they know, especially with paraphrasing?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I'm not giving you advice on how to cheat.

    If you can't understand how they will know, you clearly don't understand the point of referencing.

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    (Original post by Juno)
    I'm not giving you advice on how to cheat.

    If you can't understand how they will know, you clearly don't understand the point of referencing.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Ok chump, if you don't know you don't know. Nice try though kiddo

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    their is so many tool avaible but you can try this free online plagiarism tool that will help you to solve your problem
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    This is an old thread - now closed.
 
 
 
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