Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I swear sometimes for no reasons, but not that often. But im wondering why people swear for - just to emphasize something or...:confused:
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I NEVER swear! It means that if I do swear, it really packs a punch! And yes - I guess it is just to emphasize, or to shock!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    It's a way of expressing one's emotions in a more satisfactory manner than standard English will allow.
    Offline

    13
    Lack of a wider vocabularly that can express the same sentiments in a more eloquent manner?

    What does Profesh think?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Well I still know clever ppl that still swear alot.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yawn)
    Lack of a wider vocabularly that can express the same sentiments in a more eloquent manner?

    What does Profesh think?
    lmfao.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    i swear alot but ive been told that people often swear because they lack the vocabulary to express their feelings in another way lol..but i'm trying to cut down.....or stop completely because i know it doesnt sound very nice
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by iceman_jondoe)
    i swear alot but ive been told that people often swear because they lack the vocabulary to express their feelings in another way lol..but i'm trying to cut down.....or stop completely because i know it doesnt sound very nice
    "Oh sugar"

    "Oh ****"

    The latter makes me feel better.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    people swear because it shows how angry or in pain they are. it might suggests that they have a poor vocab or whatever but can you really see someone falling from an aeroplane crash or getting their finger stuck in a door or finding out their wife/husband cheated and they just say "oh dear"? it just doesn't happen!
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    ^^ unless your ned flanders
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yawn)
    Lack of a wider vocabularly that can express the same sentiments in a more eloquent manner?
    Expressing one's sentiments in a more eloquent manner lacks that certain je ne sais quoi. Sithius has got the right idea.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yawn)
    Lack of a wider vocabularly that can express the same sentiments in a more eloquent manner?

    What does Profesh think?
    B*llocks.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Profesh)
    B*llocks.
    lmao
    Offline

    11
    The middle classes will claim that swearing is merely indicative of a lack of education, a dearth of coherent argument, or just the inability to construct any form of response. To them, swearing is often a mortal sin, loathed to the point that they could not possibly associate with anyone who commits it.

    So I swear, just to piss off the middle classes.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I think 2+2=5 might have caught onto the end of another reason people swear - to identify with a social group. Sometimes, especially when meeting a new person of their same age, someone might use swearing in order to see what reaction it gets. If it's reciprocated (or even taken to a stronger 'level') then subconsciously they can recognise them as fitting in with their group. If it's not, or if it's met with disapproval, then that also gives an idea of where the newcomer stands socially.

    I remember reading (in the Telegraph, of all places!) recently that how you speak is really more of a sign of your social 'class' than how much you earn nowadays. I suppose it is true that your accent and choice of language mark your origins very significantly - people can still tell I'm from "the North" despite having lived in Oxfordshire for the past 13 years.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 2 + 2 = 5)
    The middle classes will claim that swearing is merely indicative of a lack of education, a dearth of coherent argument, or just the inability to construct any form of response. To them, swearing is often a mortal sin, loathed to the point that they could not possibly associate with anyone who commits it.

    So I swear, just to piss off the middle classes.
    Are you poor? (no offence intended).

    I'm middle class and I swear, as does my mum sometimes. (Don't wanna hear my sister when she is pissed off. Wait no... scratch that. When she is chatting. )
    Offline

    11
    (Original post by Sithius)
    Are you poor? (no offence intended).

    I'm middle class and I swear, as does my mum sometimes. (Don't wanna hear my sister when she is pissed off. Wait no... scratch that. When she is chatting. )
    I am either poor, or self-isolating, or significantly richer than thou. Either way, it is increasingly evident over recent decades that the deliberate offence of those with social sensibities has become a legitimate and competitve sport. And I'm not the kind of person to lose a game without at least my best efforts against it.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Using a swear word is like a punch in the face, but obviously the effectiveness depends on how often you swear during normal conversation anyway.

    I swear too often but am trying to come up with cuddlier alternatives; like poop instead of sh*t. Any better ideas?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gio)
    I swear sometimes for no reasons, but not that often. But im wondering why people swear for - just to emphasize something or...:confused:
    What; at you in particular?

    Having read that post, I should think the rationale to be self-evident.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by philjw)
    Sometimes, especially when meeting a new person of their same age, someone might use swearing in order to see what reaction it gets. If it's reciprocated (or even taken to a stronger 'level') then subconsciously they can recognise them as fitting in with their group. If it's not, or if it's met with disapproval, then that also gives an idea of where the newcomer stands socially.
    Yes, most people get over that phase by the time they're 13.

    (Original post by philjw)
    I remember reading (in the Telegraph, of all places!) recently that how you speak is really more of a sign of your social 'class' than how much you earn nowadays. I suppose it is true that your accent and choice of language mark your origins very significantly - people can still tell I'm from "the North" despite having lived in Oxfordshire for the past 13 years.
    I don't think anyone needs to hear you speak to be able to tell you're from the North
 
 
 
Poll
“Yanny” or “Laurel”
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.