Medicine in america? Watch

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sal33m
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#1
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#1
Does anyone know how long medical school in america lasts. Compared to the UK setup. I know you need a Bsc or something first, but ignoring that, how long is the actual medical school? (If it varies from institution to institution does anyonw know?)

Thx.
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Isaiah Berlin
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Med School is four years. There are probably accelerated programmes but I think the vast majority do stick to four years.
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WokSz
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may I ask how this is related to Oxbridge?
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sTe\/o
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(Original post by Isaiah Berlin)
Med School is four years. There are probably accelerated programmes but I think the vast majority do stick to four years.
It doesn't get much more accelerated than 4 years. I really don't know how they do it.
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claracw
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yes, this question does seem out of place -- why is it being asked in an oxbridge forum?

however, i know a bit about this. medical school is graduate school in america, so that means that you'll have to already have a bachelor's degree before you apply to med school (or be in the final year of undergrad when applying). they don't require you to have specific majors, esp if you are from an american college/university, as long as you've fulfilled all the "pre-med" requirements. check with specific medical schools for this. they also require you to have taken the MCATs (medical college admissions test, http://www.aamc.org/students/mcat/).

the normal length is four years, some schools do have accelerated programs, but they usually combine it with undergraduate studies, for example instead of the typical 4 years bachelors + 4 years med school, you can do it all in say 7 years. these programs are competitive, obviously, and schools want to know right from before you've left high school that you are committed to going to medical school and want a career in the medical profession (i guess this is very different from the UK system, where students fresh from high school study medicine). also, only some schools offer such a program -- i think brown does, but at this moment cannot think of any other.
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sTe\/o
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(Original post by claracw)
you can do it all in say 7 years. these programs are competitive, obviously, and schools want to know right from before you've left high school that you are committed to going to medical school and want a career in the medical profession (i guess this is very different from the UK system, where students fresh from high school study medicine).
Really? The only difference seems to be that it takes 5-6 years in the UK instead of 7.
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snmichaels
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Well, in the UK, you strictly study medicine for 5 years, 6 if you're doing an intercallated degree. In the US, for the first 4 years, you do pretty much any degree you want. The last 4 years, are strictly medicine. So, UK students start medicine at about 18-19. US students start medicine at about 22-23.

That's the difference.
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sTe\/o
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(Original post by snmichaels)
Well, in the UK, you strictly study medicine for 5 years, 6 if you're doing an intercallated degree. In the US, for the first 4 years, you do pretty much any degree you want. The last 4 years, are strictly medicine. So, UK students start medicine at about 18-19. US students start medicine at about 22-23.

That's the difference.
I was referring to the 7 year programme that claracw mentioned.
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claracw
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the accelerated course is special in america, and not every school offers it -- thus, only very few students actually end up doing it. most do the 4 + 4 years program, and admission to medical school after undergrad is difficult and competitive. i was pointing to a difference between UK and US systems as a *whole* -- the length 5/6/7/8 years is really not the issue at hand.

students in the UK start off with studies in the medical sciences and then go off to do clinical stuff (all in the 5/6 years), whereas in the US you start off with studies in whatever field you want (making sure to fulfill pre-medical requirements), graduate with a bachelors and then go off to medical school. the accelerated program just allows you to do all that in less than 8 years, and also guarantees you admission to medical school (i think a student may need to maintain some level of academic performance, though)

also, i mentioned that it is different because it is normal in UK for students to envision a medical profession for themselves before they leave high school (and applying to medical school in the final year of high school) whereas in the US the norm is for students to only really consider it while performing undergraduate studies. so, for a student to apply for a spot on the accelerated program, he/she must *really* be able to demonstrate a keen interest in being a doctor to be accepted, as he/she must be able to rise above the US mind set is that a person cannot be entirely sure that he/she wants to be a doctor before even embarking on university studies

so, really, very little to do with the length
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sTe\/o
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OK, I see where you're coming from now. To be honest, until you mentioned it I wasn't even aware that the 'accelerated course' structure existed in the US. Also, in the UK it is ironically the graduate medicine programme which is referred to as being an accelerated course, but that's by the by.

I can see what you mean when you say that the average US student isn't expected to know what they want to do when they apply to uni. I think it's a shame that we're expected to do so here in the UK, as I think you're forced to decide on what direction you want to follow far too early. Nevertheless, I would argue that even in the UK we are expected to go out of our way to show that medicine is really the right career for us, and the fact that everyone knows this means that everyone ends up chasing as much work experience and extracurriculars as possible in order to have the best cv. I don't see how they could you expect you to do any more than that for admission onto one of these accelerated programmes in the US. :confused: Academics alone are not enough to get you into medical school in the UK, except perhaps at Oxbridge (but even Oxbridge will expect you to have some work experience).
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