Turn on thread page Beta

Learning to cook! watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Over the summer I've made it my mission to learn how to cook, before I end up at uni living on noodles and toast
    Can anyone reccomend me some cookbooks you've actually used, and are easy to follow please? They don't have to be designed for students either
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    The ones designed for students are simple and easy to follow and have the bonus of only including dishes which don't cost a fortune to make. There's always the cheaper option of just watching your mum.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I learned to cook on my own, it's really simply like doing equations.
    Animal product + starchy food + veg + sauce = meal
    You then have to work out the best way of cooking and combining whether it be a curry, bolognese, sandwich or jacket potato.

    I've never got on well with cook books. :p:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I've found something like delia smiths complete cookery course helpful for example when i wanted to cook roast beef and stuff it told me how and when to cook thinks and it also hase lots of normal things + some fancy stuff in. Its not the most basic of books but there are many simple recipies for everything and if you practice a bit before you go to uni u'll be fine
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Fantastic idea -- i definitely intend to learn how to whip up basic dishes before I head over for university.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Also watch something like ready steady cook, stuff like that is good for ideas
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I've found that most student cookbooks are pretty rubbish. Between us as a flat we have a fair few lying around in the kitchen, and of course they are good for looking in sometimes to get some ideas.
    My advice- learn how to make bolognase, cook rice properly, cook pasta properly, fry up chicken and add sauce, and cook vegetables properly. With that you can pretty much survive! Lots of things you will probably buy pre-prepared anyway, like lasagne just isn't worth making in the time and effort department when you can buy one for 79p.
    A good idea is to watch your mum, and get her to write down recipes for some of your favourite meals. You'd be surprised how many people don't know how to make simple things like pancakes (we had to google the recipe for it on pancake day haha!)
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    i liked begginers by the 'australian women's weekly'. -> generaly all of their books are very easy to follow and have some really nice recipes.
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    PS Reviewer
    If you join the messageboards at MSE, particularly the moneysaving old style board, there are lots of ideas for cheap and easy recipes there!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by djk_99)
    Lots of things you will probably buy pre-prepared anyway, like lasagne just isn't worth making in the time and effort department when you can buy one for 79p.
    :eek: :eek: But you can make any sauce you buy in a jar vey easily and it'll be better
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cobra)
    :eek: :eek: But you can make any sauce you buy in a jar vey easily and it'll be better
    Yeah, true, I didn't say everything! But sometimes when you've had a full day of lectures, you come back and you just want to chill out, putting a lasagne in the microwave is the way to go. Or if you want something to eat quickly before you go out.
    And (although I've never tried) making a curry sauce seems a lot more difficult and time consuming than just adding one from a jar... And the ones in the jar taste good to me!
    From what I've experienced, students like to eat healthily, but still like foods that are quick and easy to prepare. And obviously cheaply- if you are preparing food for one a lot of time its cheaper to buy stuff (such as lasagne) than make it!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sunday)
    Over the summer I've made it my mission to learn how to cook, before I end up at uni living on noodles and toast
    That is cooking!
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I've just been watching my mum cooking and helping out making tea most nights. Then if there's something with bits to do that I know I'd forget I write them down in a recipe book I've bought.

    It's at least going to be useful for ideas even if I don't stick exactly to the recipe. When left to my own devices all I can think of making is pasta and beans on toast :rolleyes:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Learn how to make the basics: pasta, rice, sauces etc.. However, it also useful just to help out whoever is cooking tea, see how they do things. Also learn to experiment and improvise.
    Offline

    0
    Not trying to sound funny here, but some of you are very intelligent people (good a levels etc) and you can't cook.

    Cooking really is simple, build the foundations, simple dishes such as Shepherds Pie, Fish Bake, Sweet and Sour Chicken, Spaghetti Bolognese/Carbonara. Then take these further, adapt and learn more intricate dishes. Keep experimenting. Anyone can follow a recipe but it's adapting the recipe using the ingredients you have.

    Maybe I'm looking at it very naively, and after doing a 250 page coursework on how busy people/students can follow dietary adive , but really anyone can cook.

    Learn the basics, then expand.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    http://books.google.com/books?ie=UTF...YJS2clmGTuYKPE

    That book looks OK, not sure if it is or not though. You can find it on Amazon for about a fiver.

    EDIT: Click "More results in this book" to see some of the recipes and other pages.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by KerriT)
    The ones designed for students are simple and easy to follow and have the bonus of only including dishes which don't cost a fortune to make. There's always the cheaper option of just watching your mum.
    That's what I've started doing, and then volunteering to help with cooking. Also has the bonus of earning you brownie points with your parents
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I've started tryin to do some cooking in the house. Although, yesterday, making brekkie, bacon and eggs...

    1. Search for pan
    2. Ask mum for a pan
    3. Put in too much oil
    4. Pour some out
    5. Put in bacon
    6. Put in egg
    7. Burn hand
    8. Stick egg to bottom of pan
    9. Break egg
    10. Shout for mum!
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    http://s1.amazon.co.uk/exec/varzea/t...607149-9577438

    Get this book. It has absolutely everything you could possibly need in it, from the most basic to the most complicated recipes.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    My boyfriend and I are making one meal a week for his parents. Also, his mum will be making us a recipe book cause she cooks well, but simply.

    So far we've done spag bol, gammon steak with veggies, and this week it's guiness and steak pie.

    I cook with mum at the weekends (when we make proper food) and can now make most of her curries quite easily. Mmmmmm.

    My advice? Make things you can freeze down and eat for 3 days in a row!
 
 
 
Poll
Do you like exams?
Useful resources
Uni match

Applying to uni?

Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Articles:

Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

Quick link:

Educational debate unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.