Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Magistrate watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    If one wishes to become a barrister would it be a good idea to become a magistrate. Would this impress on the CV? Could it be interpreted negatively? I can't see anything wrong with doing it but just want to get some others input.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    I can't see how it would be an advantage. Have you looked in to what Magistrates do?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ethereal)
    I can't see how it would be an advantage. Have you looked in to what Magistrates do?
    Yes

    Great awareness of court procedings be it Magistates courts
    Sense of fairness
    Logical mind
    Analytic skills
    Commitmment to justice and the law
    Dealt with people from a varity of backgrounds (v important for criminal law barristers)
    Able to follow legal arguments well
    'People skills' - discussing with other magistrates - team work
    Initiative (how many young magistrates are there???)
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    How old are you?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ethereal)
    How old are you?
    20
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    There's no garuntee you would be called even if successful at interview, and it might affect your studies anyway.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ethereal)
    There's no garuntee you would be called even if successful at interview, and it might affect your studies anyway.

    It's only a min of 26 half days per year and chances are I would be called - nothing ventured nothing gained.
    PS why did you ask my age?

    Also why did you think it would not be an advantage? You now seem to be taking a different tact i.e you might not get it and even if you do it will affect studies.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hampshire)
    It's only a min of 26 half days per year and chances are I would be called - nothing ventured nothing gained.
    PS why did you ask my age?

    Also why did you think it would not be an advantage? You now seem to be taking a different tact i.e you might not get it and even if you do it will affect studies.
    He asked your age because before not long ago you had to be over a certain age to be a magistrate (and im not even sure the enabling legislation has yet come into effect, so the age limit may actually still exist). I contest your assertation you would be called; the fact you are barely old enough to be tried in a magistrates court yourself might just preclude you, as will the fact that you will be coming to the applications board with no substancial knoweldge of life or the world in general. As far as i know, the fact you are (i assume) a law student may also count against you; the entire point of the magistrates is that they know no law, thats what the clerk is there for.

    To be honest (and im talking brutal, here) i don't think you'll get it in the first place, and even if you do, i think it will be frowned upon. The general idea people have of their career path in law is Training, Practice, Partner/QC, Bench. The idea of going into judgement first, and then going to the opposite side of the bench to plead later, is one that fills me with a strange feeling that i can't quite put my finger on. But my feeling tells me its bad, and i trust my feelings.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Crazy Mongoose)
    He asked your age because before not long ago you had to be over a certain age to be a magistrate (and im not even sure the enabling legislation has yet come into effect, so the age limit may actually still exist). I contest your assertation you would be called; the fact you are barely old enough to be tried in a magistrates court yourself might just preclude you, as will the fact that you will be coming to the applications board with no substancial knoweldge of life or the world in general. As far as i know, the fact you are (i assume) a law student may also count against you; the entire point of the magistrates is that they know no law, thats what the clerk is there for.

    To be honest (and im talking brutal, here) i don't think you'll get it in the first place, and even if you do, i think it will be frowned upon. The general idea people have of their career path in law is Training, Practice, Partner/QC, Bench. The idea of going into judgement first, and then going to the opposite side of the bench to plead later, is one that fills me with a strange feeling that i can't quite put my finger on. But my feeling tells me its bad, and i trust my feelings.

    You can now be 18. The fact that alot of people in magistrates courts are young men would be a plus not a hinderance after all in this day and age people are obsessed with being representative. Substantial knowledge of life? Depends what you've done not how old you are - for example if someone was a volunteer worker, active in local politics etc and so knew the community well. Also i'm not a law student.

    What's your experience of deciding magistrate applications?

    Frowned upon by who? Chambers? Could you give me a reason rahter than feeling. I trust reason not emotion. Furthermore being a magistrate is not a career step in the same way as doing BVC is - i think you give it TOO much importance. It's a small extra curricular point not a stepping stone.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I don't have any relevant experience of magistrate apps (hope i didn't give the impression :p: ). And as far as i know, although the government may say all it wants about representative benches, on the subject of age, the bench itself is far from in agreement. If you don't believe me, Bystander at The Magistrate's Blog is just one example; he is rather amusingly scathing on the matter. And although you may trumpet on about how you trust 'reasons not feelings', when it comes down to it, its a very untraditional way to gain experiance for a very traditional profession, and i don't think its wise. It could be the fact that you are approaching it as though its just another hobby to add to your CV- if someone, after a short go in marketing or whatever, became a magistrate and said, "wow, this law stuff really turns me on, i wanna be a lawyer", i don't think i'd have a problem with that. But you approach it as though it's just another way to gain experiance of the legal system, but, at the end of the day, it's not; it's a judicial appointment by the Queen (via the Lord Chancellor) which will give you a great deal of responcibility, and i think you should treat it as such. It is certainly not "small extra curricular point".
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I don't have any relevant experience of magistrate apps (hope i didn't give the impression :p: ). And as far as i know, although the government may say all it wants about representative benches, on the subject of age, the bench itself is far from in agreement. If you don't believe me, Bystander at


    This is speculation based on one blog (also which post?).


    The Magistrate's Blog
    is just one example; he is rather amusingly scathing on the matter. And although you may trumpet on about how you trust 'reasons not feelings', when it comes down to it, its a very untraditional way to gain experiance for a very traditional profession, and i don't think its wise.
    Trumpet on? I said it once - sorry for being rational. I take it you accpet, from what you've said above, that such an opportunity would 'gain expereince' be it untraditional way - IMO a sign of initiative. Since when is expereince, be it traditional or not, a bad thing?


    It could be the fact that you are approaching it as though its just another hobby to add to your CV- if someone, after a short go in marketing or whatever, became a magistrate and said, "wow, this law stuff really turns me on, i wanna be a lawyer", i don't think i'd have a problem with that.
    So i take it that you don't think it would damage one's CV if I was to later try to be a barrister? Is that the case? I seem to reember you saying that you had a 'feeling' that it would not look good (or to that effect)


    But you approach it as though it's just another way to gain experiance of the legal system, but, at the end of the day, it's not; it's a judicial appointment by the Queen (via the Lord Chancellor) which will give you a great deal of responcibility, and i think you should treat it as such. It is certainly not "small extra curricular point".
    I don't JUST see it as another point for the CV. I never said that. Rather i see it as a good thing for the CV and something I would enjoy and take seriously. I just never mentioned the latter as motivation for becoming a magistrate is not the subject of the thread rather how would it look on the CV. The above motives are not mutually exclusive.

    It is a small extra curricular point with regards to a CV - its something mentioned in passing unlike say getting a first. I am not suggesting its a small extra curriculr point overall just in comparision to the steps needed to become a barrister. Do you see the distinction?



    You say it's unwise but WHY? I'm not suggesting that I would only do this and no mini pupillages, mooting etc. Is it unwise because it's not traditional? If so what's the problem since i would have done the traditional things such as mooting.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hampshire)
    Yes

    Great awareness of court procedings be it Magistates courts
    Sense of fairness
    Logical mind
    Analytic skills
    Commitmment to justice and the law
    Dealt with people from a varity of backgrounds (v important for criminal law barristers)
    Able to follow legal arguments well
    'People skills' - discussing with other magistrates - team work
    Initiative (how many young magistrates are there???)
    Most of which can be gained on your degree with the addition of suitable extra corriculars.

    I doubt a 20 year old who's experience of life is school and university would be called, but that's just my opinion.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Most of which can be gained on your degree with the addition of suitable extra corriculars.
    You think? Which one's do you think would not apply - i can see quite a few.

    I doubt a 20 year old who's experience of life is school and university would be called, but that's just my opinion.
    I never said my expereince is just school and university - big assumption. You want to be a solictor?
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Calm down fella.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by chalks)
    Calm down fella.

    Why do you say that? I just want people to qualify statements - if they are going to say something i think they should be preapred to back it up.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Which one of those can't you get through degree and suitable acitivites?

    As for my assumption regarding your experience, it's not really that big an assumption truth be told. At 20 it's likely your life experience is limited. That's not to be harsh, it's simply to be truthfull. Also, if you are looking to being a magistrate in order to develop analytical skills, people skills etc than arguably you do not posses the skills required to be a magistrate in the first place.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Look, this is going nowhere. If you want to apply to be a magistrate, do so- we can't stop you after all. But (i say, summing up unilateraly) we think you won't get in, are risking taking an unusual step that might back-fire and are being unusually cavalier towards the importand public post that a Justice of the Peace is.

    Finally, you realise that when/if you become a legal professional you will be ineligable to sit on the bench? The state is (if you get accepted) going to spend lots of money training you into becoming a magistrate for you to bugger off into the legal profession in a few years.

    Anything to add, Etheral?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    No. All I would add is, "rounds on me mongoose and chalks. guinness?"
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    You seem to be getting yourself awfully worked up about the whole thing. That doesn't bode well for being a magistrate.

    People's concerns seem to be twofold:

    (a) what is your motivation for applying to be a magistrate? Is it to impress potential employers or because it is a "good thing" to do?

    (b) are you likely to be called? Although the age threshold has been dropped, I would be surprised if a 20 year old became a magistrate. With the greatest of respect, I wouldn't want you passing judgment on me. I would be surprised if you have the maturity and life experience necessary to undertake such a responsibility. I certainly wouldn't want to do it and I have an 11 year head start on you.

    That said, if you were to be appointed then I don't see that it would be a disadvantage to a career at the bar.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Which one of those can't you get through degree and suitable acitivites?
    You can get them all through degree and extra curricular. Only some from a degree. But the extra curricular point is my whole point - a magistrate would gain the following:

    Great awareness of court procedings be it Magistates courts
    Sense of fairness
    Logical mind
    Analytic skills
    Commitmment to justice and the law
    Dealt with people from a varity of backgrounds (v important for criminal law barristers)
    Able to follow legal arguments well
    'People skills' - discussing with other magistrates - team work
    Initiative (how many young magistrates are there???)

    Your argument seems to be that you can get the above from other activites but you have not shown why those activites are superior. After all you admit a magistrates experince can prove the above.

    As for my assumption regarding your experience, it's not really that big an assumption truth be told.
    Yes it is. In order to know the truth it helps to know about the person you are talking about.

    At 20 it's likely your life experience is limited. That's not to be harsh, it's simply to be truthfull.
    Everyone's expereince is limited but it depends in what areas. For example by the age of 20 one could have done vol work, politcal work, travelling, know local politics etc.


    Also, if you are looking to being a magistrate in order to develop analytical skills, people skills etc than arguably you do not posses the skills required to be a magistrate in the first place.
    Emphasis on the word develop.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: April 10, 2006
Poll
Do you like carrot cake?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.