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    It was on the front page of the Sunday Telegraphy today that Oxford are now introducing a new exam for applicants for English at Oxford 2007.
    It's basically to distinguish the more able and gifted students as the popular belief that A-levels are too easy nowadays (:eek: ).

    The mentioned article can be found here:
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main...09/noxon09.xml

    I wonder what you all think of it? I guess its bad news but then again the other most popular subjects have their own special admissions tests- LNAT, BMAT, STEP, HAT so could it have been that it was only a matter of time before Oxford had to introduce this new measure?!

    NB/ I am not concerned with applying for Oxford nor English, but I saw the article and felt it was my responsability for sharing this news with other fellow TSR members!
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    Just a little correction...the History Aptitude Test (HAT) is done by Oxford...and they have been talking about an equivalent one for English for a least a year, some even said they would have had it for the 05/06 cycle... not unexpected considering the popularity of English.
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    (Original post by sophisti_kate)
    Just a little correction...the History Aptitude Test (HAT) is done by Oxford...and they have been talking about an equivalent one for English for a least a year, some even said they would have had it for the 05/06 cycle... not unexpected considering the popularity of English.
    Whoopsie- i'll correct the thing about HAT!

    It probably doesnt come as a great shock but just in case there were some out there who wern't aware
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    Thanks anyways,
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    Don't fear it, people. Admissions tests are scary, but look at it this way: it makes it easier for them to decide who deserves a place. If you're right for Oxford then having more tests gives you more of an opportunity to prove yourself and them to make a well-balanced and informed opinion. You still might be rejected - but you'll have been rejected fairly.

    Oh, and in my experience the charge that rich schools can 'coach' for these tests is unfounded. They demand you to read closely and be imaginative with the stuff you are given. Utterly unpredictable - if you'd been coached for the HAT you'd collapse in a worry over not having been prepared for an un-preparable exam.
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    ^ I actually liked the HAT, because it was different from ALevels and was the sort of rambling nonsense that I could get away with...
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    (Original post by sophisti_kate)
    ^ I actually liked the HAT, because it was different from ALevels and was the sort of rambling nonsense that I could get away with...
    /\ agreed. it made you think, which was rather exciting, rather than reproducing all the tedious stuff copied from an a-level text. if a place at oxf hadn't been riding on it, it would have been quite enjoyable...
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    It's not that A-levels are too easy, they're just less relevant. A-levels started off as entrance tests for universities but these days their a form of assessment across the national school leaving population, so it's no wonder they're less effective at differentiating the top, say, 1% of that. I think the current situation is far better than 20 years ago, when A's were just beyond the vast, vast majority of people even in their best subject.

    It does mean, however, new techniques are needed to select. Oxford are to be entirely aplauded for making the investment in developing these tests, as well as interviews, while other universities get ever poorer in selecting students, relying as they do on ever less relevant academic indicators, biased references and personal statements of questionable originality.
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    Yeah, I didn't really "take" to Alevels and the formulated styles of questions - at least I could show my breadth and range and perceptions and actually get marks for my interpretation...
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    (Original post by sophisti_kate)
    Yeah, I didn't really "take" to Alevels and the formulated styles of questions - at least I could show my breadth and range and perceptions and actually get marks for my interpretation...
    just out of interest....what do u actually have to do for the hat...is it an advanced paper on the syllabus u have studied?
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    http://www.history.ox.ac.uk/prosunde...troduction.htm

    You can find old papers here
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    Now that i've done mine (LNAT) I must say i quite approve of admissions tests, as having done it, i'm rather convinced they are fair, and, as is touted, immune to coaching. It's a shame that, because it helps determine something as important as your Oxford acceptance, people will try anyway (my school and i did, but admittadly only to a slight extent). However, the fact that i think this could just be down to the fact that i did quite well on it!
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    well my first thought was "noooooo!", because i'm reapplying. But, actually, aptitude tests are a very fair way of assessing our potential; less easy to "prepare" for, thus fairer, and great for those who freak out in interviews *stay positive* xx
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    A good Oxbridge applicant, should relish the entrance test as an opportunity to prove themselves further. I embraced it and prepared gruilingly.

    This provides a person predicted AAA to outshine somebody predicted AAAAAA!
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    (Original post by bluefuture)
    A good Oxbridge applicant, should relish the entrance test as an opportunity to prove themselves further. I embraced it and prepared gruilingly.

    This provides a person predicted AAA to outshine somebody predicted AAAAAA!
    precisely. x
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    I like the admissions tests for quite a few reasons:

    1) They really do not rely on preparation, and so make the whole applicatin process a lot fairer. I remember going into the test panicking cos everyone else was discussing all the past papers they'd done beforehand (and some even got given extra exam-style questions by their teachers), whilst my preparation consisted of trying to look at one in the car on the way to Oxford, and giving up after 2 questions cos I couldnt concentrate on it.

    2) If you get an offer it makes you feel less like you just blagged your way in through flukey interviews and the lies/jokes you told during them. You almost feel like you might actually deserve your place.

    3) For tests taken at interview like maths, it makes a great icebreaker, as everyone comes out and bonds over how awfully it went (as it invariably does for everyone).
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    (Original post by bluefuture)
    A good Oxbridge applicant, should relish the entrance test as an opportunity to prove themselves further. I embraced it and prepared gruilingly.

    This provides a person predicted AAA to outshine somebody predicted AAAAAA!
    Yeah - I met someone who got 8As at AS, apparently. Turns out he didnt get in.
 
 
 
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