Turn on thread page Beta

law after engineering watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    As my signature states, I will be studying electronic engineering this autumn. I don't think many people study engineering to be engineers these days; they become bankers and managers. I don't want to be an engineer either, and my chosen field would require a PhD too. I imagine that in areas like IPR and copyright a technical background would be sought after, as somebody has to read the papers (any scientific paper to the uninitiated reads like Greek). I'd like to do a 2 year course in law after my electronics degree. I'm interested if anybody has any advice for me on how to make this happen because I'm sure it is possible, it just requires a little more leg-work rthan for, say, a humanities graduate. Thanks.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I see no disadvantage if you are able to adapt properly after your engineering degree.

    In your case, I would imagine that you may have to brush up on writing skills, such as those on essays and critique. Also, be prepared to deal solely with text, rather than numbers and designs.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    People with science backgrounds regularly go into patent and hard IP work.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    There are science graduates on my CPE course. Some of them have found writing essays hard, but there's no reason at all why you shouldn't go for it!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by coughsyrup)
    As my signature states, I will be studying electronic engineering this autumn. I don't think many people study engineering to be engineers these days; they become bankers and managers. I don't want to be an engineer either, and my chosen field would require a PhD too. I imagine that in areas like IPR and copyright a technical background would be sought after, as somebody has to read the papers (any scientific paper to the uninitiated reads like Greek). I'd like to do a 2 year course in law after my electronics degree. I'm interested if anybody has any advice for me on how to make this happen because I'm sure it is possible, it just requires a little more leg-work rthan for, say, a humanities graduate. Thanks.

    It is possible. You can become a construction lawyer at a top law firm such as Pinsent Masons (Before they merged, masons was the contruction specialist) and they offer training contracts. Many in the construction team seemed to have had an engineering background.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    It is certainly not impossible. You will need to demonstrate that you have sufficient analytical skills and, as someone mentioned above, the ability to write well and express yourself coherently.

    A scientific background may well be useful in the IP field.

    As for Digitalparadox's post re: Pinsents - I don't see that any of their construction partners have an engineering background. What do you base your comment that "Many in the construction team seemed to have had an engineering background" on? I'm not trying to be awkward, but people tend to take comments like those as being gospel.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Oh my god but why bother doing a very demanding engineering degree if you don't intend on using it? Just do a Law degree at undergrad level.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by red_roadkill)
    Oh my god but why bother doing a very demanding engineering degree if you don't intend on using it? Just do a Law degree at undergrad level.
    er... because that degree might interest me? Some people do do their degrees for interest, it's not a ****ing gravy train to a job.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I just wouldn't do all the work required of an engineering degree if I wasn't gona be an engineer. It's a specialised course. It's like doing Medicine and then converting to Law. Waste of time and money.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by coughsyrup)
    er... because that degree might interest me? Some people do do their degrees for interest, it's not a ****ing gravy train to a job.
    if it interests u so much why dont u be an engineer?
    just a thought, less competition then a law career!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Personal interest vs benefits - coughsyrup, in your case, it would hinge on whether your choice of a legal career is absolute or tentative.

    If tentative, it may be well worth the finances for the sake of personal interest where this opens up engineering and other science careers as usual.

    If absolute on law, it's probably not as worth the engineering degree at the end of the day, because even if you specialise in science-related legal areas like intellectual property law, construction and the like, the extent of application of such knowledge is still confined (although substantially beneficial).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Blondie22)
    if it interests u so much why dont u be an engineer?
    just a thought, less competition then a law career!
    There's a difference between being interested in a subject in a purely academic sense and wanting to use this interest vocationally. I assume people study classics for a reason, and that reason can hardly be said to be job prospects.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: April 10, 2006

University open days

  • University of Lincoln
    Brayford Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 12 Dec '18
  • Bournemouth University
    Midwifery Open Day at Portsmouth Campus Undergraduate
    Wed, 12 Dec '18
  • Buckinghamshire New University
    All undergraduate Undergraduate
    Wed, 12 Dec '18
Poll
Do you like exams?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.