Guide 2: Washing your car Watch

Ynox
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#21
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#21
brushes will scratch the crap out of your paintwork. Far better to hand wash.
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pghstochaj
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#22
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#22
(Original post by viciouscircle)
All these fancy techniques, I feel like a country cousin using my AutoGlym shampoo conditioner and car glass polish. I think I'm gonna head to Halfords and invest in something to make my wee black mini gleam .

Out of interest, why are car washes bad???
As above about car washers, leads to "cobwebs" - look at paintwork next time. Also can damage bits of trims, aerials etc.

Anyway, autoglym shampoo condition is good stuff so don't be hard on yourself, as is cleaning the windows. If you look at a car which is clean sometimes it never looks quite right, until you clean the windows and then "wooow!".

However, I feel that certain colours deserve to be paid attention to, and that includes black. Black can look really dull and shows up every little scratch and nick. Maybe I should do a thread on touching up marks, hmm! Back to my main point; with black, time and effort really shows!
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davemarkey
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#23
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could u make a thread on touching up scratches? please

i have a major scratch on my rear door and one on the bonnet :mad:
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pghstochaj
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#24
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#24
Sure, will have it online tonight, as with my car washing information, it is all from experience and I am NOT a professional, despite having this experience.
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Ynox
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#25
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#25
touching up scratches-

firstly clean crap out of it. If rusty apply something like hammerite kurust.

Then build up the colour a layer at a time, leaving it for a while between coats until it is slightly protruding from the paintwork.

Then sand this back flush with 2000 grit wet and dry paper (use wet).

Then if metallic/pearlescent- apply clear coat in a layer or two.

Again, flat this with the 2000 grit.

Then buff up with an abrasive polish to make the repair look shiny.

Then wax etc.

Its an art but not too hard to do. Halfords/your car dealership can supply the paint needed/cutting compound but for 2000 grit you may need a more specialist place. Its worth it though.
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pghstochaj
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#26
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#26
Problem with using with 2000 wet and dry is that you are going to do harm to your surrounding paint work which it typically isn't worth doing. It can help the blend in of course.
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rhythm_bandit
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#27
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Wat car colour requires the least maintenace?
If its white, then wats the next colour that requires the least maintenance?
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pghstochaj
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#28
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(Original post by ant1337)
Wat car colour requires the least maintenace?
If its white, then wats the next colour that requires the least maintenance?
Question is difficult since it's probably green or blue which (in most shades) don't show much dirt, however, the darker you go, the more scratches and stone chips (etc.) show up. Neither colour does it for me though (except some light pale blues) so my suggestion is Silver.

Silver shows dirt, no doubt about it, but typically, unless there are dirty and clean bits (i.e. finger marks etc.) you don't tend to notice it, only when you clean do you see it's filthy. My father's car is silver so I know all about that lol. Silver - even if it is the hardest shade to colour match - is also a close colour to most primers so typical stone chips and scratches aren't obvious except close up.

Hope that helps. I don't like white, you tend to get weird marks where water usually goes on the car and often they won't even polish out.
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*soph*
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#29
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#29
Thanks for the guide - have just washed, dried and polished my car inside and out for the first time. It looked absolutely beautiful but now it's raining! :mad:
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pghstochaj
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#30
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lol, sorry to hear that. Nice thing about once you have polished it, you will find that the water beads off in a much better fashion than normal; more so with a good wax. A polished and waxed car in the rain looks much better than a badly looked after car.
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OMGWTF
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#31
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If you can. Get RainX, rain will bead up on your windscreen and fall off, its great. Unless it's really heavy you can get away with no wipers on the motorway with a decently RainX'd screen
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pghstochaj
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#32
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#32
Does it actually work? i.e. do you use it? I don't tend to believe that sort of thing normally...
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OMGWTF
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#33
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Yeah I use it. Basically, it's a mix of alcohol and something of some sort. You cover the screen in it, let it mist the screen, buff it in, then do it once more and it's done. Obviously you need to do it on a clean screen in the shade. But it's well worth it.

It lasts a while, I used to dread using the washer jets in the sun because they'd make marks but with RainX it's fine.
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davemarkey
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#34
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(Original post by OMGWTF)
If you can. Get RainX, rain will bead up on your windscreen and fall off, its great. Unless it's really heavy you can get away with no wipers on the motorway with a decently RainX'd screen
Do your wipers still work ok after applying RainX?
Because i've heard that RainX causes the wipers to judder and not work smoothly :confused:
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silent ninja
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#35
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I found durashine autopolish extremely good. the shine is absolute quality and is very easy to apply, no buffing. My bro got it after one of those commercials. I was pessmisitic but water really does slide off you car in sheets after it has been applied, so the shine looks spotless.
I wish they'd sell the autopolish on its own though.

http://www.jmldirect.com/product.php?cid=4&pid=14
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davemarkey
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#36
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#36
Have a look at the video on this website:
How to use the 2-bucket method to wash your car

It shows you how to wash your car 'properly' - a bit excessive but you can still get some tips.
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OBScene
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#37
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After using an industrial pressure washer from work to wash my car, I can safely say it beats any other way! Blast all the dirt off, wash it by hand and then blast all the streaky soap water off! Lovely shine any my hubcaps look like new! Maybe best not to use an industrial pressure washer though - I managed to blast off a couple of flakes of paint from the wheel arch too!
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Lara C.
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#38
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#38
SPONGES SCRATCH THE PAINT WORK!!!! USE A MIT!!!
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gbduo
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#39
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no they don't, don't be silly.

Unless you drop the sponge on a gravel/mud then they won't scratch your paintwork. Same would happen with a mitt.
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240920
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#40
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I think the point is that mitts trap the dirt and gravel deeper in the weave, whereas sponges keep the dirt on the surface of the sponge, so its more likely to damage the paint- even very small grains of dirt, gravel etc.
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