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wavingattaxis
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Yes, I'm one of those students.

I'm really looking into studying Medicine in the UK (Newcastle, Aberdeen, or Leicester?).. just because it takes a lot less time than the programs here. I mean, here in Ontario, I'd have to do a 4 year undergrad degree, do my MCAT, apply to a med school (where the odds of me getting in are very slim). If I get in - yay! 4 more years of schooling. If not, I'll either be working or doing my Masters and wasting more time trying to get into a medical school. Whereas, if I choose to go to the UK, I'll work my butt off during my last 2 years of high school and gather up my grades, extra curricular activities, enough hospital experience and hopefully, hopefully, HOPEFULLY get accepted into a good med program. Besides.. my parents are willing to do this (given that my grades are good).

Now, the only thing I'm concerned about is coming back to Canada after completing the degree. According to the Medical Council of Canada, I'd have to undergo several examinations and blow off more money.. before I can even take on a residency program. I have no idea how long that'd take, but I know it'll total up to a hefty amount of time.. where my decision to go overseas to study medicine in the first place was based on TIME. I'd have to come back to Canada and spend extra years (I may be wrong and exaggerating slightly) to do exactly what students, who have almost completed all of their medical education in Ontario, have done. So in the end, I'm even with them (after spending a lot more money, of course). Would it be worth it?

As cliched as it sounds, I really want to become a doctor. I volunteer at two different hospitals and I have never felt so at home (seriously). I work my butt off at school, I do different activities that I feel have bettered me as a person.. I just don't want to end up as nothing, you know? I'm getting differing opinions and views from university students here, doctors, parents.. it's honestly so overwhelming, especially since I have to make a decision soon.

Any thoughts? Either I stay here in Canada or go to the UK.. I have no idea what to do. I really don't.
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Zedd
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Regarding Scottish schools:
(Original post by Zedd)
Edinburgh won't consider you:
"Entry directly from high school will not normally be considered."
http://www.ed.ac.uk/studying/interna...qualifications

Dundee won't consider you:
"As a general rule applicants presenting qualifications from countries other than the UK or Ireland are expected to have attained these at a level sufficient for entry to medical school in their home country."
http://www.dundee.ac.uk/undergraduat...s/medicine.htm

I can't find anything about Canadian qualifications on the University of Glasgow website...

Based on their online prospectus St. Andrews and Aberdeen will consider you however Aberdeen only has 16 international places. St. Andrews does a dedicated Canadian entry programme but there are only 20 places on that course.
The odds of you getting into a Scottish med school are slimmer than slim tbh, but I'm sure the English and, in particular, the Irish medical schools will be much more accommodating. With that said, don't think that this will be a cheap route because from what I've heard it is anything but cheap.
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fallenangel
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Apple17 might be good person to speak to, can somebody quote her to attract her attention?

She's a Canadian applicant who is set to start medicine at Kings GKT.
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tallen90
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(Original post by Apple17)
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tallen90
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(Original post by Zedd)
Regarding Scottish schools:


The odds of you getting into a Scottish med school are slimmer than slim tbh, but I'm sure the English and, in particular, the Irish medical schools will be much more accommodating. With that said, don't think that this will be a cheap route because from what I've heard it is anything but cheap.
The silly thing is, even though it'll cost a fortune for OP to study in the UK, it'll probably cost more to study in America because he/she will have to do two degrees...just one degree on its own costs a fortune over there, and there's no guarantee that the first degree will get OP into a medical school. I can understand why he/she would be considering studying over here.
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GeoffreyDouglas
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(Original post by wavingattaxis)

Now, the only thing I'm concerned about is coming back to Canada after completing the degree. According to the Medical Council of Canada, I'd have to undergo several examinations and blow off more money.. before I can even take on a residency program. I have no idea how long that'd take, but I know it'll total up to a hefty amount of time..
The process of getting back to Canada will not take too much time for you as a Canadian citizen, you would after graduating be eligible to sit the MCCEE (this is an mcq evaluating exam for international medical graduates) after passing that exam you can apply for residency via the Canadian match program (carms). Once you start residency you will be at same level as Canadian medical graduates and will have to take 2 more exams also taken by cmgs (MCCQE1 and MCCQE2).

To save time, I think in Canada the internship year is incorporated into residency so don't bother sticking around for the foundation programme here because you will end up doing it again. The match process if i recall correctly starts around September and ends in March, so to avoid losing time you need to pass the MCCEE in the summer right after you graduate so you don't miss the match and end up doing nothing for a year. If it works out like that you would be in residency 6 months from graduating.

An important thing to consider before you make this decision is the fact that IMGs in Canada have a lower chance of matching to competitive specialties and can't apply to all the residencies available for match, they can only apply to IMG designated residency positions. So you'll be fine if you don't mind being a GP but if you have your heart set on being a surgeon or something like that you might want to rethink it.

I'm not 100% sure about the accuracy of all this info as i'm not Canadian but this is what i recall from looking into immigrating to Canada.
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Helloworld_95
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There's a program at St. Andrews designed for Canadian students, I think it's numbered A990. It basically puts you on the same level as Canadian grads as you do some of your clinicals in Canada.
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magichearts
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I personally think people should study medicine in the country they want to practice in as moving back and forth isn't the easiest thing (taking exams, getting registered, getting matched, etc). Yes taking the MCCEE isn't very difficult, but it's the whole process of waiting and getting matched. Being a Canadian citizen, it is obviously a lot easier to get matched than an IMG - so that's a bonus. If you are very keen in studying in the UK, I'd advise to open up your options as you will have to apply strategically (since you're an international student). St Andrews has a special program for Canadians, but it is a fairly new program so I can't comment very much on it. I'd just be a bit weary of it as it is new. Usually when things sound too good, it is probably too good to be true.

I would think very carefully as there are a lot of sacrifices you will have to make when coming to the UK. One obvious thing is the cost of coming over. On paper it sounds fantastic that you'll be studying Medicine straight from high school, but you will have to keep in mind that you'll be very far from home. You also may not get as much support as you want at the uni as you are an international student. But having said all of this - if I had to do it all again and pick whether to have gone to the US, stay in Canada, or go to the UK. I'd still pick going to the UK. I'm enjoying my time here, but it takes a lot of commitment. If you have any questions, feel free to pm me. I'm a Canadian and have been in the UK for 3 years now/in 4th year of Medicine.

Good luck!
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apple17
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(Original post by wavingattaxis)
Yes, I'm one of those students.

I'm really looking into studying Medicine in the UK (Newcastle, Aberdeen, or Leicester?).. just because it takes a lot less time than the programs here. I mean, here in Ontario, I'd have to do a 4 year undergrad degree, do my MCAT, apply to a med school (where the odds of me getting in are very slim). If I get in - yay! 4 more years of schooling. If not, I'll either be working or doing my Masters and wasting more time trying to get into a medical school. Whereas, if I choose to go to the UK, I'll work my butt off during my last 2 years of high school and gather up my grades, extra curricular activities, enough hospital experience and hopefully, hopefully, HOPEFULLY get accepted into a good med program. Besides.. my parents are willing to do this (given that my grades are good).

Now, the only thing I'm concerned about is coming back to Canada after completing the degree. According to the Medical Council of Canada, I'd have to undergo several examinations and blow off more money.. before I can even take on a residency program. I have no idea how long that'd take, but I know it'll total up to a hefty amount of time.. where my decision to go overseas to study medicine in the first place was based on TIME. I'd have to come back to Canada and spend extra years (I may be wrong and exaggerating slightly) to do exactly what students, who have almost completed all of their medical education in Ontario, have done. So in the end, I'm even with them (after spending a lot more money, of course). Would it be worth it?

As cliched as it sounds, I really want to become a doctor. I volunteer at two different hospitals and I have never felt so at home (seriously). I work my butt off at school, I do different activities that I feel have bettered me as a person.. I just don't want to end up as nothing, you know? I'm getting differing opinions and views from university students here, doctors, parents.. it's honestly so overwhelming, especially since I have to make a decision soon.

Any thoughts? Either I stay here in Canada or go to the UK.. I have no idea what to do. I really don't.

Hey you

(thanks fallenangel and tallen90 for quoting me here)

So, I am a canadian student (just finished OSSD and IB) who will be heading to KCL this fall. Now, personally, if you look at Ontario stats for med, they are horrendous on OMSAs and people don't get in for a variety of reasons: poor relative MCAT/GPA/interview and I did not want to do a biomed degree (I can't see myself if another other degree apart from sciences even though I confirmed Schulich on OUAC) then find out I am rejected from med school and my degree has very few options (pharamacy doesn't appeal to me) so I decided to go right out of high school. By the way, if you have specialized in the UK, you can get straight to practicing without doing the MCQEE although there is a fes of 520 bucks. If you wanna specialize here, it is tougher; however, people say if you are in good standing, nice MCQEE scores and have done clinical rotations/research, you are in a better spot. At the moment, we can specialize in UK; however, I can't pinpoint the situation 6 years later. I would really think about the risks on both sides: you may not get in after those 4 years or later on, you may have to apply to specialize in Canada due to UK visa rules and while some primary care specialties are relatively easier to find a residency in, some are really tough.
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apple17
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(Original post by magichearts)
I personally think people should study medicine in the country they want to practice in as moving back and forth isn't the easiest thing (taking exams, getting registered, getting matched, etc). Yes taking the MCCEE isn't very difficult, but it's the whole process of waiting and getting matched. Being a Canadian citizen, it is obviously a lot easier to get matched than an IMG - so that's a bonus. If you are very keen in studying in the UK, I'd advise to open up your options as you will have to apply strategically (since you're an international student). St Andrews has a special program for Canadians, but it is a fairly new program so I can't comment very much on it. I'd just be a bit weary of it as it is new. Usually when things sound too good, it is probably too good to be true.

I would think very carefully as there are a lot of sacrifices you will have to make when coming to the UK. One obvious thing is the cost of coming over. On paper it sounds fantastic that you'll be studying Medicine straight from high school, but you will have to keep in mind that you'll be very far from home. You also may not get as much support as you want at the uni as you are an international student. But having said all of this - if I had to do it all again and pick whether to have gone to the US, stay in Canada, or go to the UK. I'd still pick going to the UK. I'm enjoying my time here, but it takes a lot of commitment. If you have any questions, feel free to pm me. I'm a Canadian and have been in the UK for 3 years now/in 4th year of Medicine.

Good luck!
Heard the the A990 gives you clinical rotations in Alberta but when you graduate, you can't register with GMC or there is something fishy about it (not sure about all the details)
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Zedd
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(Original post by tallen90)
The silly thing is, even though it'll cost a fortune for OP to study in the UK, it'll probably cost more to study in America because he/she will have to do two degrees...just one degree on its own costs a fortune over there, and there's no guarantee that the first degree will get OP into a medical school. I can understand why he/she would be considering studying over here.
It really depends upon where they get their first degree from. I know a guy that got his first degree from a community college and then came across to Scotland to do his LL.B and in doing so he's saved a small fortune in tuition fees. On the down side he's paid a hell of a lot more on living costs than he would have if he stayed in Canada. So the OP really needs to weigh it up.
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wavingattaxis
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Thank you all so much for your input! I really do appreciate it.

(Original post by GeoffreyDouglas)
The process of getting back to Canada will not take too much time for you as a Canadian citizen, you would after graduating be eligible to sit the MCCEE (this is an mcq evaluating exam for international medical graduates) after passing that exam you can apply for residency via the Canadian match program (carms). Once you start residency you will be at same level as Canadian medical graduates and will have to take 2 more exams also taken by cmgs (MCCQE1 and MCCQE2).

To save time, I think in Canada the internship year is incorporated into residency so don't bother sticking around for the foundation programme here because you will end up doing it again. The match process if i recall correctly starts around September and ends in March, so to avoid losing time you need to pass the MCCEE in the summer right after you graduate so you don't miss the match and end up doing nothing for a year. If it works out like that you would be in residency 6 months from graduating.

An important thing to consider before you make this decision is the fact that IMGs in Canada have a lower chance of matching to competitive specialties and can't apply to all the residencies available for match, they can only apply to IMG designated residency positions. So you'll be fine if you don't mind being a GP but if you have your heart set on being a surgeon or something like that you might want to rethink it.

I'm not 100% sure about the accuracy of all this info as i'm not Canadian but this is what i recall from looking into immigrating to Canada.
Yeah, that's exactly what I found out after doing some heavy research. I guess I'm rather lucky because I don't really want to get into a complicated specialty! Thanks so much!


(Original post by Helloworld_95)
There's a program at St. Andrews designed for Canadian students, I think it's numbered A990. It basically puts you on the same level as Canadian grads as you do some of your clinicals in Canada.
I actually came across that program a while back and as appealing as it looked, I just don't think it's right for me. Plus, I'm pretty sure it's based in Alberta, and I'd really like to stay in Ontario.


(Original post by magichearts)
I personally think people should study medicine in the country they want to practice in as moving back and forth isn't the easiest thing (taking exams, getting registered, getting matched, etc). Yes taking the MCCEE isn't very difficult, but it's the whole process of waiting and getting matched. Being a Canadian citizen, it is obviously a lot easier to get matched than an IMG - so that's a bonus. If you are very keen in studying in the UK, I'd advise to open up your options as you will have to apply strategically (since you're an international student). St Andrews has a special program for Canadians, but it is a fairly new program so I can't comment very much on it. I'd just be a bit weary of it as it is new. Usually when things sound too good, it is probably too good to be true.

I would think very carefully as there are a lot of sacrifices you will have to make when coming to the UK. One obvious thing is the cost of coming over. On paper it sounds fantastic that you'll be studying Medicine straight from high school, but you will have to keep in mind that you'll be very far from home. You also may not get as much support as you want at the uni as you are an international student. But having said all of this - if I had to do it all again and pick whether to have gone to the US, stay in Canada, or go to the UK. I'd still pick going to the UK. I'm enjoying my time here, but it takes a lot of commitment. If you have any questions, feel free to pm me. I'm a Canadian and have been in the UK for 3 years now/in 4th year of Medicine.

Good luck!
I totally get where you're coming from, but at the end of the day, like you said, there are certain things we've got to sacrifice. And I think I've done a pretty good job of getting into that groove, haha.

(Original post by apple17)
Hey you

(thanks fallenangel and tallen90 for quoting me here)

So, I am a canadian student (just finished OSSD and IB) who will be heading to KCL this fall. Now, personally, if you look at Ontario stats for med, they are horrendous on OMSAs and people don't get in for a variety of reasons: poor relative MCAT/GPA/interview and I did not want to do a biomed degree (I can't see myself if another other degree apart from sciences even though I confirmed Schulich on OUAC) then find out I am rejected from med school and my degree has very few options (pharamacy doesn't appeal to me) so I decided to go right out of high school. By the way, if you have specialized in the UK, you can get straight to practicing without doing the MCQEE although there is a fes of 520 bucks. If you wanna specialize here, it is tougher; however, people say if you are in good standing, nice MCQEE scores and have done clinical rotations/research, you are in a better spot. At the moment, we can specialize in UK; however, I can't pinpoint the situation 6 years later. I would really think about the risks on both sides: you may not get in after those 4 years or later on, you may have to apply to specialize in Canada due to UK visa rules and while some primary care specialties are relatively easier to find a residency in, some are really tough.
Congrats on getting in! The goal for me is to be able to do my residency and postgraduate training in Canada; I've heard that many British Medical Schools don't really let international students stay for the Foundation Years and whatnot, so..

(Original post by Zedd)
It really depends upon where they get their first degree from. I know a guy that got his first degree from a community college and then came across to Scotland to do his LL.B and in doing so he's saved a small fortune in tuition fees. On the down side he's paid a hell of a lot more on living costs than he would have if he stayed in Canada. So the OP really needs to weigh it up.
I know, I know.
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apple17
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(Original post by wavingattaxis)
Thank you all so much for your input! I really do appreciate it.



Yeah, that's exactly what I found out after doing some heavy research. I guess I'm rather lucky because I don't really want to get into a complicated specialty! Thanks so much!




I actually came across that program a while back and as appealing as it looked, I just don't think it's right for me. Plus, I'm pretty sure it's based in Alberta, and I'd really like to stay in Ontario.




I totally get where you're coming from, but at the end of the day, like you said, there are certain things we've got to sacrifice. And I think I've done a pretty good job of getting into that groove, haha.



Congrats on getting in! The goal for me is to be able to do my residency and postgraduate training in Canada; I've heard that many British Medical Schools don't really let international students stay for the Foundation Years and whatnot, so..



I know, I know.
afaik, we are at the moment, allowed to do foundation years since they give us full GMC registration so w/o that, its kind of tough to practice. To be honest, magichearts will know the specialty process better than I do.
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Soap Pizza
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Apple, what was your average?
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Danyal94
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http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2139251
Hey guys, check out this thread and please answer the question if you can! I'm a Canadian applicant too
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Zedd
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(Original post by Danyal94)
http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2139251
Hey guys, check out this thread and please answer the question if you can! I'm a Canadian applicant too
No offence but did you even try to look? Here's the most popular thread for international applicants that you might want to post in: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1987385
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Sublatus
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There's an international course at St. George's, but the clinical years are in America.

It wouldn't be too hard for you to get into a British/Irish med school, but do bear in mind that there are aptitude tests to be taken (it's too late to register for the UKCAT, but you could try for the BMAT), and international fees in Britain are very high.
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Danyal94
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(Original post by Zedd)
No offence but did you even try to look? Here's the most popular thread for international applicants that you might want to post in: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1987385
My bad should have searched further, thanks for the link!
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virji4life
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Hi Magichearts. I am a Canadian who recently got accepted in a UK Medical School. I would like to followup to see how are you doing now. Did you successfully returned back to Canada? Thank you
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junior.doctor
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(Original post by virji4life)
Hi Magichearts. I am a Canadian who recently got accepted in a UK Medical School. I would like to followup to see how are you doing now. Did you successfully returned back to Canada? Thank you
The OP only ever made 2 posts, both 5 years ago, so I think it's very unlikely that you're going to get a response unfortunately.
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