Which one of these is most overused and why? Watch

Poll: Which one?
Communist (6)
6.25%
Racist (52)
54.17%
Terrorist (25)
26.04%
Fascist (13)
13.54%
Lawz-
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#41
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#41
(Original post by wacabac)
Here's some definitions for you:

Race: A group of people united or classified together on the basis of common history, nationality, or geographic distribution: the German race.

or; Race: Humans considered as a group.

Racist: racially discriminatory.

So if you were to make a negative remark about a group of people based on their common culture, then yes, you are being racist.
interesting you left out the primary definition:

"A local geographic or global human population distinguished as a more or less distinct group by genetically transmitted physical characteristics."

Most people use the term racist in that manner. Most people hear "racist" and they think discrimination on the basis of ethnicity.

Technically, yes, being prejudiced towards Oktoberfest and Sourkraut could be racist ... but it is rarely used as such.
0
reply
wacabac
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#42
Report 12 years ago
#42
From Answers.com:

"The biological aspect of race is described today not in observable physical features but rather in such genetic characteristics as blood groups and metabolic processes, and the groupings indicated by these factors seldom coincide very neatly with those put forward by earlier physical anthropologists. Citing this and other points—such as the fact that a person who is considered black in one society might be nonblack in another—many cultural anthropologists now consider race to be more a social or mental construct than an objective biological fact."

(Original post by Lawz-)
Most people use the term racist in that manner. Most people hear "racist" and they think discrimination on the basis of ethnicity.
Maybe that's your own perception, I really don't think that you can speak on behalf of the entire human race. I, for one, disagree with your comment.

(Original post by Lawz-)
Technically, yes, being prejudiced towards Oktoberfest and Sourkraut could be racist ... but it is rarely used as such.
No it couldn't because neither Oktoberfest, nor sauerkraut are considered races. Also, an argument stating that usage of a word is less frequent therefore incorrect is an invalid argument; how often does anyone use the word antidisestablishmentarianism? Rarely. Is it invalid as a word? No.

Out of interest, do you consider yourself to be a racist?
0
reply
Lawz-
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#43
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#43
(Original post by wacabac)
From Answers.com:

"The biological aspect of race is described today not in observable physical features but rather in such genetic characteristics as blood groups and metabolic processes, and the groupings indicated by these factors seldom coincide very neatly with those put forward by earlier physical anthropologists. Citing this and other points—such as the fact that a person who is considered black in one society might be nonblack in another—many cultural anthropologists now consider race to be more a social or mental construct than an objective biological fact."
Since I'm talking about the colloquial use, the scientific definition is not really relevant.


(Original post by wacabac)
Maybe that's your own perception, I really don't think that you can speak on behalf of the entire human race. I, for one, disagree with your comment.
I would contend that the vast majority of people - if you asked - What is your race? Would not answer - German or British, or Dutch - they would say white or black or Asian...

In the US - all the forms that record RACE which boxes to tick list ethnicities. It is very much the common conception...


(Original post by wacabac)
No it couldn't because neither Oktoberfest, nor sauerkraut are considered races. Also, an argument stating that usage of a word is less frequent therefore incorrect is an invalid argument; how often does anyone use the word antidisestablishmentarianism? Rarely. Is it invalid as a word? No.
What? THis makes no sense.

If I were to comment on those aspects of GERMAN culture - then according to you I would be racist wouldnt I?

I dont really see what your second point has to do with anything. When I refer to the way the word is used I am refering to a use according to the FIRST dictionary definition - there is nothing incorrect about it. I am not saying your use is INCORRECT - I am saying that people do not generally mean that when they use it, and I am concerned with what people MEAN not what they COULD mean.


(Original post by wacabac)
Out of interest, do you consider yourself to be a racist?
No - why do you ask?
0
reply
Ethereal
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#44
Report 12 years ago
#44
I know it isn't in the poll so this may be somewhat irrelevant, but I think "tragedy" and "tragic" are over used.
0
reply
wacabac
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#45
Report 12 years ago
#45
(Original post by Lawz-)
Since I'm talking about the colloquial use, the scientific definition is not really relevant.
How does that make sense? All colloquialisms have a definition. Answers show that "race" has varying definitions, there isn't a "right" one. The quoted text shows that the term race has become more undefined.

(Original post by Lawz-)
I would contend that the vast majority of people - if you asked - What is your race? Would not answer - German or British, or Dutch - they would say white or black or Asian...
I can appreciate that, but it doesn't change the face that racism comes under all kinds of guises. If someone were to discriminate against Muslims, wouldn't that be classed as racism?

(Original post by Lawz-)
What? THis makes no sense.

If I were to comment on those aspects of GERMAN culture - then according to you I would be racist wouldnt I?
My comment was merely stating that one wouldn't be prejudiced against sauerkraut or Oktoberfest, one would be prejudiced against Germans or Germany, which could be demonstrated by making comments about their culture or gross generalisations about the German people.

(Original post by Lawz-)
I dont really see what your second point has to do with anything. When I refer to the way the word is used I am refering to a use according to the FIRST dictionary definition - there is nothing incorrect about it. I am not saying your use is INCORRECT - I am saying that people do not generally mean that when they use it, and I am concerned with what people MEAN not what they COULD mean.
The first dictionary definition isn't the only definition. I'm sure a lot of people would regard racism as discrimination or prejudice against religion, nationality other defining features of a group, not just skin colour.
0
reply
Beekeeper
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#46
Report 12 years ago
#46
None of them are overused. They all handle very sensitive and very serious political and societal issues, and the more they are used the better, provided they are used appropriately.
0
reply
Lawz-
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#47
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#47
(Original post by wacabac)
How does that make sense? All colloquialisms have a definition. Answers show that "race" has varying definitions, there isn't a "right" one. The quoted text shows that the term race has become more undefined.
My point is a simple one - peopl euse the term race generally to refer to skin colour. Scientifically race may be next to meaningless - but in common usage it has meaning.

(Original post by wacabac)
I can appreciate that, but it doesn't change the face that racism comes under all kinds of guises. If someone were to discriminate against Muslims, wouldn't that be classed as racism?
No Considering that Muslims are not a race.

(Original post by wacabac)
My comment was merely stating that one wouldn't be prejudiced against sauerkraut or Oktoberfest, one would be prejudiced against Germans or Germany, which could be demonstrated by making comments about their culture or gross generalisations about the German people.
Then you have misunderstood my original point about culture.

My point was that many people use the word racist against people who attack a cultural aspect, rather than a RACIAL one. Oktoberfest has nothing to do with race, it is a cultural pehnomenon.

(Original post by wacabac)
The first dictionary definition isn't the only definition. I'm sure a lot of people would regard racism as discrimination or prejudice against religion, nationality other defining features of a group, not just skin colour.
Well as I said - if you ask someone - "what race are you" very very very few would tell you German if they were.
0
reply
Lawz-
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#48
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#48
(Original post by Beekeeper)
None of them are overused. They all handle very sensitive and very serious political and societal issues, and the more they are used the better, provided they are used appropriately.
by Overused I meant used improperly
0
reply
wacabac
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#49
Report 12 years ago
#49
(Original post by Lawz-)
My point is a simple one - peopl euse the term race generally to refer to skin colour. Scientifically race may be next to meaningless - but in common usage it has meaning.
In your opinion. I remember discussing usage of the word "race" at school and we concluded that it wasn't necessarily a specific term.

(Original post by Lawz-)
No Considering that Muslims are not a race.
If you ignore all but one of the definitions of "race".

(Original post by Lawz-)
My point was that many people use the word racist against people who attack a cultural aspect, rather than a RACIAL one. Oktoberfest has nothing to do with race, it is a cultural pehnomenon.
Well then I think we have to agree to disagree about usage of the word race, and thus, racist. But I don't think you can decide on one definition, different people will agree with either of us.

(Original post by Lawz-)
Well as I said - if you ask someone - "what race are you" very very very few would tell you German if they were.
*yaaaaaaawn* how many times do you want to repeat this point? Just because people may not respond "German" to being asked what race they are, doesn't mean that racist can't be used for a term about someone who discriminates against Germans. However, you would disagree, what would you classify someone who did as?
0
reply
judi_lover
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#50
Report 12 years ago
#50
(Original post by phawkins1988)
I agree completely. The word "communist" is often just used due to its emotional baggage to attack socialist or anti-free market ideas. It's not that different to the reducto ad hitlerum fallacy in that respect, in-so-far as the emotional baggage associated with the term is used in replace of valid argument.
and often those doing the attacking don't actually know what Communism and Socialism is all about!

Racism is a term used the most, because its in the public eye more now, but Racism is still a HUGE problem in today's world.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Brexit: Given the chance now, would you vote leave or remain?

Remain (1283)
79.74%
Leave (326)
20.26%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise