Coping With the Course Watch

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Medic07
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I haven't even started medicine yet (and I won't for another 1.5 years!), but I can't help wondering if I'll cope with the course. Initially, everyone starts out really enthusiastic, and psyched to get into medical school, but (what I believe to be) a fairly significant number don't finish their degree. I hope I'm not one of them!

I'm not concerned that my year out will cause any problems. My concern is that it seems everyone who gets into medical school is extremely academically able, talented, etc... yet not all of them pass. Hmmmm.

Thoughts, anyone? Has anyone else ever thought this? I'm not doubting myself, just indulging my thoughts a bit here
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belis
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Most people who do not finish their course don't do so out of their own choice as they realise that it is not for them. Others fail due to serious personal circumstances. Medical schools do not want people to fail and there is usualy an opportunity to resit your exams if you fail the first time round or even repeat the year. There is a girl in my friend's PBL group retaking the year, although she almost never shows up to any of the classes... must be something to do with parents forsing her to do medicine. Also I don't think everyone who gets into medicine is extremly academicaly able. I certainly do not think about myself in that way. The course itself does not require you to be briliant, more like hard working and consistent with your studies. No matter how clever you are if you slack around it is not going to help you.
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Renal
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It's a little early for self doubt.

A small number of people do leave medical school. There are traditionally two peaks, in the first term when people decide that university is not what they want to do and in the third year when people decide that clinical medicine isn't for them. It's very hard to predict before hand who these people are, especially the latter peak. The only reasonably realiable indicator is whether there has been pressure applied to the person to study medicine, sometimes the person rebels, sometimes they hate it and leave, sometimes they really enjoy it.

An even smaller handful complete medical school and don't go on to practice medicine for whatever reason, some of these people may have started medical school with that intention others come to realise it later in the course, again it's very hard to predict who these will be at the beginning.

By far the largest number of people who leave are those who fail significant aspects of the course. This is extremely hard to do, especially after the first year. The only people who fail are those who want to. Nobody should have any difficulty passing medical school, the hardest bit is getting in.

The only advice I can offer is that if right now, you really want to do medicine and you can honestly see yourself as a doctor then there's no reason you shouldn't apply.

As for self doubt - it happens to pretty much everyone, don't worry.

Hope this helps.
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FruitcakeLiz
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Belis and Renal thank you very much- that is very good advice you've both offered there.
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Medic07
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Awww thank you both
I've actually already applied for deferred entry, and I've been accepted to 3 out of my 4, so I'm all set! I just remember that my remark above ^^ was brought up at an open day with a group of medical students, though no one answered it, and it kind of stuck with me. All very encouraging, mature advice from you- thanks again!
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Jamie
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(Original post by Medic07)
I haven't even started medicine yet (and I won't for another 1.5 years!), but I can't help wondering if I'll cope with the course. Initially, everyone starts out really enthusiastic, and psyched to get into medical school, but (what I believe to be) a fairly significant number don't finish their degree. I hope I'm not one of them!

I'm not concerned that my year out will cause any problems. My concern is that it seems everyone who gets into medical school is extremely academically able, talented, etc... yet not all of them pass. Hmmmm.

Thoughts, anyone? Has anyone else ever thought this? I'm not doubting myself, just indulging my thoughts a bit here
well you are going to have to change your views on what is significant before you become a doctor, else you'll be treating every blemish and tiny abnormality.
the numbe rof medics who 'don't make it' is so tiny as to almost be insignificant.
compare that with any other course...
Helenia
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So far, there have been only one or two that I know of who've changed subjects from Medicine because the subject wasn't right for them. There have been a slightly larger number who have changed subjects (usually to NatSci) because they failed certain parts and failed the resits. Really though, most of them have said they found they didn't really want to do medicine, or didn't like the Cambridge course, and so didn't prepare adequately - given the amount of time you get to prepare for resits, even if you screw up first time, there is little excuse for failing 2nd time. Haven't got to clinicals yet so I don't know if people will drop out.

If you want to do Medicine though, and it's your choice, not that of your parents, then go for it. If you've done your research on courses and universities, chances are you'll be happy.
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Fluffy
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(Original post by Helenia)
So far, there have been only one or two that I know of who've changed subjects from Medicine because the subject wasn't right for them. There have been a slightly larger number who have changed subjects (usually to NatSci) because they failed certain parts and failed the resits. Really though, most of them have said they found they didn't really want to do medicine, or didn't like the Cambridge course, and so didn't prepare adequately - given the amount of time you get to prepare for resits, even if you screw up first time, there is little excuse for failing 2nd time. Haven't got to clinicals yet so I don't know if people will drop out.

If you want to do Medicine though, and it's your choice, not that of your parents, then go for it. If you've done your research on courses and universities, chances are you'll be happy.
People have this idea of medicine being all 'ER'/'Scrubs'/'Holby City'... They forget about pre-clinical... It can be hard to motivate yourself through 2 years of relative academia, if all you want to do is get down and practical (oo er!)... Then there are all the exams...
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wednesburywench
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im finding it really hard right now, dont see how im ever going to pass...i have 2000 pages of lecture notes to memorise. sofar im halfway through with 2 weeks to go... but its not staying in my head. it depends where you go...i know bristols first yr is ridiculously hard, and someone in the yr above me said only 5 people in their year passed all of these exams first time...out of 270 people! so yea...encouraging stuff!
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Renal
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(Original post by wednesburywench)
i have 2000 pages of lecture notes to memorise.
Perhaps you're going about it the wrong way?

Why are you trying to memorise (verbatim?) lecture notes? All you need to do is know what you need to know to pass.
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wednesburywench
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ok then im not trying to memorise everything in them but i have 2000 pages to go over, and there is a lot of stuff. i duno what ur exams are like but ours are just stupid. they seem to expect you to memorise everything! i know basic principles but these seem not enough....pah. need 50% to pass with negative marked mcq section too.
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Comp_Genius
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(Original post by Helenia)
So far, there have been only one or two that I know of who've changed subjects from Medicine because the subject wasn't right for them. There have been a slightly larger number who have changed subjects (usually to NatSci) because they failed certain parts and failed the resits. Really though, most of them have said they found they didn't really want to do medicine, or didn't like the Cambridge course, and so didn't prepare adequately - given the amount of time you get to prepare for resits, even if you screw up first time, there is little excuse for failing 2nd time. Haven't got to clinicals yet so I don't know if people will drop out.

If you want to do Medicine though, and it's your choice, not that of your parents, then go for it. If you've done your research on courses and universities, chances are you'll be happy.
Surely you can get a first easily by learning ONLY MIMS and FAB (for example), then fail HOM completely. Then you are more likely to get a first in the first two. Then you have more time to just learn FAB. This works?
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Elles
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Darkenergy, check the small print? - for our preclinical distinctions as well as meeting the criteria in the necessary number of papers you have to pass every component at the first sitting.

So thoughts about coping with the course - intercalating is hard work.
& your medic & non medic support network of friends are pretty damn important at times..

</looming deadlines = pessimism!>
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Helenia
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(Original post by darkenergy)
Surely you can get a first easily by learning ONLY MIMS and FAB (for example), then fail HOM completely. Then you are more likely to get a first in the first two. Then you have more time to just learn FAB. This works?
You have to at least pass HOM, I think. Not a nice way to spend your summer anyway.
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Comp_Genius
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(Original post by Helenia)
You have to at least pass HOM, I think. Not a nice way to spend your summer anyway.
No then you can't resit to improve your result. :p: not that I want to fail - this is only hypothetical.

so if one fails HOM then he can 'resit', to get a higher mark?
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Fluffy
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(Original post by darkenergy)
No then you can't resit to improve your result. :p: not that I want to fail - this is only hypothetical.

so if one fails HOM then he can 'resit', to get a higher mark?
You get your resit mark? At most places, you can only get the basic pass mark for a resit, even if you ace it and get top marks...
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Comp_Genius
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Oh really? didn't know that....
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Jamie
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(Original post by darkenergy)
Surely you can get a first easily by learning ONLY MIMS and FAB (for example), then fail HOM completely. Then you are more likely to get a first in the first two. Then you have more time to just learn FAB. This works?
i have a, erm, friend who tried that tactic. He got a decent first in MIMS and FAB, and barely scraped a pass in HOM (was v.lucky didn't have to resit).
So two decetn 1sts and a 3rd.
total mark for the year? a high 2.2.
Comp_Genius
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Yes, but the trick is to fail HOM. Then you won't even get a third.
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Jamie
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(Original post by darkenergy)
Yes, but the trick is to fail HOM. Then you won't even get a third.
no, instead you'll have to come back a few weeks later and do another exam.
Push comes to shove you have to ask. Is it worth it?
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