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    ...when you delete them?

    They are not physically ejected from your computer, so they must still be there in some form...!?
    I've heard of computer specialists being able to recover files thought lost from computers and comps tend to slow as they age. Both would be explained by files ACTUALLY NOT being deleted completely...
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    isnt that how the caught garry glitter?? (and countless other paedos)
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    Files are not deleted, but the space they are using is simply earmarked as available to save any new files onto. So, until that space is reused, the files still exist.
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    :ditto:
    the only thing that is deleted is the path to that file.

    When you format your hard drive (not quick format), then you actually remove files in your hard drive.

    say if you delete file1.jpg, then only the path to the file is deleted and the actual file is still on the hard drive.
    However if you save file2.jpg on your computer, and file2.jpg happens to be saved where the file1.jpg is, then you cant retreive file1.jpg

    This is the way programs that delete files securely work. They replace the file1.jpg with some junk data.
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    well when you delete a file you actually deleting the REFERENCE for that file. you fill will essentially still be recoverable unless it is overwritten with new data. Yes it is possible to recover some deleted files try download.com and you'll be able to download some of the programs. The only real sure way of removing them is to use another program to erase the files completely. but even then some really good computer specialists may still be able to recover them. The final alternative is to physically destroy your hard drive! that way the files will no longer be recoverable !
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    When they are saved over, what happens?
    Is even the most basic imprint of their former existence still there, or are they truly no more?

    Edit: I am just curious: I dont have a problem that needs solving!
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    try www.howstuffworks.com
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    (Original post by Phonicsdude)
    When they are saved over, what happens?
    Is even the most basic imprint of their former existence still there, or are they truly no more?

    Edit: I am just curious: I dont have a problem that needs solving!
    Some software you can buy, often called digital shredders are supposed to completley erase the files. The one I have has options to increase the number of wipes the software makes when deleting the file. So i would infer from that, it is possible and the higher number of wipes you make, the harder it is.

    If you have norton systemworks, simply go to "wipe info" under utilities.
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    DPM. Give me more neg rep baby. It's worth so much I feel my internet sex hormones going crazy. :rolleyes:
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    It is possible to recover data even after it has been overwritten several times. The more passes you make overwriting some data, the harder it is to recover. A gutman wipe makes 30 passes I think which is considered fairly good, but still could be recovered.
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    (Original post by Baron)
    It is possible to recover data even after it has been overwritten several times. The more passes you make overwriting some data, the harder it is to recover. A gutman wipe makes 30 passes I think which is considered fairly good, but still could be recovered.
    Surely once the binary data is over written there is no way of recovering the original data though?

    I know even a normal format does not completly destroy data thoughl
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    Damn, there I was thinking I could download bomb making instructions then write over it with 160GB of TIFF files.
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    (Original post by Stick Man)
    Damn, there I was thinking I could download bomb making instructions then write over it with 160GB of TIFF files.
    you could do it then destroy the HD
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    (Original post by AT82)
    Surely once the binary data is over written there is no way of recovering the original data though?

    I know even a normal format does not completly destroy data thoughl
    It is to do with how the data is stored on harddrives (To be honest I have n idea about the ins and outs of this, but you can google to find out more if you are interested) which means you can reverse engineer the overwriting of data.

    This thread has some quite interesting things in it: http://cert.uni-stuttgart.de/archive...ads.html#00353
    Gutmann explains that when a 1 bit is written over a zero bit, the "actual effect is closer to obtaining a .95 when a zero is overwritten with a one, and a 1.05 when a one is overwritten with a one". Given that, given a read head 20 times as sensitive as the one in the drive, and given the pattern of overwrite bits one could recover the under-data.
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    The only way to get rid of the data is to use either a very large electromagnet or to take the drive out and smash it apart with a hammer. Data can be recovered from drives even after running software data removal tools. This is done by taking the platters out of a disk and putting it into a special head which is able to be steered on the tracks so that it can find data right at the very edge of the track where it may not be over written.
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    (Original post by markkey)
    This is done by taking the platters out of a disk and putting it into a special head which is able to be steered on the tracks so that it can find data right at the very edge of the track where it may not be over written.
    Like rubbing out most of a sentence with an eraser, but leaving the tops of the letters. You can still work out what the sentence says.
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    When I was a kid we used to think it was over the top that organisations removed the hard drives, it annoyed us because me and my mate had a school business of taking base units out of skips and selling them in Loot, nearly ever time we had to fit a hard drive to them because they beed removed.

    I remember when I was 13/14 I would come home after visiting my mates on a saturday afternoon with £100 cash and my parents didn';t believe it came from a loot. In the old days there was a lot of money in PCs
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    Data can also be recovered by painstaking forensic examination of the individual ones and zeroes on the magnetic platters. So watch out paedos.
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    (Original post by dazmanultra)
    Data can also be recovered by painstaking forensic examination of the individual ones and zeroes on the magnetic platters. So watch out paedos.
    Yeah, they can use an electron microscope to recover data.
 
 
 
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