Chloride transportation in CF Watch

Laura Lou
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#1
Can someone explain to me how chloride is transported through cells in people with cystic fibrosis?

From my understanding, the channel that transports chloride is blocked or doesn't function properly - therefore there is a net movement of water into cells - causing problems in the lungs, pancreas and sweat glands. But if chloride can't be transported, how is it absorbed and manage to reach these organs in the first place?
0
reply
sea tea
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#2
Report 12 years ago
#2
there are many, many different forms of ion channels. my understanding is that one is affected, so chloride flow is reduced, causing mucus to thicken as water leaves the mucus on the epithelium, and enters the cells via osmosis (as there are far too many Cl- ions there).

however, Cl- are transported in the blood, and can still move by diffusion, and active transport using other channels, so overall chloride flow in the body as a whole is unlikely to be affected.
0
reply
Laura Lou
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#3
(Original post by sea tea)
there are many, many different forms of ion channels. my understanding is that one is affected, so chloride flow is reduced, causing mucus to thicken as water leaves the mucus on the epithelium, and enters the cells via osmosis (as there are far too many Cl- ions there).

however, Cl- are transported in the blood, and can still move by diffusion, and active transport using other channels, so overall chloride flow in the body as a whole is unlikely to be affected.
so Cl- are only transported via the cftr channel in the lungs/pancreas/liver/etc and they are transported in/out of other cells via different channel(s) in all other parts of the body?
0
reply
Twiglet
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#4
Report 12 years ago
#4
I'm pretty sure the CFTR is only found in the cells that line the lungs, digestive tract and sweat glands. There are other channels which transport the ions across other membranes.
0
reply
Laura Lou
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 12 years ago
#5
Thanks. I understand it better now. Am I on the right track with this:
http://www.cf.ac.uk/biosi/staff/jaco.../ionchan2.html ?
0
reply
idiopathic
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#6
Report 12 years ago
#6
From my lecturer's digestion book, I deduced thatthe CFTR channel transports Cl- out of cells into the lumen (eg of the pancreatic duct). If this channel is faulty, there is no build up a Cl- gradient, as normally Cl- would exchange into the cell for HCO3- out of the cell. So it results in a lack of HCO3- in the lumen which causes proteins to concentrate and plug, blocking the ducts.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of East Anglia
    All Departments Open 13:00-17:00. Find out more about our diverse range of subject areas and career progression in the Arts & Humanities, Social Sciences, Medicine & Health Sciences, and the Sciences. Postgraduate
    Wed, 30 Jan '19
  • Solent University
    Careers in maritime Undergraduate
    Sat, 2 Feb '19
  • Sheffield Hallam University
    City and Collegiate Campus Undergraduate
    Sun, 3 Feb '19

Do you have a role model?

Yes - I know them personally (293)
26.07%
Yes - they're famous (285)
25.36%
No I don't (546)
48.58%

Watched Threads

View All