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    What can I do with an LLB Law Degree in the Armed Forces?

    Straight after graduating with a Law Degree, what options does this give me in the armed forces, if any?
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    I don't know about the UK, but here in Singapore, they don't really care what you got your degree in. All that matters is your degree classification.
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    Fair enough, it is the same for alot of jobs here in the UK also.

    Singapore. I have a friend from there. He's a bloody genious. A wana-be Astro-Physicist.
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    For branches such as Pilot, WSO, Supple, Admin, Regt, ATC, FC the subject of your degree does not matter. For some branches, eg Engineer, PEdO, then the subject has to be relevant. Thus a law degree would still give you a wide range of branches to apply to. For the legal branch specifically, you would have to ask an AFCO, I think you have to be qualified as a solicitor, but I am not 100% on that. However, the Legal Branch is one of the few branches that is recruiting like mad at the moment as law comes to the forefront of ops nowdays.
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    Yea like the other 'professional' branches you need to have a certain ammount of experience as a practicing solicitor. However as Threeport said, the general branches don't specifiy a type of degree (or even a degree at all) and I assume it's a similar situation wiith the lesser services. Contact your AFCO (look in the FAQ thread) to find out.
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    (Original post by GR4pilot)
    I assume it's a similar situation wiith the lesser services.
    Get bent junior
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    (Original post by Steve Stifler)
    Get bent junior
    lol
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    To add: If you've got an LLB, wouldn't you be interested in pursuing law? I only ask as my mate is in his last year of an LLB and has absolutely no interest in taking a career in it, is this common?
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    I am not even remotely intrested in entering a legal career. I intend to use my degree to it's best effect within the armed forces/police if possible, that's what I'm looking into at the moment.
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    Law won't help you any more than any other degree. In fact, if you aren't truly interested in law, then it could be a foolish path to take, in that it is both a very competitive course to get onto, and thereafter a very tough course to complete.

    If you are just doing it as a means to an end, as the subject will give you no advantage in the RAF, it doesn't make sense to go for law.

    To give you an edge in RAF selection your degree would either have to be vocational ie Sports Science for a PEdO application, PGCE for Admin (Trg), or an engineering/aeronautics degree for Pilot/WSO. However, the edge for the non-vocational branches is very slight, and easily countered by strong aptitude scores or excellent extra-curriculars.
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    Maybe you can join the Army Legal Service.
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    Why, if he has no interest in law? :confused:
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    I was talking to a chap at Blandford who had a law degree and was doing his Signals troopie course.
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    Yup, what I meant is why do people chose a degree which they have no interest in pursuing whatsoever?
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    a) Because they wish to pursue a career path that either requires a degree, or for which a degree would be advantageous, but the subject is not important.

    b) Because they are foolish.


    c) ?
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    Only advantage I can see is, my ex-girlfriends dad used to be a RW pilot, left after having her, and started up his own business - in which he had to understand the law surrounding employing people. But really, it's a (in my opinion) boring degree, clearly difficult.. so why do it if you don't want a career in it? Seems pointless to me.
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)


    c) ?
    For the "wow" factor that someone has gotten a degree in Law (or any other hard and *respected* course). Usually people that don't think, and take it at face value.
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    For the "wow" factor? Really? Is that so? I think you underestimate law graduates. Law graduates have one of thee highest employment rates around. 40% of graduates do not even continue into a legal career, instead they proceed into finance, the civil service, police etc..
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    Law won't help you any more than any other degree. In fact, if you aren't truly interested in law, then it could be a foolish path to take, in that it is both a very competitive course to get onto, and thereafter a very tough course to complete.

    If you are just doing it as a means to an end, as the subject will give you no advantage in the RAF, it doesn't make sense to go for law.

    To give you an edge in RAF selection your degree would either have to be vocational ie Sports Science for a PEdO application, PGCE for Admin (Trg), or an engineering/aeronautics degree for Pilot/WSO. However, the edge for the non-vocational branches is very slight, and easily countered by strong aptitude scores or excellent extra-curriculars.
    I never said I intended to enter the armed forces, I said, what could I do with a Law Degree in the armed forces. A degree in law gives me the widest spectrum of career options and therefore would be the least foolish degree.

    Sports science? What happens if you dont want to go into the armed forces after your degree? I'll tell you what, you're screwed. 80% of sports graduates nowdays are UNEMPLOYED/are in a job that didnt require a degree, within their first six months. Go figure.

    I won't disagree with you on the engineering side of things, however you have to have a real passion for engineering, becauase you will be BORED OUT OF YOUR SKULL if you don't. And secondly, an engineering course is just as tough as a Law Course.
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    (Original post by djmarkmclachlan)
    Only advantage I can see is, my ex-girlfriends dad used to be a RW pilot, left after having her, and started up his own business - in which he had to understand the law surrounding employing people. But really, it's a (in my opinion) boring degree, clearly difficult.. so why do it if you don't want a career in it? Seems pointless to me.
    Yes, in YOUR opinion its a boring degree, I beg to differ. And so do many, many others. Tell me something, if you intend to go to university, what do you want to study? Or what are you studying, or what have you studied?
 
 
 
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