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    Sorry for yet another type of these posts but this time it's slightly different...
    Basically, I've got offers for English Literature at Leeds, Manchester and Sheffield. I've chosen Leeds as my firm and Sheffield as my insurance. However, I've just received an e-mail from the Undergraduate Admissions tutor for Language and Linguistics Science at York. He offered me a place for course Q1Q3 which is a joint honours Linguistics/Literature degree. Now, many of you will know how unbelievably desperate I was to go to York and how gutted I was when I got rejected for Eng Lit so obviously this came as a huge surprise to me...at first I was like 'Oh my God, I'm gonna go to York' but after thinking about it, I wonder whether a Joint Honours is what I want? I mean, am I really prepared to change my course just for the sake of going to York?
    The entry requirements for this course are BBB whereas at Leeds, the Eng Lit course I got an offer for is AAB. Furthermore, it might be of interest that I want to train to become an English teacher after my degree and I'm not quite sure how a joint honours degree would fair with employers. The weight of the course is 200 credits linguistics and 160 literature. I do both Lit and Lang separately at A Level but have always been advised to do Lit at uni (even though I got a much higher A in Lang at AS level.)
    So meh...what should I do! It seems so tempting to say yes just because it's York and I would have literally killed to go there...
    But then again, would it be a waste of three years especially for somebody who wants to be a teacher?
    Any advice would be much appreciated. Thanks.
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    I don't think it would matter in regard to becoming a teacher whether you do English Lit or Lit/Linguistics - might even be better with the combined course as it gives you even greater breadth of knowledge. However, course is really important to if you wouldn't like to do linguistics then don't go to York but if it's just a question of your career as a teacher I don't think it will matter! Both are prestigious uni's - perhaps York slightly more so for English. Good luck whatever you decide.
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    this is a very academically shallow thing to say, but i've found that it's easier to get higher marks in linguistic modules for english; although you can write essays for it, the general concepts you need to grasp are more concrete than literary ones.
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    Considering the credit requirements sound quite strict, it might be difficult and frustrating studying less of your preferred subject than you'd like. Think about whether you would actually enjoy doing linguistics as a degree, since that'll be the majority of modules you're taking.
    Leeds is a great university, and in my opinion studying the subject you want to at a slightly less well recognised place is hugely better than having to spend most of your time studying something else. Plus there was a well creepy lit/linguistics guy in my seminar group last term. Eurgh.
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    I don't believe in changing your course just because you can go to a specific university... especially the University of York, when I went I wasn't very impressed with it. Also, you may want to be an English teacher now, but who says in a few years you wont have changed your mind and the single honours degree may be of benefit to you then. I think it is the general consensus that single honours degrees are better to have than joint honours. Good luck in making the right decision.
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    (Original post by tetedupet)
    I think it is the general consensus that single honours degrees are better to have than joint honours.
    Really? What makes you say that?
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    Well, surely a single honours degree allows more specialisation and focus in that degree... I find it bizzare that people can take odd combinations like history and geography. I suppose you could argue conversely though, that dual honours enables you to gain a greater variety of knowledge. I'm not entirely convinced myself.
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    (Original post by tetedupet)
    Well, surely a single honours degree allows more specialisation and focus in that degree... I find it bizzare that people can take odd combinations like history and geography. I suppose you could argue conversely though, that dual honours enables you to gain a greater variety of knowledge. I'm not entirely convinced myself.
    But for many degrees, particularly arts ones, the worth for employers is in transferable skills, not actual knowledge. My having studied an extra module in medieval literature is going to make no difference whatsoever to an employer in fields many English students go into such as publishing, journalism, teaching.
    What joint honours degrees do provide is extra training in time management and applying skills learned in one subject/area to the study of another, and indeed a greater variety of skills as well as knowledge.
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    It sounds to me like you just need to resolve with yourself whether or not your desire to go to York outweights your desire to do solely English Literature, and no matter how we help we can't answer these questions for you, "am I really prepared to change my course just for the sake of going to York?" Also, to me you sound like you want people to tell you to go to York, to justify what you want to do, "It seems so tempting to say yes just because it's York and I would have literally killed to go there...
    But then again, would it be a waste of three years!"
    . But hey, i may be wrong; the best of luck deciding, i'm sure you will be happy either way in the end PFL xx
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    whatever decision you make, i would say that linguistics is a very rewarding element of english, and would definitely complement literature study.
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    Also before you get carried away with making a decision, have you already replied to UCAS regarding your firm and insurance? Only you've mentionned it at the top of the thread and I'm not sure whether you can change your mind once you've replied to UCAS.
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    i know some1 doing that course at york, she likes it but i think the linguistics part is quite hard going...i think you'd have to have a passion for lanugage and the way it works if you do that course, which some people have, and if it interests you, it might be worth doing. Also, im doing a combined english course at york (english writing and performance) and although i can't speak for your particular course, i do get the chance to do quite a few 'eng lit' modues, so maybe its worth emailing the dept to see if it's possible you could in some way specialise in eng lit in yrs 2 and 3.

    On the other hand, leeds has an amazing looking course, and if its eng lit u really want to do, go there. Trust me, you don't want to be stuck somewhere doing a course you don't like. It'd make you very unhappy. So my advice would be choose the course over the place, and you'll have a great time wherever you go.
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    Hello, sounds like you have a really tough decision ahead of you, but I just wanted to say congratulations on getting the york offer in any case! Personally I would go for it if you still love the idea of york, but that's just me, anyway well done
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    (Original post by pinkfairylights)
    It sounds to me like you just need to resolve with yourself whether or not your desire to go to York outweights your desire to do solely English Literature, and no matter how we help we can't answer these questions for you, "am I really prepared to change my course just for the sake of going to York?" Also, to me you sound like you want people to tell you to go to York, to justify what you want to do, "It seems so tempting to say yes just because it's York and I would have literally killed to go there...
    But then again, would it be a waste of three years!"
    . But hey, i may be wrong; the best of luck deciding, i'm sure you will be happy either way in the end PFL xx
    Well basically my main concern is what would be considered the best degree to do English teaching with? My parents are saying that the LingLit course at York is a really low degree for people who can't get in for pure literature...because it offers BBB, they're saying that less people want to do it because it's a crap degree basically.
    I really don't know what to do. If you were an employer wanting to recruit an English teacher would you offer the place to somebody who has an undergrad in English Literature or and undergrad in Linguistics/Literature? (obviously both would have another year's PGCE postgrad.)
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    Could you accept the LingLit offer and then try to transfer on to the straight literature degree once you're there? Sneaky, but I know someone who used this method to get on to Warwick's ultra-competitive creative writing course. I don't know if it would work at all universities though.
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    Surely it wouldn't be a problem with teaching? It might even give you an edge if you wanted to teach A-Level as surely you'd be more qualified to teach the combined or straight Language A Level, as well as just Literature? Also I'm sure most places are crying out for good English teachers, so I don't think they'd worry too much about what your degree was if you were qualified to teach English. For example, one of the (A Level) Maths teachers in our school has a degree in Geography... If that doesn't matter then doing a joint honours can't be too much of a problem!

    I think go with your heart. If you enjoy doing English Language now, and the prospect of another three years of it excites you, or even just seems like fun, then go for it. If you can't see yourself studying it for another three years then don't. But don't choose institution over course- however good the university was, if you don't enjoy your course you're not going to have the best possible experience. All the people who have dropped out of my boyfriend's university did so because they didn't like their course and couldn't take any more of it, even though they loved the university and the life there.
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    (Original post by Affectation)
    Well basically my main concern is what would be considered the best degree to do English teaching with? My parents are saying that the LingLit course at York is a really low degree for people who can't get in for pure literature...because it offers BBB, they're saying that less people want to do it because it's a crap degree basically.
    I really don't know what to do. If you were an employer wanting to recruit an English teacher would you offer the place to somebody who has an undergrad in English Literature or and undergrad in Linguistics/Literature? (obviously both would have another year's PGCE postgrad.)
    Tbh I don't think an employer would care. Having a degree in linguistics shows that as well as having a good grasp of literature, you have an in depth knowledge about the way that language works which is important. Also atm there aren't enough teachers so someone with a degree from a good uni would defo get a good job. My religious studies teacher for example went to York and studied modern languages, but focussed her interest in religion for post grad and now has a job at a top London school. Don't worry about your future career, all that's important is that you want to study the combined course n whether you think you'd be happy at York.
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    I know I've asked this before and obviously everyone has a different opinion but what exactly is it about York that you love so much??? I really don't see the attraction. Also if this is any help I've accepted my lowest offer just because I preferred the place so don't feel guilty about doing that if you'd be happier at York than Leeds. In terms of employment, competition for positions as an English teacher is probably not that stiff. I know from my school I have one teacher who went to Bristol one from Sheffield Hallam and one from Hull and in actual fact the one from Hull is the best by far and is also deputy head. Then again we are a scummy state school .
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    (Original post by silence)
    this is a very academically shallow thing to say, but i've found that it's easier to get higher marks in linguistic modules for english; although you can write essays for it, the general concepts you need to grasp are more concrete than literary ones.
    when it comes to english linguistics, in particular, i think that the whole field doesnt account as a challenge. linguistics is anazing field, but english linguistics is not the most exciting thing to study, definitely

    to the OP - if you like linguistics go to York. but Leeds is also amazing. a friend of mine graduated from the lit department of leeds and she only has nice things to say about it.
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    Do you generally think employers would prefer somebody who'd done a pure Lit degree rather than a random joint honours one though?
    Actually, the one at Leeds isn't even pure lit, it's English Language and Literature but it's BA Eng whereas the one at York is BA LingLit.
    I just dunno how people would see a BA LingLit over a BA Eng.

    Also...what if I wanted to do something other than teaching for a little while? Would I have as much chance to do it with a joint honours english than single honours english?
 
 
 
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