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    Has anyone here learned to built a PC? Where did you learn it from?
    Also how time consuming is it to built a PC?
    Thanks for you help.
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    It is pretty simple once you grasp the basics. To be honest I had more trouble connecting all the molex cables up!

    I have a link somewhere, I'll try to find it.

    Edit:

    Just checked favourites, not there for some reason. Sorry! I'm sure someone else will have a link.
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    I just thought of it as a jigsaw, albeit a kickassly powerful one
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    (Original post by bassamband)
    Has anyone here learned to built a PC? Where did you learn it from?
    Also how time consuming is it to built a PC?
    Thanks for you help.
    I just read the motherboard instructions.
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    (Original post by Moncal)
    I just read the motherboard instructions.
    lmao, smart ass. :p:
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    I have found some pretty useful links from google but unsure about how time consuming it is?
    Also how much cheaper is it build a pc than to buy a pc?
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    http://www.cheap-computers-guide.com...-computer.html - hope that helps
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    I learnt from getting old PCs and ripping them apart, upgrading them with other old parts etc...as long as you do your research and make sure everything is compatible and take your time when building it really is very simple.

    The motherboard manual is your best friend though, most seem to guide you through the build process including installing CPU, RAM, Graphics etc.

    Cost is something that varies from PC to PC; low end office pcs can sometimes be cheaper to buy from places like Dell (sad but true), however most of the time you can make quite a nice saving, especially on high end gaming PCs. You also get exactly what you need, not what the system builder can make the most profit on.

    For a newbie I'd put aside a whole day for the build, but for the more experienced builder getting a PC together with Windows etc. installed can easily be done in <2hrs.
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    I don't know how i learnt...i just..did it. Most mobos come with instructions/manual as mentioned before, so you can't really go wrong! Get someone perhaps to show you one time, it's not hard at all.

    regards
    --marty
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    NOTE TO ALL.

    If Replacing a motherboard - please make sure you remove all of those extra screw in supports which you find in the case.
    if you leave one in there and it is not used (if it does not line up with a hole on the motherboard) it is likely to short itself and give you grief.

    I tell you this as I nearly threw my computer out the window
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    I taught myself when I was 14, I bought an old 386 and rebuilt it.

    I have a good electrical knowledge which helps a lot.
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    When I was about 13, I bought my own computer off a guy who made custom PCs and the good deal (at the time) made me want to learn how to build myself. Which happened over time, through reading PC mags and websites.
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    :ditto:
    But I wasnt sure which parts to buy as some processors arent compatible with motherboards and stuff, so my uncle came with me. Been making my computers every since.

    If Replacing a motherboard - please make sure you remove all of those extra screw in supports which you find in the case.
    if you leave one in there and it is not used (if it does not line up with a hole on the motherboard) it is likely to short itself and give you grief.
    I've had that experience. Also not tightening the screws enough (but not too tight!) has the same effect.

    Another thing I might mention is static! I had to throw away my motherboard once because of this.
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    I have neva touched a manual. Plus its really thick, has a small font, and doesnt have many fun pictures, so i cant open it.

    I just generally picked up on stuff from the net, as the situtation required me to do so.
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    A clan I was in a couple of years ago, were very technical, and into the whole overclocking scene... They were always talking about new projects they were working on, and the specs of the pc's they were building for that particular project. I took a keen interest and learnt from pros. Best way really. It's not really complicated though, just making sure you get the components which suit your needs best; putting them together and setting them up is fairly self-explanatory.
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    Off the internet websites such as this forum, magazines, PC tech guy from PC service call when fixing old PC, friends, manuals and guides!
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    The only difficult/scary bits are fitting the heatsink, I always feel I'm gonna damage the CPU when I install it. But once you get the clip on, its always turned out fine. The cables for the power LEDs and switch can be fiddly and difficult to get your head around for newbies. Just follow the instructions in the MOBO manual. Oh, and watch out for sharp edges on the case. I've cut my fingers loadsa times.
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    (Original post by JayEm)
    Oh, and watch out for sharp edges on the case. I've cut my fingers loadsa times.
    Buy cases that have the edges filed down then.
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    Since i was about 11 i have built all the computers we have had, works out miles cheaper and you know exactly what is in there Without all the stupid branding everywhere as well.

    Its not really that hard, takes less than an hour anyway Just make sure you research your hardware first, don't wanna have a S939 mobo and a S775 processor, or a PCI-e mobo and AGP card, you get the idea Also, i always use one of them geeky looking shock wristband things after getting static from myself on the memory and it being killed
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    (Original post by JayEm)
    The only difficult/scary bits are fitting the heatsink, I always feel I'm gonna damage the CPU when I install it. But once you get the clip on, its always turned out fine. The cables for the power LEDs and switch can be fiddly and difficult to get your head around for newbies. Just follow the instructions in the MOBO manual. Oh, and watch out for sharp edges on the case. I've cut my fingers loadsa times.
    Or perhaps more importantly, watch out for static shocks which could lead to components frying and in extreme cases your death (sorry if that scares you)! Do not handle the motherboard directly on a carpet, for instance. I tend to lay the motherboard on the polythene bag it comes in.

    ETA: Sorry, didn't see the post above mentioned static... :/
 
 
 
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