Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Final Year Projects [technical/scientific] watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    A few questions regarding scientific/technical dissertations/project reports...whatever you folk call them. There are a few points which are vague on the marking scheme and I figured some of you may have already tried to make sense of them since the requirements won't be wildly varied between unis.

    On the final report guideline list it says the usual; intro, review of related work, results, discussion etc etc but how would I go about checklisting the 'project execution' and my 'technical competences'?

    It says under execution: describe project progress.
    And under technical competence: demonstrate competences used during project e.g. analysis, deduction, construction, design.

    I'm not sure if I should explicitly cover those points or just ensure that they're covered within the normal bulk of my report. What does everyone else think? How can I explain my methodology when 3/4 of my work was research and 1/4 was calculations?

    In a past report I covered 'technical competences' by simply listing all the skills I had used and learnt during that project; the lecturer marking it gave me an A+ for that particular section. But thats still not confirmation enough, I never see that section in other people's work. Does methodology not apply because I didn't do any practical work?

    Normally I would ask my lecturers, but they're all away on holiday. My actual project supervisor had no idea what a logbook was when I told him he needed to mark mine, so I think his guess is as good as mine anyway. Hehe
    • CV Helper
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    CV Helper
    For my project this year, I've done a pretty theoretical project (possibly similar to yours in that it was mainly research and calculations) so I've got a similar problem! I'm including a "Project Management" section which has things like a timetable showing what I did when (could satisfy your "project execution" requirement?) and an explanation of how I prevented and solved problems. As for the technical competences, since that includes stuff like analysis and design, etc. I imagine it could be sufficient just to write a well-structured report to demonstrate that in such a theoretical sounding project. You could explain somewhere about the process you went through when researching, which could count as a technical competence...
    Hope that gives you some ideas, even though it probably doesn't completely solve your problem!
    Jenn xx
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by black_mamba)
    I'm not sure if I should explicitly cover those points or just ensure that they're covered within the normal bulk of my report. What does everyone else think? How can I explain my methodology when 3/4 of my work was research and 1/4 was calculations?
    Exactly what were you doing? I don't understand what you mean by 'research' in this context - do you mean literature surveys. Your methodology is how you set up the calculations and what calculations you did.

    In a past report I covered 'technical competences' by simply listing all the skills I had used and learnt during that project; the lecturer marking it gave me an A+ for that particular section. But thats still not confirmation enough, I never see that section in other people's work. Does methodology not apply because I didn't do any practical work?
    Methodology always applies, if you are doing computation it should be about which packages, functionals, etc. you have used in your calculations and how you set them up. in silico experiments still have a methodology.

    Normally I would ask my lecturers, but they're all away on holiday. My actual project supervisor had no idea what a logbook was when I told him he needed to mark mine, so I think his guess is as good as mine anyway. Hehe
    The logbook is where you record what you have done on a daily basis - it need not be a real book, it could be electronic. You should really record what you have done and when you have done it during the course of your work for later reference regardless of whether your work is practical or not.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Methodology always applies, if you are doing computation it should be about which packages, functionals, etc. you have used in your calculations and how you set them up. in silico experiments still have a methodology.
    hehe
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Exactly what were you doing? I don't understand what you mean by 'research' in this context - do you mean literature surveys. Your methodology is how you set up the calculations and what calculations you did.

    Methodology always applies, if you are doing computation it should be about which packages, functionals, etc. you have used in your calculations and how you set them up. in silico experiments still have a methodology.
    Ok that makes sense. I didn't mean literature survey no. I'm studying a specific type of engine vibration and was researching detection techniques hoping to compile a small mini-report on the various methods, and compare them quantitatively somehow. Thats 1/4 of it anyway.

    The logbook is where you record what ......
    Hehe I know, but my sup' had no idea. Quite amusing. :p:

    Thanks for the ideas everyone. :cool:
 
 
 
Poll
Do I go to The Streets tomorrow night?
Useful resources
Uni match

Applying to uni?

Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Articles:

Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

Quick link:

Educational debate unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.