Computing Science & ICT Consultancy Watch

fat_hobbit
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#1
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Hey,

I am currently a first year Computing Science/psychology student. The course so far unsupprisingly consists of ALOT of programming.

I am enjoying it, but I have realised that I really do not want to be a professional programmer for the entire lifespan of my career. It can be tedious and very boring at times.

I have decided that after my degree, at one point in my life I would really like to work as a ICT consultant (preferably for a company such as IBM) , soley because I really enjoy interacting with people - something which I can imagine can be somewhat lacking if all I did all day was create code & debug lines and lines of endless code.

Have I made the right choice by doing Computing Science at degree level? Or would I have to do a masters in business management afterwards?

I am currently under the impression that Computing Science is the right choice to make, as it gives you core programming skills which I could imagine will be invaluable if you had to consult a business about the technical aspects of their ICT infelstructure e.g. software, internet.

Thanks for your help.
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hallucination
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Hi

I worked for an IT Consultancy for a while and so will hopefully be able to help you. Most major IT Consultancies (IBM, CapGemini etc) recruit able graduates from any discipline to work as consultants, and most expect a 2i or above from a good university. The consultants I met came from a mixture of backgrounds, ranging from english to engineering; if you've got a good degree, it's more a case of how you perform in the interview and the assessment days and whether your face fits. Basically, a masters degree may be a slight benefit on your application but it is definitely not essential.

Useful links:
http://www-05.ibm.com/employment/uk/...ook/index.html
http://www.uk.capgemini.com/careers/graduate/
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fat_hobbit
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Thanks for your reply.

I goto the uni of Aberdeen, which is ranked 28th in the league tables , would a 2i from there be fine? For Computing Science last year it was ranked just outside the top 20s, 21 I think. I remember it being one place behind Durham last time I looked (which happens to be ranked 20 this year).
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hallucination
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(Original post by xyz2k6)
Thanks for your reply.

I goto the uni of Aberdeen, which is ranked 28th in the league tables , would a 2i from there be fine? For Computing Science last year it was ranked just outside the top 20s, 21 I think. I remember it being one place behind Durham last time I looked (which happens to be ranked 20 this year).
Yeah sure - Aberdeen is a very good university...you don't need to be an Oxbridge graduate to get into consultancy!
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G_H_G
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I'm also thinking about getting into IT consultancy once I graduate. Would it be better if I do a Computer Science with Business course or straight Computer Science? Or would it not make any difference?
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hallucination
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(Original post by G_H_G)
I'm also thinking about getting into IT consultancy once I graduate. Would it be better if I do a Computer Science with Business course or straight Computer Science? Or would it not make any difference?
It really doesn't matter to be honest. Do the course that interests you the most - that way when you do go to a job interview, you'll be able to talk about what you studied with more passion and enthusiasm, and that's what employers like. A Comp Sci and Business course would offer more flexibility but generally, straight Computer Science courses at good universities contain a 'professional strand' anyway, offering modules related to the application of computers and computer skills to businesses and the real world.
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popsical
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(Original post by xyz2k6)
Hey,

I am currently a first year Computing Science/psychology student. The course so far unsupprisingly consists of ALOT of programming.

I am enjoying it, but I have realised that I really do not want to be a professional programmer for the entire lifespan of my career. It can be tedious and very boring at times.

I have decided that after my degree, at one point in my life I would really like to work as a ICT consultant (preferably for a company such as IBM) , soley because I really enjoy interacting with people - something which I can imagine can be somewhat lacking if all I did all day was create code & debug lines and lines of endless code.

Have I made the right choice by doing Computing Science at degree level? Or would I have to do a masters in business management afterwards?

I am currently under the impression that Computing Science is the right choice to make, as it gives you core programming skills which I could imagine will be invaluable if you had to consult a business about the technical aspects of their ICT infelstructure e.g. software, internet.

Thanks for your help.
Just because you do a degree in a subject does not mean you have to follow that subjects career path.
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SeanC
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"preferably for a company such as IBM" I wouldn't count on it with all the outsourcing occuring ine the ICT sector.. alot of jobs are going to cheap labour in Africa and India, and IBM is one of the biggest culprites for this... ICT skills are great but most jobs especially contractual jobs require you to have a vast range of skills from MQ to Cics to DB2 to Oracle along with numerous lesser skills such as RAKF. Most places want to hire someone already security cleared.. and with the massive numbers of already out of work programmers from previous outsourcing willing to work harder for less money and with broader skills its a tought market to make any real money on nowadays. The implications of being a contractor also mean you could be out of work for indefinite periods. The long term jobs are also reasonably insecure unfortunately... and ICT skills although valuable are becoming far more common.. better to have other skills to fall back on if required. Good luck though! if you need any advice about this send me a pm.
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