What Are The Best Extra Curricular Activities To Secure A Top Tc Or Pupillage Watch

TommehR
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#41
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#41
(Original post by Ethereal)
Would you do voluntary work you didn't enjoy merely because it looks good on your CV?
I'd find some voluntary work that I did enjoy. :p:
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Ethereal
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#42
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(Original post by DanBan)
YES! if its helping the community and its contributing to my cv then i would bloody do it even if i hated it!
Having trained volunteers, I can tell you that the WORST possible volunteer is the one who is only doing it for their CV. In order to get maximum benefit for the organization you are working for you need to be fully commited. PEople doing it for their CV tend to do the minimum required.
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Ethereal
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#43
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(Original post by TommehR)
I'd find some voluntary work that I did enjoy. :p:
That's what I've been arguing in favour of all along. I'm not saying don't do ECs to bolster a CV ... I'm saying do ones you ENJOY that will bolster your CV.

I find it hard to believe with the range available that someone cannot get all the skills they require whilst still doing something they enjoy.
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TommehR
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I must say that doing voluntary work that you don't enjoy seems a bit cold-hearted. I'd say that more than any other EC activity you have to enjoy and get involved with voluntary work. Say I was living in a retirement home and a university student volunteered to come in and help me, I'd be distraught if I found out that they didn't really want to and were only doing it to put on their CV.
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TommehR
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#45
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(Original post by Ethereal)
That's what I've been arguing in favour of all along. I'm not saying don't do ECs to bolster a CV ... I'm saying do ones you ENJOY that will bolster your CV.

I find it hard to believe with the range available that someone cannot get all the skills they require whilst still doing something they enjoy.
I do agree with you. But I think that a lot of people are going to have to do some stuff that they don't like in order to benefit themselves in the long run.
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DanBan
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#46
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[QUOTE=Ethereal]Having trained volunteers, I can tell you that the WORST possible volunteer is the one who is only doing it for their CV. In order to get maximum benefit for the organization you are working for you need to be fully commited. PEople doing it for their CV tend to do the minimum required.[/QUOTE

you can be fully committed to something that u dnt enjoy.....im fully committed to my studies although alot of the time i do not enjoy them!! and i didnt say i would do it ONLY do it for my cv, by for the community as well, which u conveniently fogot to include. and i have done volunteering through my school that i did not particularly enjoy, but was fully committed to it as i knew that it would help the wider community. we are not all mother theresa, but we can still do our bit without necessarily being madly passionate about it.
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Dreama
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#47
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Please note, the following recipe does not guarantee results and is merely advisory. Sense of humour and pinch of salt also helpful.

The Magic Formula~

Add a sparkling set of GCSE's...(reinforced by amazing results since Year 1.. at the very least your Year 2 project on the Ancient Egyptians should have gained you at least a gold star. At least. Your Year 3 "My Home Town" Poster should also have been displayed on the family fridge...)
Mix well with gleaming A levels.. (Note - do not add Law/Music/Dance/Theatre A level to the recipe at this stage as this well cause the mix to curdle...and you will die.)
Stir in a nice dash of over-edited and artificial Personal statement and generic references..
Drop a pinch of "100% UMS" and "Billy has been a pleasure to teach.."
Pile in generous quantities of gushing rubbish... "Justice has always been an intricate part of my DNA... The Law simply pulsates through my veins!"
Give the LNAT score a good shake, 20 should do it...
Choose a nice flavouring in the form of a University that has been approved by some snotty kid in his living room in Slough giving you advice over TSR...
Keep stirring the mix until you produce a nice healthy 2:1 or above...
Sprinkle in a generous amount of extra curriculars - (Note: You will be expected to have donated at least two vital bodily organs and volunteered with at least one endangered species...Preferably something dangerous. Yes, tigers will do.)
Pour in a large amount of daddy's contacts and mix well with mummy's dress sense,
Et voila!

You my friend, have your cake. Now go eat it.
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Ethereal
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#48
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^lol^
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Onearmedbandit
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#49
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Jo, you ever considered working for Oxbridge Admissions? :p:

:hitit:
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DanBan
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i like ur style dreama lol
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Dreama
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#51
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(Original post by Onearmedbandit)
Jo, you ever considered working for Oxbridge Admissions? :p:

:hitit:
You joke, but I think if they're still struggling to distinguish between AAA candidates then they should give me a call...

A good ol' Egg-and-spoon race would soon see who was the better candidate.
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DanBan
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#52
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(Original post by TommehR)
I must say that doing voluntary work that you don't enjoy seems a bit cold-hearted. I'd say that more than any other EC activity you have to enjoy and get involved with voluntary work. Say I was living in a retirement home and a university student volunteered to come in and help me, I'd be distraught if I found out that they didn't really want to and were only doing it to put on their CV.
i get what ur saying....i actually went to a retirement home and danced for the people there lol, and sat down with them and chatted quite a while ago....i didnt do that for any other reason than i wanted to help them and make them feel good....didnt end up in my ps or anything like that, it just was something i did, and tbh knowing that i made them feel happy made me feel happy...the actual activity itself was rather boring, not to sound a *****, but it was, but i knew it was worthwhile, so i was more than happy to do it.
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Ethereal
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Or seeing as how were are "non-conformists trying to push others to conform to our non-conformist ethos" , we could just pick the quirkiest candidates and tell those we reject

"sorry you're just too non-conformist to our non-conformist ways"
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IC Law
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There is always the possibility that the OP posted his question not to have his future extra-curricular activities dictated to him, but rather to get a list of activities it would be worth investigating at some point before he applies for a TC. The OP never said he was going to do all the activities suggested, so I'm guessing all he wants is a little guidance as to what kind of things look good on a CV so he can explore whether they are the kind of things he enjoys when he tries them. Let's remember that not everyone will necessarily have been exposed to debating, positions of responsibility etc etc at high school so they may not know what these activities are like. Maybe his query is less about what he should be doing to be a conformist TC candidate and more about the kind of skills it would be worth picking up through such activities, although I grant you his phraseology could lead you to interpret his post as the former.

Furthermore, just because an activity may appear "boring" before someone actually starts doing it, doesn't mean that they won't get in to it and eventually come to enjoy it. People's tastes do change, particularly at university. Perhaps he doesn't want to rule certain pastimes out of hand that currently appear dull to him, but that he might get a lot out of both CV- and enjoyment-wise if he gave them a real go.

I do agree with Ethereal that the worst volunteers are the ones who are only doing it for bonus CV points (I have encountered many of these type of people so am basing this on bitter experience). I further understand that endless "what's the best..." threads are tedious. Having said that, people come on here for advice so dismissing such enquiries so readily in the way the OP was is somewhat inappropriate and not particularly constructive for those who might be reading that are less advanced in their legal careers and don't have a clue how the world of TCs work. Let's try not to jump down these posters' throats quite so readily and put them off Law for life!

Finally, I think chalks gave the best advice on this topic (that the skills developed are the most important aspect of extra-curriculars for the CV) and would suggest the OP takes this on board.
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dragon_1706
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I think that if you take up extra curriculars especially for your CV, it's unlikely you're going to be able to talk or write very passionately about them. I'm sure it's possible to fake it, but it has to be preferable to spend your spare time doing stuff that you actually enjoy.
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IC Law
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(Original post by dragon_1706)
I think that if you take up extra curriculars especially for your CV, it's unlikely you're going to be able to talk or write very passionately about them. I'm sure it's possible to fake it, but it has to be preferable to spend your spare time doing stuff that you actually enjoy.
I totally agree. However I just think that people are making the assumption that the OP is only asking because he only wants to do activities that are "worthwhile" for his CV regardless of whether he enjoys them or not. There are other reasons why he could have asked his original question, so I believe that we should give him the benefit of the doubt instead and be constructive rather than assume the worst.
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manthi
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#57
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Just another viewpoint:

At the end of the day, isnt Law and TCs the toughest of the lot? Arent there 1200 people applying for 20 jobs? (Random figure) Isnt it worth taking up an EC that you do not entirely "love" for the sake of it giving you that little bit of advantage when it comes to getting a TC? Obviously, if you absolutely detest a particular EC then taking it up for CV points may be questionable, but most ECs are not so terrible that you would hate with a passion. You may not love it, but you most likely wont hate it to its core either. If such is the case, isnt it worth, say, running for LawSoc President for the fact that it gives you that little bit of an extra mile that you need to beat out the other 500 who are after the same job as you?

Ethereal: I agree that people shouldnt do ECs that they absolutely despise merely for CV points. But the way you advocate only doing ECs that people consider fun, you make the presumption that all those people will get a good TC by merely doing the ECs that are "fun"; when in reality it is hardly the case. You may be someone who achieved it, but its unlikely that many of us will enjoy the same fate. At the end of the day, when you have to compete at the top level, you need to make certain sacrifices; sacrifices where sometimes all of us have to undertake some voluntary work that we may not particulary consider as fun, or, running for LawSoc Secretary that may not be the best way of spending time for us. After all, those ECs will give you that extra bit of edge that you need when competing so hard- whether we like it or not, we have to do certain things we dont like at some point in our lives. Giving a happy-go-lucky attitude of telling people "Do only Ecs that YOU consider fun and dont give two hoots about how your CV will look" is just wrong.
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Ethereal
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If you have read what I've put properly you will notice I observe many if not all ECs give transferable skills. It is all about what you do with them, and how you present them.

Clearly clubbing per se does not give transferable skills, but if you are the person always responsible for organizing outings and making sure everyone is safe it does.

This applies to many others .... rugby at first glance teaches you nothing for a job, however if you think about it it teaches you teamwork, communication, decision making and social skills. every player on the pitch is responsible for other people's saftey, therefore it teaches you responsibility as well.

Sewing .... teahces you attention to detail.
Rowing .... teamwork, planning, communication, drive, determination.

I could go on. As I have said MANY times you can get the skills you require whilst doing something you enjoy!
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manthi
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Alright then, lets take an example:

Two applicants A and B. A has been the LawSoc President, although, he has not had the greatest time of his life being so. He did not particularly love it, but still he went along with it for the fact that a) it teaches his some invaluable lessons b) it certainly does not hurt on a CV. B has been a fanatic of sewing since her tender ages, and had a very happy-go-lucky attitude, believed that if she did what she enjoyed, it'll come through for her. So she has sewing in her CV.

Who do you reckon will get the TC? A, who, albeit his lower passion for what he did, was the LawSoc President, or B, who, with immense passion, has sewing.

Its unquestionable that there will always be certain ECs that employers prefer than others, no matter how much you liked it or not. How many times in our lives have we done things that, although they were not particularly enjoyable, we did it because we thought we'd learn something from it, or it would help us in the future? Same principle. You dont have to go around ticking boxes of "LawSoc President" if you've hated responsibility all your life, but, if you dont have a passion against it, then why not go for it? Wont it help you in your future? Wont you learn some invaluable lessons off it?
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different?
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The thing which concerns me is that say you take up an EC but don't go far in it ie don't become President of ...blah blah blah, or champion of ...sport, although you still have developed the skills, surely firms don't view as such as shining star? Sometimes it can be very difficult to achieve the top in a field in which is heavily opportunity based, I would therefore hope that any EC's would be looked upon favourably for the skills. I mean, in the long run, although it shows you have a commendable talent to have got so far in a certain field, it's not going to be enough to transform an inidividual into the best of the bunch for a TC. Personally I would believe that a strong degree and interview are more likely to turn the tables ultimately. Have i got completely the wrong end of stick?
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