Nikita_st
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Hello, i have searched the existing threads but none of the previous posts on this subject seem to relate to me.

I have just been turned down at my RAF Medical on the grounds that i had a very mild bout of depression that happend 9 years ago.

I was honest in my medical and my own GP who sent a report to the examiner did get some facts wrong (of which i viewed and corrected via numerous letters prior to submission).

I've been trying seriously to join the RAF for about 18months now but along the path things kept preventing me from progressing now only to be told there is a very high posibility that i will never be able to join :'(

I appreciate that due to cutbacks they can be picky about who they accept but i intend to appeal against the decision as this is what i want for my life, everyone who knows me knows what this means to me and how hard ive worked to get to this point.

The examining GP said he would have had no problem passing me as in his personal and professional view everything checks out and he could see that i was a strong willed person, but due to protocol he had to say no.

My question is, who knows what the process of appeal is, what are my chances of a successful appeal and does anyone have any tips on how to succeed? I need as much help as i can get and i really hope i can get my chance to stand before a board at Cranwell and plead my case.

Thanks
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ProStacker
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What is it that you think negates your medical history? Is it wrong?

If it isn't wrong, and you do not meet the criteria set, then what is the basis for your appeal? Having 'people' say that 'you are strong willed' is not going to pass the pretty well-founded criteria set by the Forces.
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FreddieK
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'Who knows what the process of appeal is?' - the staff at your RAF Careers Office know, you should always speak to them if you have any queries about your application.

Once they have received the result of your medical they will send you a letter explaining the appeals process - but an appeal isn't a given, you have to be able to provide new evidence about your condition. You don't get to 'plead your case'; most of the process is done through paperwork, though you may have to go for further assessemnts if they decide an appeal is valid, and it can take months.

No-one on here will be able to say whether you will be successful or not, they don't know your medical history; leave that to the experts.
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Nikita_st
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(Original post by ProStacker)
What is it that you think negates your medical history? Is it wrong?

If it isn't wrong, and you do not meet the criteria set, then what is the basis for your appeal? Having 'people' say that 'you are strong willed' is not going to pass the pretty well-founded criteria set by the Forces.
There were some details in the original report to be sent that were nothing to do with my medical history but were actually in reference to my then partner which had been discussed with my GP. For some reason they added it to my notes which now read like they were relevant to me. I would imagine that this is one basis for appeal. I understand what you're saying about the Forces criteria, theyre there for a reason but when other people with worse conditions manage to get in i suppose one cant help but feel hard done by...


(Original post by FreddieK)
'Who knows what the process of appeal is?' - the staff at your RAF Careers Office know, you should always speak to them if you have any queries about your application.

Once they have received the result of your medical they will send you a letter explaining the appeals process - but an appeal isn't a given, you have to be able to provide new evidence about your condition. You don't get to 'plead your case'; most of the process is done through paperwork, though you may have to go for further assessemnts if they decide an appeal is valid, and it can take months.

No-one on here will be able to say whether you will be successful or not, they don't know your medical history; leave that to the experts.
I have been in touch with my local AFCO but they havent been forthcoming with much useful info. Theyve basically just said wait for my letter via email. This is yet to arrive because of "system failures" which is affecting their email service. I appreciate you saying no one will be able to say if i will be successful or not, i was just asking what peoples experiences were and if anyone had any tips for success. I want to get this right as i know i only get one shot at it! I am more than willing to attend an appointment with an occupational assessor as i know i am fit and healthy and more than ready for service, ive wanted it for a long time
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James82
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At the end of the day, if you had the choice of putting a man into a theatre of war where they are responsible for making life and death decisions, would you put in the man with a history of mental illness or the one without a history of mental illness?
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Drewski
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(Original post by Nikita_st)
I want to get this right as i know i only get one shot at it! I am more than willing to attend an appointment with an occupational assessor as i know i am fit and healthy and more than ready for service, ive wanted it for a long time
With all due respect; no you don't.

You believe you are. You think you are. Wanting it for a long time conveys no certainty whatsoever. All the Armed Forces use their own criteria for what they believe makes someone 'fit and healthy' for the role, according to a strict interpretation of those rules, you are not.

Regarding the wider news, I have to be honest and say I haven't heard of anyone undergoing a successful appeal: the Forces don't like people who 'rock the boat' so to speak.
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Nikita_st
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Guys, i appreciate what you're saying but negativity isnt exactly helping me here. I only asked for some tips or advice from anyone who may know the process, not a lecture. Not only that, might i add that in an example one of you gave "would you put in the man with a history of mental illness or the one without a history of mental illness?" i know for a fact the RAF have already done this. A guy i went to college with and was good friends with is currently serving having suffered the so called same ailment as myself except for the fact that he was on medication whereas i wasnt cause i never took mine (the evidence is in my loft as thats where i put it to hide it). He managed to join only a short time after the event. Ive shown no signs of relapse, gone through much worse situations and managed exceptionally well.

To use your phrase, with all due respect, my "history of mental illness" is questionable. Looking back i believe it was misdiagnosis and purely a low point in my life exasperated by numerous circumstances. I just didnt know how to deal with it as i was young so foolishly went to the doctors. I think that was a big mistake but thats hindsight for you and now my medical records have been tarnished forever
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RAF-Recruiter
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You HAVE been on medication. The fact that you decided not to take it is absolutely irrelevant, It's the fact that a doctor deemed it necessary to prescribe it that is the issue.

If you believe you have been misdiagnosed, then it's a matter you need to address with the surgery. The afco can only act upon the information it receives from your doctor, it is up to you to ensure your medical records are correct. As long as your records remain as they are, the descision will remain.


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Nikita_st
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Well thats your view and i appreciate that but the fact that it should state on my records that i never took them as i told my doctor at the time means that i HAVEN'T been on medication, i suppose it doesn't make any difference that the dosage was the lowest possible either but thank you for your input. I think i'm going to have to fight for amendments to my records then if ive any chance of progress :/
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RAF-Recruiter
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It's not my opinion, and it's not my view, It's the way the RAF implement their policy.

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Drewski
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(Original post by Nikita_st)
Well thats your view and i appreciate that but the fact that it should state on my records that i never took them as i told my doctor at the time means that i HAVEN'T been on medication, i suppose it doesn't make any difference that the dosage was the lowest possible either but thank you for your input. I think i'm going to have to fight for amendments to my records then if ive any chance of progress :/
Whether you took them or not you were prescribed them which means a doctor thought you needed them in the first place.



In your opening post you asked "what are my chances of a successful appeal and does anyone have any tips on how to succeed?". The people here are answering you.

It's just not the answer you wanted to hear.
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importunate
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(Original post by RAF-Recruiter)
You HAVE been on medication. The fact that you decided not to take it is absolutely irrelevant, It's the fact that a doctor deemed it necessary to prescribe it that is the issue.

If you believe you have been misdiagnosed, then it's a matter you need to address with the surgery. The afco can only act upon the information it receives from your doctor, it is up to you to ensure your medical records are correct. As long as your records remain as they are, the descision will remain.


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Not sure if you are a real recruiter. 1) You wouldn't know why he had failed his medical, you arn't privy to an RG8 unless you are doing something wrong.

2) Your advice is wrong. To appeal you have a process which I don't know about... But you would do to a specialist/consultant and get a report. And if you were a recruiter you would know this... Its not your place to say if decisions will remain, unless you are a med officer as well as a recruiter.

If you are not a Walting muppet why not give the bloke the propper advice?

This will probs be being deleted. And I don't even care. I shan't be coming on this site anymore. All of the so called experts with regards to armed foces make blaring discrepencies all the time. It makes a mockery of the armed foces. If you dont know what you are talking about, say so and move on.
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Nikita_st
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(Original post by Drewski)
In your opening post you asked "what are my chances of a successful appeal and does anyone have any tips on how to succeed?". The people here are answering you.

It's just not the answer you wanted to hear.
Thats not the case at all, i knew not all answers would be positive but lets face it, i havent exactly had my questions answered properly either have i... It seems that the people who have replied are ones with just a view on my situation rather than an answer based on their own experience of the appeal process which is what i asked about

Thank you all anyway, i have taken on board all of your input.
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ProStacker
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(Original post by importunate)
Not sure if you are a real recruiter. 1) You wouldn't know why he had failed his medical, you arn't privy to an RG8 unless you are doing something wrong.

2) Your advice is wrong. To appeal you have a process which I don't know about... But you would do to a specialist/consultant and get a report. And if you were a recruiter you would know this... Its not your place to say if decisions will remain, unless you are a med officer as well as a recruiter.

If you are not a Walting muppet why not give the bloke the propper advice?

This will probs be being deleted. And I don't even care. I shan't be coming on this site anymore. All of the so called experts with regards to armed foces make blaring discrepencies all the time. It makes a mockery of the armed foces. If you dont know what you are talking about, say so and move on.
You need to calm down. You've completely not understood what was written and started windmilling.
Firstly - the advice is correct. The medical history is what the DOCTOR says - they are the medical specialist. If the doctor says they prescribed someone medication, then that person was 'on medication'. If that person chose not to take it, they were going against the advice of a medical professional, but as far as the system goes, they were on it.

Secondly - if they believe their medical records are incorrect, they need to address this with their own doctor - the person who wrote those records. You don't see a specialist for that. You see a specialist if you might have a change of wellbeing or fitness - not that you disagree with the paperwork of the time. There was also no mention of knowing why they failed their medical - it wasn't needed. The advice given has nothing to do with passing or failing the medical, but that they need to speak to their own doctor.

If you are going to get all stroppy and start calling serving members walts, best you keep to your other threads - I know you aren't staying away from this site as you promised.
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TAALCB
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Hello, I too have been knocked back from applying due to 'bunions' from 20 years of ballet dancing. I was wondering whether it would be useful to appeal against this? They have never caused me any bother before, I have never been to the doctor about them causing me pain or irritation. I understand the RAF have a strict policy on feet and bunions come under them but I really do not see how they will affect my training. Any help guys?
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jannisjr
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(Original post by TAALCB)
Hello, I too have been knocked back from applying due to 'bunions' from 20 years of ballet dancing. I was wondering whether it would be useful to appeal against this? They have never caused me any bother before, I have never been to the doctor about them causing me pain or irritation. I understand the RAF have a strict policy on feet and bunions come under them but I really do not see how they will affect my training. Any help guys?
I had the exact same issue. I have had the bunion surgically corrected, and next year I go back to try again, although i'm still not 100% what their policy is on that, because nobody seemed to be particularly forthcoming with that information.

The GP who conducted the medical said that i'd need to be a year clear of surgery, and that I would have to be cleared back to health by the surgeon. They did stipulate though that they have case by case rules on having metal pins in feet, although my surgeon assures me that the pins are lifelong and shouldn't cause any issues whatsoever. I mean, Paula Radcliffe had bunion surgery, and ran marathons less than a year later. I hope this will be the final test in my Capita medical pains.

The jury's out, but i'm gonna try again anyhow. It's still the dream. I'll update you on how it goes when I reapply.
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Gutted95
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What was the outcome of application with regards to bunions. Just been declared PMU because of valgus distal phalanx - didn't even know I had a problem with my feet!
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jannisjr
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I'm still in the interview/aptitude part - once I get to the medical i'll update this thread!
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MollyR93
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Hi guys,
I have just appealed after having been declared PMU, have any of you had success in your appeals recently? Could you tell me approximately how long it took to hear back from the date you sent the letter?
Thanks M x
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AD2468
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(Original post by MollyR93)
Hi guys,
I have just appealed after having been declared PMU, have any of you had success in your appeals recently? Could you tell me approximately how long it took to hear back from the date you sent the letter?
Thanks M x
It took a month to hear back after I sent off the letter saying I intended to appeal, and gave the reasons for this. They replied saying they were happy to look into it and I had to send some forms off saying they could contact my GP. When I sent these back I also included a letter from a specialist who backed my case up.

That was about 3 weeks ago and I haven't heard back yet but I'm hoping to in the next couple of weeks....
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