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    I am a language arts teacher in San Diego, California, and I am working on a master's degree in
    educational administration. Having just returned from a wonderful holiday in London (what an
    incredible city!), I am writing a paper discussing education in the UK. It seems that every country
    has an education "language," and I am having some difficulty decoding yours! While we have
    "kindergarten," "elementary school," "junior high," and "high school," I see that the labels are
    quite different in the UK. Would someone please take a moment to point me to an online resource or
    answer a few of my questions? I would appreciate your help so much!

    Questions:

    What is the breakdown of the various levels before university? What ages are the students at the
    various levels? For example, in America we have kindergarten (age 5), elementary (ages 6-12, broken
    down into grades 1-6), junior high (ages 12-14, grades 8 and 9), and high school (ages 14-18, grades
    9-12 also called freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior years).

    How is English taught in England? In the United States we are moving away from teaching grammar as
    such (nouns, verbs, lists of helping verbs and prepositions, etc.). Do you continue to teach
    diagraming? At what level do you stop teaching grammar?

    Language arts teachers in the United States are required to teach writing, reading, literature,
    grammar, vocabulary, and spelling, all within the same class period (50 minutes). Do British
    teachers have more time to teach these skills?

    What are "A Level" and "O Level" exams?

    At what age are students allowed to leave school? Is there an exit exam? What must a student do to
    get into a good university?

    What is a typical school day schedule for teenaged students in the UK? For example, my 14-year-old
    students have seven 50-minute classes and a 30-minute lunch. We start each day at 7:40 and end at
    2:45. Students take English, math(s), earth science, Americian history, religion, physical
    education, and an elective class (choir, band, drama, or woodshop).

    What training is required for a British teacher? In America we are required to obtain a bachelor's
    degree and then spend one additional year in teacher training and practice teaching.

    How many students are in the average classroom in the UK? Is there any legislation to keep class
    sizes small? (In California special funding keeps class sizes at 20 for the first few years of
    school and in some English classes, though other classes have as many as 35 students.)

    Where do funds come from for public education in the UK? In the US public education is funded by
    local (maybe 40%), state (50%), and federal taxes (10%). Are many parents willing to pay for private
    education in the UK?

    Thank you so much for your assistance!

    Sincerely,

    Amy Cothran San Diego, CA

    Jeffcothran pondered...
    [q1]>It seems that every country has an education "language," and I am having some difficulty[/q1]
    [q1]>decoding yours![/q1]

    [q1]>What is the breakdown of the various levels before university? What ages are the students at the[/q1]
    [q1]>various levels? For example, in America we have kindergarten (age 5), elementary (ages 6-12, broken[/q1]
    [q1]>down into grades 1-6), junior high (ages 12-14, grades 8 and 9), and high school (ages 14-18,[/q1]
    [q1]>grades 9-12 also called freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior years).[/q1]

    In England and Wales: Nursery (non-compulsory), ages 3-5 (depending on local authority)
    - Reception age 4-5 (children start in year in which they are 5, sometimes at start of school year,
    sometimes at start of term, depending on local authority). Key Stage 1:
    - Year 1 age 5-6 - Year 2 age 6-7 Key Stage 2:
    - Year 3 age 7-8 - Year 4 age 8-9
    - Year 5 age 9-10 - Year 6 age 10-11

    Key Stage 3:
    - Year 7 age 11-12 - Year 8 age 12-13 - Year 9 age 13-14 Key Stage 4:
    - Year 10 age 14-15 - Year 11 age 15-16

    Sixth Form: ages 16-17 & 17-18

    Reception, Key Stages 1 and 2 are usually together, forming a Primary School. Nurseries are
    sometimes separate or sometimes part of a Primary School.

    Key Stages 3 and 4 are usually together, forming a Secondary School. Sixth Forms are sometimes
    separate or sometimes part of a Secondary School.

    Reception and Key Stage 1 pupils are historically known as Infants. Keys Stage 2 pupils are
    historically known as Juniors.

    Hope this helps. Scotland has different numbering system.
    --
    greebs

    To all who have answered my cry for help:

    Thank you so much! I'm understanding things much better now! I appreciate the time you all spent to
    send detailed answers to my many questions. I know they'll really help my paper.

    Sincerely,

    Amy Cothran

    In message <[email protected] t.cox.net>, jeffcothran <[email protected]> writes
    [q1]>To all who have answered my cry for help:[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>Thank you so much! I'm understanding things much better now! I appreciate the time you all spent to[/q1]
    [q1]>send detailed answers to my many questions. I know they'll really help my paper.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>Sincerely,[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>Amy Cothran[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    There are a few other things that are different about the UK educational system (she says, being a
    US citizen working & studying in UK HE....).
    [q1]:}[/q1]

    If your paper includes things like funding, training, quality control, etc., these, too, are
    different.... along with the way the curriculum is structured, the choices kids have to make and at
    what point, the fact of a national curriculum (now extending into HE) and so on.

    (N.B. I am not saying one way is better than another, before I fall prey to yells, screams, etc.,
    just that they are different....).

    --
    janet (yet another parent trying to get to grips with Options Evening... again).

    "greebs" <[email protected]> wrote in message news[email protected] co.uk...
    [q1]> Jeffcothran pondered...[/q1]
    [q2]> >It seems that every country has an education "language," and I am having some difficulty[/q2]
    [q2]> >decoding yours![/q2]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q2]> >What is the breakdown of the various levels before university? What ages are the students at the[/q2]
    [q2]> >various levels? For example, in America we have kindergarten (age 5), elementary (ages[/q2]
    6-12,
    [q2]> >broken down into grades 1-6), junior high (ages 12-14, grades 8 and 9),[/q2]
    and
    [q2]> >high school (ages 14-18, grades 9-12 also called freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior years).[/q2]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> In England and Wales: Nursery (non-compulsory), ages 3-5 (depending on local authority)[/q1]
    [q1]> - Reception age 4-5 (children start in year in which they are 5, sometimes at start of school[/q1]
    [q1]> year, sometimes at start of term, depending on local authority). Key Stage 1:[/q1]
    [q1]> - Year 1 age 5-6 - Year 2 age 6-7 Key Stage 2:[/q1]
    [q1]> - Year 3 age 7-8 - Year 4 age 8-9[/q1]
    [q1]> - Year 5 age 9-10 - Year 6 age 10-11[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Key Stage 3:[/q1]
    [q1]> - Year 7 age 11-12 - Year 8 age 12-13 - Year 9 age 13-14 Key Stage 4:[/q1]
    [q1]> - Year 10 age 14-15 - Year 11 age 15-16[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Sixth Form: ages 16-17 & 17-18[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Reception, Key Stages 1 and 2 are usually together, forming a Primary School. Nurseries are[/q1]
    [q1]> sometimes separate or sometimes part of a Primary School.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Key Stages 3 and 4 are usually together, forming a Secondary School. Sixth Forms are sometimes[/q1]
    [q1]> separate or sometimes part of a Secondary School.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Reception and Key Stage 1 pupils are historically known as Infants. Keys Stage 2 pupils are[/q1]
    [q1]> historically known as Juniors.[/q1]

    In our county, Lower is years 1 to 4, Middle is years 5 to 8 and Upper is years 9 to sixth
    form. ) j9

    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]> Hope this helps. Scotland has different numbering system.[/q1]
    [q1]> --[/q1]
    [q1]> greebs[/q1]

    In article <[email protected] e.co.uk>, greebs <[email protected]> writes:

    [q2]>>It seems that every country has an education "language," and I am having some difficulty[/q2]
    [q2]>>decoding yours![/q2]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q2]>>What is the breakdown of the various levels before university? What ages are the students at the[/q2]
    [q2]>>various levels? For example, in America we have kindergarten (age 5), elementary (ages 6-12,[/q2]
    [q2]>>broken down into grades 1-6), junior high (ages 12-14, grades 8 and 9), and high school (ages[/q2]
    [q2]>>14-18, grades 9-12 also called freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior years).[/q2]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>In England and Wales: Nursery (non-compulsory), ages 3-5 (depending on local authority)[/q1]
    [q1]>- Reception age 4-5 (children start in year in which they are 5, sometimes at start of school year,[/q1]
    [q1]> sometimes at start of term, depending on local authority). Key Stage 1:[/q1]
    [q1]>- Year 1 age 5-6 - Year 2 age 6-7 Key Stage 2:[/q1]
    [q1]>- Year 3 age 7-8 - Year 4 age 8-9[/q1]
    [q1]>- Year 5 age 9-10 - Year 6 age 10-11[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>Key Stage 3:[/q1]
    [q1]>- Year 7 age 11-12 - Year 8 age 12-13 - Year 9 age 13-14 Key Stage 4:[/q1]
    [q1]>- Year 10 age 14-15 - Year 11 age 15-16[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>Sixth Form: ages 16-17 & 17-18[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>Reception, Key Stages 1 and 2 are usually together, forming a Primary School. Nurseries are[/q1]
    [q1]>sometimes separate or sometimes part of a Primary School.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>Key Stages 3 and 4 are usually together, forming a Secondary School. Sixth Forms are sometimes[/q1]
    [q1]>separate or sometimes part of a Secondary School.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>Reception and Key Stage 1 pupils are historically known as Infants. Keys Stage 2 pupils are[/q1]
    [q1]>historically known as Juniors.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>Hope this helps. Scotland has different numbering system.[/q1]
    [q1]>--[/q1]

    LOL! I sent an email a couple of days ago.... prolly shoulda said something.

    ----------------------------------------------------
    Sandi

    Remove NoSpam to reply.

    In article <[email protected] n.co.uk>, janet <[email protected]> writes:

    [q1]>There are a few other things that are different about the UK educational system (she says, being a[/q1]
    [q1]>US citizen working & studying in UK HE....).[/q1]
    [q1]>:}[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>If your paper includes things like funding, training, quality control, etc., these, too, are[/q1]
    [q1]>different.... along with the way the curriculum is structured, the choices kids have to make and at[/q1]
    [q1]>what point, the fact of a national curriculum (now extending into HE) and so on.[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>(N.B. I am not saying one way is better than another, before I fall prey to yells, screams, etc.,[/q1]
    [q1]> just that they are different....).[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]
    [q1]>--[/q1]
    [q1]>janet (yet another parent trying to get to grips with Options Evening... again).[/q1]
    [q1]>[/q1]

    ROFL!! As a US teacher working in the school system, you have my complete and utter sympathies....

    ----------------------------------------------------
    Sandi

    Remove NoSpam to reply.
 
 
 
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