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LSE - Economics with History/Govt/Geography/Philosophy etc watch

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    Seems to be tons of people asking about taking an LSE Joint Hons course of Economics and *pointless Arts subject* and how that'll be viewed for getting into IB. The bottom line is all of those degrees are good enough to get into IB, the M&A side moreso than trading/sales, but a fair bit less than doing pure Economics at LSE, or Economics with a useful subject like Maths. As I think Ben's said a few times, combining it with History, Politics etc dilutes the quantitative aspect of your course, making you less employable for more mathematical trading/structuring. But they're still good courses - I'd recommend them particularly for those not confident about securing LSE pure Economics, which is now a pretty tough course to get an offer for. At the end of the day your peer group at LSE will be the same network of Economists so you'll get all the help and insider knowledge to help you land that IB internship and job. I had quite a few friends doing these courses, LSE Econ/Maths is I would say more in demand than pure Econ to do trading. Econ/Pol and Econ/Hist are good enough to get onto M&A at Goldmans etc. Econ/Geog is a bit more iffy as Geography has no respect, you'll be asked why you picked a "pointless" subject, Philosophy the same to a lesser extent.
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    Cheers, and thanks for the advice.
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    (Original post by cushla)
    First year:
    Environment, Economy and Society
    Either Methods in Spatial and Social Analysis or Contemporary Europe or Elementary Statistical Theory
    Economics B
    Mathematical Methods


    Second year:
    One core course (listed below under 1.)
    Either Microeconomic Principles I or Microeconomic Principles II (more mathematics involved)
    Two Geography/Environment options (listed below under 2.)

    Third year:
    Applied Location and Spatial Analysis
    Macroeconomic Principles
    Two from a prescribed list of options (listed below under 2.)

    1. Second year core courses:
    Environment: Science and Society
    Location and Spatial Analysis
    Political Geographies, Policy and Space
    Economy, Society and Space

    2. Options:

    Research Techniques (Spatial, Social and Environmental)
    Economic Analysis of the Environment
    Environmental Assessment and Management
    Environmental Politics and Policy
    Environmental Risk Management
    The Geography of Gender: Global Perspectives
    Introduction to Development in the South
    Urban Development: Politics, Policy and Planning
    Applied Location and Spatial Analysis
    Geographical Information Systems: Applications in Social Science
    The Political Geography of Development and the South
    Great lineup, though note that many may not look at the individual module breakdown (some forms just ask for overall expected/achieve grade), and just focus on the degree title. If for the latter option "South" is referring to Africa and South America then it'll be a really interesting course, I did a more specific one on Southern Africa which was quite tough is starting afresh with limited knowledge of history bar the basics of apartheid, colonisation etc. For Equity Research, Economics often combined with quantitative subjects is more common and desired, but you could gear it round to your advantage by highlighting quantitative/qualitative skills gained in geographic research (lots of statistical analysis), good macro-level knowledge of politics and the economy etc.
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    (Original post by CitigroupTrader)
    Seems to be tons of people asking about taking an LSE Joint Hons course of Economics and *pointless Arts subject* and how that'll be viewed for getting into IB.
    Hi,

    What do you reckon would be a better choice for IB

    BSc Economics from UCL

    or

    BSC Economics & Economic History from LSE


    Cheers

    John
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    Ucl
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    ucl
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    (Original post by John5000)

    What do you reckon would be a better choice for IB

    BSc Economics from UCL

    or

    BSC Economics & Economic History from LSE


    Interesting, so just having the LSE name is probably not better despite it being a decent course.
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    (Original post by CitigroupTrader)
    securing LSE pure Economics, which is now a pretty tough course to get an offer for.

    Out of curiosity, how difficult was it to get into this course before (and when approximately)?
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    (Original post by John5000)
    Interesting, so just having the LSE name is probably not better despite it being a decent course.
    Take what ElWilson and Honza said with a pinch of salt. If you do have an interest in economic history, go for it. It's under the Economics department and the degree can get almost as quantitative as the pure Economics degree if you want it to. At the end of the day, you can still get a front office job with it.

    With that said, if you want to get into the absolutely most mathematical division of IB, then you should go with UCL's L100. But don't scratch LSE off just yet.
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    (Original post by Knogle)
    Take what ElWilson and Honza said with a pinch of salt. If you do have an interest in economic history, go for it. It's under the Economics department and the degree can get almost as quantitative as the pure Economics degree if you want it to. At the end of the day, you can still get a front office job with it.

    With that said, if you want to get into the absolutely most mathematical division of IB, then you should go with UCL's L100. But don't scratch LSE off just yet.
    LSE all the way. The Econ+EconHist degree is one the best regarded. You can get into a top IB with this degree. You will do degree level maths and history - it is by no means easy as very few have the skill to do both.

    About 15 people graduate on this programme (on average) per year and they do very well.

    I know 5 people (3rd years) who are doing straight EconHistory and have secured jobs at top banks, ie GS,MS,ML.... When you consider about 30 people graduate from this course per year ( not all will have 2.1's, and quite a few will not want to go into IB,etc), that is quite impressive. And their not just in corpfinance, but also sales/trading.

    Citigrouptrader is what i consider to be the typical BSc Econ student from LSE, i.e Econ is the best!! It should help, but the men will be separated from the boys when you get to the assessment centres. UCL is good, but LSE will give you the edge.
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    Is A-Level Maths a requirement for the LSE Eco History and Eco?
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    (Original post by ElWilson)
    Is A-Level Maths a requirement for the LSE Eco History and Eco?
    Course requirement: A level Mathematics is required. A level Economics is not essential. No other specific subjects are required at A level, but we would prefer traditional academic subjects to subjects such as Communication Studies, Accounting, Business Studies or Media Studies.
    http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/under...omics/L1V3.htm
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    Thats sucks.
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    (Original post by ElWilson)
    Is A-Level Maths a requirement for the LSE Eco History and Eco?
    The joint course is just AAB though.

    http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/under...story/VL31.htm

    Ive accepted UCL L100 as my firm and this course at LSE as my insurance. I dont know if i will regret it though.
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    (Original post by slick_rick)
    LSE all the way. The Econ+EconHist degree is one the best regarded. You can get into a top IB with this degree. You will do degree level maths and history - it is by no means easy as very few have the skill to do both.

    About 15 people graduate on this programme (on average) per year and they do very well.

    I know 5 people (3rd years) who are doing straight EconHistory and have secured jobs at top banks, ie GS,MS,ML.... When you consider about 30 people graduate from this course per year ( not all will have 2.1's, and quite a few will not want to go into IB,etc), that is quite impressive. And their not just in corpfinance, but also sales/trading.

    Citigrouptrader is what i consider to be the typical BSc Econ student from LSE, i.e Econ is the best!! It should help, but the men will be separated from the boys when you get to the assessment centres. UCL is good, but LSE will give you the edge.
    I second this
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    (Original post by bryan)
    I second this
    I agree as well.

    Go to LSE.
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    sorry to ask how an earth do you add links.
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    by typing them? http://www.whitehouse.com
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    (Original post by arsenalfan)
    sorry to ask how an earth do you add links.
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/misc.php?do=bbcode#url
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    (Original post by John5000)
    What do you reckon would be a better choice for IB

    BSc Economics from UCL

    or

    BSC Economics & Economic History from LSE
    Either will do. Both will work you hard and train you well. Both universities give you plenty of opportunities to stand out. If you're good enough, you'll get spotted.

    Anyway...

    i am definitely joining the finance and investment societies at LSE
    This made me laugh. A lot. Sorry. Because you and 1499 or so other people will be in it. What a competitive edge!
 
 
 
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