Turn on thread page Beta

Something you love, or something that'll give you a good career? watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Of course it'd be great to have both, but a lot of the time you can't. I think the majority of people will say do something you enjoy and I would too, normally. But lately I've been in two minds.

    Say, for instance, you were a keen actor and you really wanted to do theatre studies in university. You do your three years, have a fantastic time and when it's all over, if you're lucky, you get a great job. The problem is that a lot of people aren't that lucky. What'll probably happen is when you get your theatre studies degree, you'll end up with a crappy, probably low-paying job that you don't like. And then all that time spent in university doing something you enjoyed will be worthless.

    On the other hand, say you really wanted to do theatre studies but you choose medicine instead. It's not your dream subject, but at the end of it, you get a well respected, high paying job. Would that not be a better option?

    I don't know. I'd like your opinions on this. What do you think?
    Offline

    15
    Do you have any desire to do Medicine whatsoever? If you dont then dont do it! You need to work very hard and if you dont enjoy it and drop out surely you would have been better off doing Theatre Studies? If you get into a top university for theatre studies/drama do a joint honors with something like English or a language then if you dont manage to get a job acting you always have the other part of your degree to fall back on and you could do something postgraduate which would get you a great job?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Perhaps the best option would be to go with a course that combines both your passion plus the chance of getting a good job at the end of your uni studies?

    For example, I really want to study Music at University, but I don't want to teach, so my best option was to do a joint degree in Music and French. Languages are a very sought-after and transferable skill, and are particularly in demand following Europ-isation.

    You want to do Theatre Studies, so how about a Joint Degree with English, a language or something similar? Keele University has 100000s of joint degrees so why not search their site for ideas?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I've been wondering that lately and just decided to do the course I love...animal behaviour. Going to have such a low paying job probably but Id rather that than stuck in a desk job I'd hate.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I wanted to do fine art and just paint all day but the chances of actually making a living from it are very slim so instead im gonna do architecture... like others have said... go for a combination of getting a good job and something you have a passion for... or if your feeling brave take the plunge!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I had that dilemma too, but managed to combine something that I love with something that'll give me a good career
    Half a year ago I applied for PPE or Philosophy with Politics, but it was rather because I thought it was a good subject to study and it wouldn't be as boring as only politics or only economics. But after I got the offers (from unis I really like - Warwick, Durham...) I panicked coz even the thought about studying PPE for the next 3 years was horryfing to me. But there is sth that i'm fascinated with - Asia... I simply love it. Not a particular thing, but the whole of it. I love most of all Japan, second is China (including Tibet)... But Japanese studies aren't a good idea, coz Japan is becomeing less and less important, but China? China is a BIG (enormous!) and developing country. So I declined all my offers and applied through UCAS Extra for COntemporary European Studien and Chinese Studies and I cannot wait for the studies to beginn, I'm so excited about the subject!
    But if I couldn't combine love and career (lol!) I'd choose sth I love (now taht I know how it feels when you know taht you have to do sth you don't like)! I couldn't live doing sth that I think of as useless or boring or what I hate. I guess its better to do sth you love even if it doesn't give you that much money, coz if you love sth you are more likely to be really good at it!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Personally, I think I'm rather idealistic and would choose the option that you love...

    However, given the current graduate market, and your concerns, I think the other advice that has been given here is excellent... what not combine your passion for one subject, with another that you enjoy in order to ensure you have a worthwhile degree.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    I'm doing animation...

    Very hard to get a steady job in, but I couldn't take a desk job, too boring. And other courses I'd get bored in. So I'm being brave (possibly stupid...) and risking it.

    In a risky course like that, I think the best you can do is be great. If you really are the top of your field at your level then it'll push you far ahead of everyone else, obviously.

    So I have absolute 100% self confidence, about 90% is blind delusion but that's how I'm playing it. I'm doing illustration too so I have a chance at freelance work on the side while I pursue my dream job.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Luckily my chocen degree will provide me with both! I love playing sports and always loved PE in school, and have found that I really enjoy teaching it! So for 4 years I get to play and teach sports, then at the end of it I get paid to do what I love! Couldn't have worked out better :rolleyes:
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by fakeplasticsmee)
    I'm doing animation...
    Computer animation?
    I know a guy, who did comp anim and he is earning now REALLY A LOT of money...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    is animation that great? last time i went pinewood studios there were animators woking on 'captain scarlet' and they looked like they were in a slavery camp! they had huge potato figures which totally got me off animation. mind you i'm learning maya in my spare time
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by silens_fatuus)
    I've been wondering that lately and just decided to do the course I love...animal behaviour. Going to have such a low paying job probably but Id rather that than stuck in a desk job I'd hate.
    I hope you will be thinking the same way when you have a mortgage to pay or rent to pay.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I'd do something I liked, then fight to get lucky! :p:
    in the worst case you could always get a graduate job where it doesn't matter about subject or you could go in for teaching your subject
    or you could do a a crazy joint honours like fine art & economics or whatever
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Chose something I love (ancient history and anthropology), living in hope I can get a good job too!
    I just don't think I could stand 3 years (or more) doing a subject I didnt absolutely enjoy.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm doing Journalism, because it's the only thing I've ever wanted to do with my life. So luckily for me I get the best of both worlds; studying something I love and am interested in, whilst getting a good degree at the end of it. Although journalism is a really competitive industry, but there'll always be journalism jobs out there.. some of them crappy, yes, but it's a job! You gotta start at the bottom, as they say.

    I'd say that you should follow your heart and do something you'll enjoy, it's 3/4 years of your life after all. But the advice of doing a joint honours if what you really want to do doesn't provide a secure enough future, is excellent, so I'd go with that.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Would you say an English degree falls into the catagory of "doing something you love" or "getting a good job"? I love English but I'm a bit worried about the job prospects...
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    do something you love.
    you can always retrain, go back to university etc if your life is not going the way you want it to - but why not give your most loved subject a shot the first time round? i'm doing a degree in english lit, which doesn't lead to any sure-fire careers (i don't want to teach, for example, i want to write) but i would MUCH rather spend three years of my life doing something i love rather than three years doing something i hated, and risk dropping out, really hating the degree and getting depressed, not meeting any like-minded people...
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    My two eurocents:

    Whatever you want to do in your life, you should do it with enthusiasm!
    And you shouldn't feel the pressure of other people, it's your own, individual learning and working experience.

    But what does it mean to "do something you love"?
    The system of our society is full of things that we would normally not like, yet we have adapted ourselves to them, creating channels in order to love them.
    Did we choose in which family or society we wanted to be born in? No, but still we learn to love it - depending on how open-minded we are.

    How can you predict whether you will not start "loving" something that you totally despised in the past?
    You may have a totally wrong impression of the subject, invoked by stereotypes or the public image about the profession - and you may have a secret talent that you haven't discovered yet.
    I acknowledge that it's difficult to discover this right before deciding what to do at university, but who knows...?
    You can inform yourself at a deeper level about what other people are doing in the field, and - much better - try yourself! Try imagining yourself being right there in the middle of the fareer and discover what the experience gives to you - even if others don't like it!
    You may even discover that you have an innovative idea in a field you didn't like and dedicate yourself with full enthusiasm to realize this idea.

    Another question you should ask yourself is also whether you will love to do what you're doing now - or what you did in the first 17-19 years of your life - for the next 40-50 years.
    For example, my friends may call me a computer freak, a scientific genius - and I "love" those subjects in the sense that I live with those skills every day of my life (so far).
    But does this necessarily mean that that is my destiny? Does this mean that for the rest of my life I will be only in that field, without any other experiences or sparks of interest?
    (Personally, I would sincerely find it boring)
    Maybe it's only my individual nature, but I want to discover new things in my life, face new adventures and interests...

    I know, we all believe in the "one, unique love", but I don't think that this idea of love should also be applied to your skills/careers. I may love having and talking about sex with my girlfriend - all the time -, but I don't want to specialize in sexology [yet] just because of that.
    You get my point?

    I'm also aware that people change careers, but there should also be a little bit of challenge in what one chooses. "Go for the dark side" as some people say. I'm sure that there's always something you will pursue with enthusiasm in what can initially appear to be just a gray, boring, careerist,get-rich-quickly field.

    Another thing you should consider is the pressure from outside, society, employers, etc.
    For instance, someone really loves music, composing film scores, etc. and embarks on a career as a musician but she/he is constantly subjugated to the pressure of the commercial wishes of the public, or of her/his manager, or his clients - if he's a freelancer.
    Even if you choose a career that you "really love", you must still adapt yourself to the social system if you want to work for a secure life (unless, of course, you have rich parents; but that's another story...).
    This probably applies only to a range of subjects, especially where creativity is required, but I wanted to point it out.
    As I have written in other posts, there are numerous other restrictions to your actual desires if you enter a field!
    If you like to become a psychologist, there's the DSM-IV, and other regulations you must respect, although you may totally disagree with them.
    Actually, I have met many people who have started to totally dislike what they once loved because the professional conditions of what they loved were the opposite of what they expected.
    Of course, they continued to pursue the aspect they liked in their free-time, but they, too, don't enjoy the job much.

    Personally, despite not having completely decided what to do in university yet, I tend to believe that I (remember, this is only an opinion) should pursue something challenging that will be rewarded accodingly (also challenges are exciting as I said above!) - so that I can do what I love in my leisure time, where nobody has to force me what I have to do, where there's no pressure or commercial adaptation needed.

    As a family-friend put it in a quite exaggerated manner:"You like Role Playing Games and Fantasy? Why study Mythology? Study Finance and buy your own castle with all those dungeons!" XD

    To the OP:
    Two of the most respected authors-poets-dramaturgists of Germany were a natural scientist and a doctor respectively: Goethe and Schiller.
    They also had important roles in public administration.
    And there are many other artists who had a brilliant career in different fields, but are famous only for what they wrote.
    Maybe nowadays it's a bit hard to be a doctor and a successful actor at the same time... but let's not make a rule out of it.

    My conclusion:
    Yes, it's wonderful and challenging to make a successful career out of something you really love.
    But it's also an experience to learn to love something that you initially despised - in the end, it all depends on what your aim of life is (whether to buy some Castles for your RPGs or just become a mythology professor).

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I think thats excellent advice Entertainer, up to a point. I think an element of skepticism is necessary when choosing something that will take three years, or more, of your life. True doing what you enjoy may not lead to a rewarding career, either financially or emotionally. But being totally unrealistic isn't going to work either. For example no point training to be a doctor if you faint at the sight of blood, sure you might overcome it, but will you be the best you could be? I'd love to do astrophysics or something like that, fascinates me. But I struggle to grasp scientific principles and same with mathematics. Sure I could work extremely hard and get there eventually, but I will never be as good as people who grasp the subject easily. I will always be struggling. I'd rather strive to be the best at something I'm good at.
    That said I do fully appreciate your point about commerical pressures etc, and creating opportunities to do what you love in your free time. Work to live or live to work thats the dilemma.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I believe that if you choose a profession that you really love to do, it is quite possible to achieve with your job...This is because when you love what you do, you will strive for success, and with a bit of luck you will get your good career.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you like exams?
Useful resources
Uni match

Applying to uni?

Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Articles:

Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

Quick link:

Educational debate unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.