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    Read this in the Times today, does anyone have any info?

    Opinions? Surely, as lawyers are simply the representatives of their clients, criminal convictions that they themselves hold are irrelevant? If a firm thinks it doesn't want to take a lawyer with a theft conviction, surely that is up to said firm, not the law society?
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    Theft is a dishonesty offence, therefore, someone who has been convicted of theft is not of the good character required to be a Solicitor
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    As a solicitor you are an Officer of the Court. It is essential that the profession ensures that all its members have the very highest standards of personal integrity in order that the public can have confidence in those who are involved in the administration of the law and justice. With some exceptions, the fact that you have a conviction for a criminal offence is prima facie evidence that you do not have those requisite standards.
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    Surely that isn't fair of people who may have done silly things when they were younger, and have changed? I reckon it adds, or would add, to the huge gap between the elitists at the bar, and the poorer people from council estates who may have had brushes with the law.
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    (Original post by cottonmouth)
    Surely that isn't fair of people who may have done silly things when they were younger, and have changed? I reckon it adds, or would add, to the huge gap between the elitists at the bar, and the poorer people from council estates who may have had brushes with the law.

    What utter tripe. Are you suggesting that living on a council estate makes people more likely to do stupid things when younger?
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    If your offence is minor then it may well have been struck from the record after a period of time and it is no longer necessary to declare it (I can't recall the legislation this falls under now).

    If the offence is serious, however, then it is absolutely no excuse to say "Well, i came from a poor background so please ignore my conviction for theft/joy-riding/burglary" etc etc.

    Frankly, I get tired of the whole chip-on-the-shoulder "law is such an elitist profession" whinge. If you're good, you'll make it. If you're not, do something else and stop thinking that you're somehow "owed" a career at a top firm. When I say "you" I don't necessarily mean you, Cottonmouth. I mean those idiots that think that a profession which is governed by the economics of supply and demand should adopt some form of positive discrimination and be required to start recruiting people from schools and unis that might not be up to scratch.
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    (Original post by chalks)
    If your offence is minor then it may well have been struck from the record after a period of time and it is no longer necessary to declare it (I can't recall the legislation this falls under now).
    Rehabilitation of Offenders Act. But those within the legal profession fall within an exception and always have to declare their convictions. In any event, even without CRB checks now, you are obliged to state any convictions (except minor motoring offences) before you can be admitted to either branch of the profession. The CRB check will simply ensure you are not lying on your declaration; it is not a fundamental overhaul of the system.
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    The Law Society position ...

    http://www.lawsociety.org.uk/newsand...?NEWSID=277275
 
 
 
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