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Denning ... watch

  • View Poll Results: Denning ...
    Socially conscious genius
    19
    65.52%
    Pain in the rear who added reems to contract syllabus
    10
    34.48%

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    Today's comedy poll brought to you by Ethereal...

    Denning ... genius of social justice or raving nutter who extended the contract syllabus by 2 thirds?
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    Both; ergo, I abstain.
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    LOL Profesh, never occured to me to give the 3rd option.
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    (Original post by Ethereal)
    LOL Profesh, never occured to me to give the 3rd option.

    tut tut
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    I like Denning Fortunately a lot of his ideas are not good law (otherwise nobody would really know what the law is :p: ) but he's a good read and did come up with some nice stuff.

    If you don't know who made a quote, you can stick Denning's name down there (so long as it's a Denning-esque thing to say) and 50% of the time you'll be right!
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    (Original post by Onearmedbandit)
    If you don't know who made a quote, you can stick Denning's name down there (so long as it's a Denning-esque thing to say) and 50% of the time you'll be right!
    LOL!

    Another good one is Buckmaster who referenced the laws of ancient babylonia
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    Wasn't he a fairly unscrupulous barrister before he became a judge? I was under the impression that he used to search every technicality in precedent in order to enable insurance companies not to pay out claims. What brought the sudden change in his opinion of precedent once he became judge?
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    The insurance companies were no longer paying him?
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    (Original post by TheVlad)
    Wasn't he a fairly unscrupulous barrister before he became a judge? I was under the impression that he used to search every technicality in precedent in order to enable insurance companies not to pay out claims. What brought the sudden change in his opinion of precedent once he became judge?
    I guess that when you are a barrister you are going to do everything in your power to win the case for your clients and so he'd scour precedents to find a way for them to win.

    However, when he was a judge it was no longer about winning or losing and more about doing what he thought was the right thing to do. In doing so he went against precedent which he didn't agree with.

    Just an idea.
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    (Original post by TommehR)

    However, when he was a judge it was no longer about winning or losing and more about doing what he thought was the right thing to do.
    Agreed; not to mention the added element of having the power to go against precedent and, in essence, enforce his own opinion.

    As for the original question, I am ill-informed about specific Denning judgements (other than briefly touching on them) and thus; am unable to vote in the poll.
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    not to mention the added element of having the power to go against precedent and, in essence, enforce his own opinion.

    Denning was only very briefly a member of the House of Lords and returned to the appellate panel of the Court of Appeal as Master of the Rolls.

    He therefore did not have the power to go against precedent, but hell that didn't stop him trying.

    Here are some random Denning quotes just so the voters, who maybe aren't overly familiar with his work, can get a feel for the man.

    "This newcomer has built . . . a house on the edge of the cricket ground which four years ago was a field where cattle grazed. The animals did not mind the cricket."

    ---Miller v. Jackson (1977) Q.B. 966, 976

    "This is a case of a barmaid who was badly bitten by a big dog"

    ---Cummings v. Granger (1977) 1 All E.R. 104, 106

    "None of those cases has any application to a ticket which is issued by an automatic machine. The customer pays his money and gets a ticket. He cannot refuse it. He cannot get his money back. He may protest to the machine, even swear at it; but it will remain unmoved."

    ---Thornton v Shoe Lane Parking Ltd [1971] 1 All ER 686
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    lol Love the first quote in particular!
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    (Original post by Ethereal)
    Today's comedy poll brought to you by Ethereal...

    Denning ... genius of social justice or raving nutter who extended the contract syllabus by 2 thirds?
    Genius and raving nutter! Both! Thing is, these days academics are starting to favour some of his crazy ideas that have been frowned upon! He messed the law up, but it was always for a good cause! Such a great judge- some amazing quotations:

    "In summertime village cricket is the delight of everyone." (Miller v Jackson again) From the very start you know where the judgment is going to go!
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    Denning in H Parsons (livestock) Ltd v. Uttley Ingham:


    "As a rule, mouldy nuts are not bad for pigs"
    He then goes on to observe "E-Coli is very bad for pigs"
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    Hahaha. Denning called my Dad to the Bar so I'll probably have to go for the first one!

    Nope, I do think Denning was cool though, regardless.
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    (Original post by TheVlad)
    Wasn't he a fairly unscrupulous barrister before he became a judge? I was under the impression that he used to search every technicality in precedent in order to enable insurance companies not to pay out claims. What brought the sudden change in his opinion of precedent once he became judge?

    That's not really unscrupulous - if it's the law, it's the law and he's perfectly within his rights as a barrister to find whatever technicality he can in order to win his case. I'm sure there have been several cases when what you or I perceive to be 'traditional justice' HAS been upheld on a technicality.
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    (Original post by kidney thief)
    Denning in H Parsons (livestock) Ltd v. Uttley Ingham:


    "As a rule, mouldy nuts are not bad for pigs"
    He then goes on to observe "E-Coli is very bad for pigs"
    Both of those quotes went into my rather amusing "Pig-Pignuts" essay....
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    Pignuts? Dare I ask??
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    I wouldn't... :rolleyes:

    It was by far the most irritating piece of work I've ever completed. It involved pigs and their digestive systems. Thrilling.
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    I know the case, but why were you writing about "pignuts" and presumably pig **** too?
 
 
 
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