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MSc Finance: Cam Vs Ox Vs LSE watch

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    I am trying to weigh up the pros and cons of the following postgraduate courses:

    1. MPhil Finance Cambridge
    2. MSc Financial Economics Oxford
    3. MSc Finance & Economics LSE

    Does anyone have information on the competitiveness of these courses, costs, personal experiences (from friends), view of IBs, timescale of application, GRE/GMAT or anything in general. I am struggling to find out about the preparation and details of GMAT/GRE.

    I am keen on doing a one year post-degree Finance related course and these are the three I am really keen on. Thoughts?
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    Mphil is overall more academic - so I would strike that off and look closer at OX and LSE.
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    I appreciate that the MPhil sounds more academic, but I personally think studying at one of these institutions, particularly Oxbridge would be so much fun (and hard work).
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    MPhils are research degrees. Whereas MScs are taught degrees.
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    Not always. Oxford's MPhil in Economics is a taught degree. However the Oxford Financial Economics degree is an MFE.

    The MFE is a brilliant course, the flagship of the new business school. However it is an academic course, and some people have found it's not perfectly set up to go into IB. If you like finance and want to spend a year studying it, it's a fantastic course. I for one would love to take it at some point. However if it's just a year to get into IB, then go to LSE, as the course is far more designed for that.
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    Does anyone have more details about the GRE / GMAT requirement?
    I'm keen on doing them, but not if it requires too much effort.
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    (Original post by StudentUK)
    Does anyone have more details about the GRE / GMAT requirement?
    I'm keen on doing them, but not if it requires too much effort.

    You need a 90th percentile mark. It's a lot of work. Don't bother applying to top masters if you don't want to do much efforts for these tests.
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    Sorry for my previous trite remarks.

    Yes, I am prepared to work hard, but just not to slave away for a severely long time.

    Do you know how much time it takes a reasonably intelligent person to prepare for either of the tests? What is the distinction between GMAT/GRE?

    Also, what sort of people get onto either of the courses named above?
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    (Original post by StudentUK)
    Sorry for my previous trite remarks.

    Yes, I am prepared to work hard, but just not to slave away for a severely long time.

    Do you know how much time it takes a reasonably intelligent person to prepare for either of the tests? What is the distinction between GMAT/GRE?

    Also, what sort of people get onto either of the courses named above?
    I would say 4 months.
    There is basically no difference between GMAT and GRE. In the US GRE is used for PhD's and GMAT for MBA's. So basically, a 90th percentile GRE is equivalent to the same score at GMAT. I know the wrtting part is more tricky at GMAT. But the verbal and Quant sections are pritty much the same (and the important ones).

    It's all about being fast, about getting a gymnastic and understand their logic. You don't need to have academic pre requisites since the level itslef is very low. It's only about practicing a lot and do the exercices over and over again. So you can start revising very early and do some practise several times a week. But it's not like you have to study in your room for days and sacrify your routine.
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    Ok. So, I'll be working for 10 weeks over the summer. I'll have my summer holidays (after uni ends) from the start of June till mid September. Would that give me enough time to prepare?
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    (Original post by StudentUK)
    Ok. So, I'll be working for 10 weeks over the summer. I'll have my summer holidays (after uni ends) from the start of June till mid September. Would that give me enough time to prepare?
    I studied august + sept and I just worked seriously for 2 weeks but it didn't do quite well (75th percentile). If I got in it's only because I had very good GPA and Statement. If you manage to concentrate a bit better than me and try to forget you are in holidays, you should be able to hit a nice score.

    10 weeks is totally doable, really.
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    Sorry, I didn't make myself clear. By working for 10 weeks, I will be doing paid employment. However, I will have the weekends free and some of June and some of September.

    How do you go about applying for GMAT/GRE and when are the tests?
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    (Original post by StudentUK)
    Sorry, I didn't make myself clear. By working for 10 weeks, I will be doing paid employment. However, I will have the weekends free and some of June and some of September.

    How do you go about applying for GMAT/GRE and when are the tests?
    that's not a big problem. You suscribe on the net and you can choose any day you want. Try to book 2 weeks in advance if you are sitting in sept since a lot of peop will be thinking of doing so.
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    How did you go about preparing (books, websites etc) for GMAT/GRE? Which one did you do?
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    There's the Kaplan London course. My flatmate is doing that. Apparently is good.
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    (Original post by fonzievision)
    There's the Kaplan London course. My flatmate is doing that. Apparently is good.
    to the contrary (at least according to what i've heard); imo the courses are OK, but not really worth the money...the books really teach you everything you need

    i started preparing for the GMAT 3 or 4 weeks in advance, while working full-time (i studied about 1-2 hours per day until the test date)...you just have to be really dedicated
    it was sufficient to score a 700 / 93%

    if you want to spend some cash on preparing for the test, go and buy a couple of preperation books and download prep programs from the net...they teach you the same stuff as they do on the courses (i borrowed 4 prep books from the library)

    you also might want to consider booking your test date more than 2 weeks in advance; as it has been said earlier, if you do the test in autumn, there will be a lotr of other people wanting to do the test, so it might be a good thing to book your test date maybe 4 weeks in advancea
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    What does the GMAT test consist of?
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    (Original post by ElWilson)
    What does the GMAT test consist of?
    http://www.mba.com/mba/TaketheGMAT/T...verviewNEW.htm
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    (Original post by zerocool)
    to the contrary (at least according to what i've heard); imo the courses are OK, but not really worth the money...the books really teach you everything you need
    Well, if one has the money and it is no issue, they are definitely worth it, if only for some of the strategies and techniques they teach you. They're also good for some test takers who have not been in contact with some math for a while.
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    Do you guys think that it is doable for a student who is not in finance but in politics like me.I'm considering a career in IB but I'm doing a BA in politics and american studies at nottingham uni next september.

    I'm willing to prepare myself for a long time if i have to review the maths knowledge etc...

    I'd like to do a masters in finance if i can at either lse , oxford, cambridge , bocconi or insead-->no others!

    Can we take it several times ?

    Thanks
 
 
 
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