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    If you were a qualified English lawyer and were fluent in a language - lets say Spanish, would you be able to be an English lawyer working in Spain? Or would you need some sort of postgraduate qualification for that particular country to enable you to practice?

    Also to work in the USA instead of getting a JD could you just do an LLM?
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    If you want to pratice law in any country you need that countries law qualifications. If you wanted to be a lawyer in America you would have to pass the American Bar.
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    i think you can work in Europe - the LPC qualification etc are recognised but you have to sit exams in constitutional law etc for that country and there may be requirements such as your work for 6 months may have to be supervised by another solicitor.
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    As to the US...

    you can do the bar in NY and California if you have an LLB.

    However - to get employed is another thing alltogether.

    Some places will accept LLMs - but that is normally in tax - check out NYU's

    However without a JD you are fighting an uphill battle.
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    I would LOVE to work in America but I cant afford to do a JD next year, any solutions?
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    (Original post by kirstinx)
    I would LOVE to work in America but I cant afford to do a JD next year, any solutions?
    How old are you, have you begun university yet? Where do you plan to go?
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    Your best bet may be to work for an MC firm and try and get a secondment to that firm's NY office (if it has one). However, such secondments are rare.

    Unless you have some overwhelming desire to qualify in the US, then I'd concentrate on qualifying in the UK first.
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    (Original post by chalks)
    Your best bet may be to work for an MC firm and try and get a secondment to that firm's NY office (if it has one). However, such secondments are rare.

    Unless you have some overwhelming desire to qualify in the US, then I'd concentrate on qualifying in the UK first.
    Ditto although I would advise a NY firm's london office over the MC - they may well pay for you to do the NY bar while youre with them.

    Otherwise, if you are prepared to - you could do an LLB/JD between LSE or KCL and Columbia. That way you pay for two JD years instead of 3.
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    I will never get into the LLB/JD, my A Levels and GCSE's arent good enough.

    I am 17 planning on going to Lancaster, Newcastle or Northumbria
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    You cant do the JD straight after A-levels/high school, you need a degree in something else first (e.g. economics and history are quite common among lawyers). If it is an "uphill battle" to find employment in the USA without a JD, I suppose you could study an undergrad degree in the UK and then apply to do the JD. There are internationals who have done this, with the intention of building a career in the US. If you get a very good degree from a renowned UK institution you might even get a scholarship of some sort, thus alleviating the financial burden.
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    Agreed re: London office of an NY firm.

    I'd recommend going for the "normal" LLB for now and see how things pan out. Its early days for you to be working out how to qualify in the US before you've discovered whether the law is going to be for you at all!

    While you're at it - go for the Toon rather than Lancaster. I had three amazing years there although there were times I could have sworn we'd drifted north of the Arctic Circle.
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    Why are you so set on the US at age 17?
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    I've been set on Law and the US since about 13 but then I didnt know that getting a Law degree from the UK was useless in the US and degrees in the US were very expensive.

    I probably wont get into a MC firm, I didnt decide to do Law for the money.
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    (Original post by chalks)
    Agreed re: London office of an NY firm.

    I'd recommend going for the "normal" LLB for now and see how things pan out. Its early days for you to be working out how to qualify in the US before you've discovered whether the law is going to be for you at all!

    While you're at it - go for the Toon rather than Lancaster. I had three amazing years there although there were times I could have sworn we'd drifted north of the Arctic Circle.
    Your degree was in the UK, how did you end up in Australia? What additional qualifications etc did you need to do?
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    Many English lawyers come across to Oz. The law and legal system here is very similar to that in the UK - for obvious reasons.

    Once here you can generally work for an Australian firm provided your signature etc has the note "Admitted in England & Wales only" after it. However, it is easy to requalify - you need to sit an exam in Constitutional Law and then do a couple of courses in accounting and ethics which are similar to what used to be called the Professional Skills Course in the UK.

    Easy peasy.
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    My parents are considering emigrating to Australia within the next couple of years. They've been talking about it for ages, but have only got serious recently.

    I'm in my first year LLB, so I'd probably emigrate too. We're going to Australia in the summer for a while to check things out woo!
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    (Original post by chalks)
    Many English lawyers come across to Oz. The law and legal system here is very similar to that in the UK - for obvious reasons.

    Once here you can generally work for an Australian firm provided your signature etc has the note "Admitted in England & Wales only" after it. However, it is easy to requalify - you need to sit an exam in Constitutional Law and then do a couple of courses in accounting and ethics which are similar to what used to be called the Professional Skills Course in the UK.

    Easy peasy.
    If only I wanted to go to Australia
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    What's wrong with Oz?
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    Nothing, I just dont want to live there. Although it would probably be easier for me to get my boyfriend and his son to move to Australia over America.

    I would also be interested in Spain or Italy if the US was a complete no go, although I would need to learn the language.
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    Honestly, I think you need to pass your LL.B before planning your emmigration! Lots can happen between now and then!
 
 
 
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