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who is doing GCSE AQA English spec. B? watch

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    Anyone??

    I cannt find any ..and i mean any revision guides for the "best words" poems book. How are other people that have taken this spec. or those that are currently taking it going to do about this??

    Any help please..
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    I am - Hi!

    Basically, I'm in the same boat. Can't find anything!
    However,I'm doing my course by home study, so I've got a study pack to help me.

    Is there anythind specific I could help with?

    Wippa
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    good to know...is your study pack electronic??..as it can you send it through e-mail..or is it hard-copy..

    Also what grade are you looking for this section of the paper, and how are approaching to revise this section..??

    All help appreciated.
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    I'm so sorry for the late reply

    Unfortunately, the pack is paper-based, and quite useless for revision really. I'd like to aim as high as possible grade wise - I got an A* in English Language last year, but this is something quite different!

    I've decided to just annotate my own copy of the best words, stating all of the technical facts like rhyme, structure, metaphors, etc along with how the poems made me feel, what they're about and so on.

    Which section are you studying for the exam? My coursework was based on pre-1914 poetry, so I'll be doing post-1914 poetry in the exam. At least it narrows it down to 14 poems we have to revise...

    Sorry once again for the delayed reply - won't happen again
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    Hi! I'm doing the post 1914 poetry in Best Words as well!

    I'm stuck on one of the poems?
    Could anyone please help me with the poem, Afternoons by Philip Larken?

    Help much appreciated!
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    (Original post by greenfry)
    Hi! I'm doing the post 1914 poetry in Best Words as well!

    I'm stuck on one of the poems?
    Could anyone please help me with the poem, Afternoons by Philip Larken?

    Help much appreciated!
    I'm doing post 1914 too! Like you, I don't have a revision guide so I'm just going by the notes I took when we had a class discussion on these poems months ago... I wish I had some way of knowing whether what I've written is 'right' or not...

    Anyway, the poem 'Afternoons' is an insight into the monotonous, depressive side of marriage (or at least marriages of a certain class: words such as 'estateful' and 'skilled trades' indicate that the marriages referred to in the poem are working class.) It also stresses the inadequacy of life, an endless cycle where people are simple born, marry, give birth and die. Each person's path in life is already set out for them. The afternoons are described as 'hollow', a word with negative connotations that relates to a time of waiting. 'Afternoons' is a metaphor for this period in the mothers' lives - it is a time of waiting for something to happen. There is an extended metaphor of the military e.g. mothers 'assemble' and husbands stand at 'intervals' - this highlights the uniformity of their lives - they are all the same, and must do what is expected of them. The recreation ground is simply a microcosm of society. There is a certain irony to the line 'setting free their children': are the mothers really setting them free, when they are locked in a world that has already planned their lives out for them? The romance has gone from the lives of these women, and their wdding day - perhaps even their whole marriage - is now nothing more than a collection of photos 'lying near the television.'

    This poem is mostly about women, and it's interesting to note that the fathers seem to mostly be part-time (standing 'at intervals'). The main themes in 'Afternoons' are time, age and parenthood. You could compare it with 'Mirror' by Sylvia Plath (a poem about lost youth) or 'The Sick Equation' by Brian Patten (a poem looking at the effects of growing up in a broken family.)

    Hope I helped a little bit... my notes are all a bit of a mess really! I have a LOT of revision to do before Tuesday
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    I was wondering if anyone could help me with finding links between the post-1914 Best Words poems? I seem to have lost the bit of paper where I wrote down key themes and stuff Just, which poems go together and would be good for making comparisons?
 
 
 
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