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    Right,
    Help !

    Im currently using UCAS Extra and have got an offer for History at MMU.
    Is History really as much work as everyone says ?
    How much work is there compared to other subjects ?
    Do existing students ever regret picking it due to the workload ?
    Is it easy enough to get through the work during monday - friday ?
    Are there a lot of Oral Presentations you have to give ?

    Thanks

    A worried 6th former ! :tsr2:
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    I terms of content it's not that much more difficult. If you do well at A-Level (and work hard at A-Level) you'll cope fine with what's put in front of you. You're pretty much developing exactly the same skills you used at A-Level.

    The biggest challenge is being left to your own devices. Learning to use large libraries and reading actively and effectively is essential. It's not as if anybody provides you with all the answers and you can just go away, remember it and reproduce the information in your own words. But you get used to that fairly quickly and it actually feels quite good to know that you are learning for yourself rather than leeching off some teacher.

    As far as workload goes, i can't really speak for the other Unis, but for me at Bristol i've found it fairly intense. For example, this year we've had to do 8 essays of 2,000-2,500 words plus a 4,000 word project which took up a hell a lot of my work time - so much so that i personally missed quite a few lectures. I've also had one 10 minute oral presentation to prepare and i spoke in a group debate which was sort of like a presentation. (I do know others that have done more presentations.)

    I remember someone telling me that for Arts subjects like history or english the work comes in waves, and largely that's true. I might have 2 weeks or so of relatively little work, merely going to seminars and lectures, maybe doing a couple of hours reading for seminars. And then all of a sudden i might have 3 essays in just over 2 weeks. Towards the end of last term, i pretty much worked all day everyday for 3 weeks - 2 weeks spent on the 4,000 word project, and a week doing another 2,500 word essay in for the same day. There was very little going out in those 3 weeks, let me tell ya.

    In short, i get my Uni mates saying, "God, you do no work - you lazy Arts students!" for about 2-3 weeks and all of a sudden they are saying, "Feck, do you ever have a break?" That's just my personally experience though. MMU could be totally different. Whereas i've done 4 essays per term (this year), i've heard of law students at JMU and history students at Birmingham only doing 2 per term.

    Do i regret my decision to study history? Not a chance. Tbh, although it's been hard work and although i'm really not looking forward to the exams, the course at Bristol has been one of the most enjoyable aspects of my Uni experience so far. I think that's probably a combination of my love for the subject and the quality of the course itself (which is great, as what i study seems to themeatically link into other modules of the course or things i've studied at A-Level.)

    The thing with the history workload is it's up to you how much you do or how seriously you take it. I enjoy the subject, i hate getting bad essay marks, i hate missing deadlines and i hate sitting in seminars not knowing anything - but that's counter-balanced by my love for my bed and the hall bar. At the end of the day, you do as much as you feel comfortable with getting away with. In theory you could knock off your 6-7 essays for the year in the first 2 weeks (doing them badly obviously) and then sit off for the year, missing lectures and blagging your way through seminars - hitting the books again in May to revise and bag your 40% pass. The workload will depend on the Uni and depend on you - a combination of how much is set and how much you feel like devoting to that work to develop yourself as a historian. As vague as that sounds, with Arts subjects, it's exactly the case.

    Basically, if you enjoy your history and if you're able to cope with the A2 workload then history at MMU shouldn't be a problem workwise.
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    Phil D that's really helpful for me aswell another undergrad as of october 06 thanks
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    (Original post by elvliz)
    Phil D that's really helpful for me aswell another undergrad as of october 06 thanks
    No problem at all.
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    My cousin's in his final year doing History at Bristol!! Though I'm not sure Phil D whether you'd know him as it's one big University! I think I'd really enjoy History, but I just hope the essays aren't as strict in how you answer a question as it is at A-Level as that's one of the things that's really annoying, same with English- too many Assessment Objectives and actually learning anything is restricted.
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    (Original post by cielo)
    My cousin's in his final year doing History at Bristol!! Though I'm not sure Phil D whether you'd know him as it's one big University! I think I'd really enjoy History, but I just hope the essays aren't as strict in how you answer a question as it is at A-Level as that's one of the things that's really annoying, same with English- too many Assessment Objectives and actually learning anything is restricted.
    No, at Uni you have a lot more freedom. The tutors recognise that there is more than one way to tackle a given question. As long as your answer is analytical and is backed up by plenty of evidence (and not just line after line of quotes from historians).

    As at A-Level, good essays are balanced and conclude by synthesizing the varying viewpoints in an intelligent manner. Unlike A-Level, there is more scope for putting a unique spin on a question or, including more unconventional ideas or making observations that take your question into slightly different territory. As long as your answer is clear, actually answers the question and you are economical with your words the sky's the limit.
 
 
 
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