Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    heya, really hope someone can help coz i keep changing my mind about where i want to go and really need another opinion!! ive got an offer for straight law from exeter {AAA} and an offer for law with american law from uea {AAA}. i really liked both places and just wanted to know which one is more respected etc.? i would like to go to america in the future so don't know if that makes a big difference?
    thanks to anyone who replies and sorry for all the questions!!!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    uea the american course is really good i had a few friends who did it!
    and uea is great :-)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    i would definitely go for the uea course! When i was thinking of applying there, i was really attracted to that course, as like you i plan to work in america once i graduate.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    if you are keen on going to the US, guess it's obvious then UEA will be your best bet.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Am I right to assume that the UEA course still won't qualify you in the US? You'll still need to take the JD after completion of the LLB. I wouldn't base your decision mainly on the fact that it includes American Law.

    Apart from that, I can't help you with making your decision. I know next to nothing about the two universities in question other than my friend hated the Law open day at Exeter that he went to. Hardly a basis for me to advise against it, eh?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TommehR)
    Am I right to assume that the UEA course still won't qualify you in the US? You'll still need to take the JD after completion of the LLB. I wouldn't base your decision mainly on the fact that it includes American Law.

    Apart from that, I can't help you with making your decision. I know next to nothing about the two universities in question other than my friend hated the Law open day at Exeter that he went to. Hardly a basis for me to advise against it, eh?

    In the states of New York and California an English LL.B is a qualifying degree. It allows you to sit for the State bar, which all JD students must do before practice anyway. Once you are admitted to the bar in NY or CA, you can use that as a qualifier to sit the bar in other states.

    A JD, therefore, is not essential.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ethereal)
    In the states of New York and California an English LL.B is a qualifying degree. It allows you to sit for the State bar, which all JD students must do before practice anyway. Once you are admitted to the bar in NY or CA, you can use that as a qualifier to sit the bar in other states.

    A JD, therefore, is not essential.
    Hmm, I imagine that it's going to be quite a struggle though if you are trying to get a job in a big Law firm over there. If you just have an LLB from somewhere other than Oxbridge I imagine you are likely to get overlooked in favour of the top Ivy League graduates, Columbia, etc. I'd imagine they are going to have a far better understanding of the American legal system and will have more years' experience.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Agreed, it will be a struggle but even with a JD it would be. According to an American I spoke to they will always prefer to employ an American even if an English applicant shows the same level of qualification.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TommehR)
    Hmm, I imagine that it's going to be quite a struggle though if you are trying to get a job in a big Law firm over there. If you just have an LLB from somewhere other than Oxbridge I imagine you are likely to get overlooked in favour of the top Ivy League graduates, Columbia, etc. I'd imagine they are going to have a far better understanding of the American legal system and will have more years' experience.
    From what I understand it's only the Oxbridge and University of London (internal) LLBs that are routinely accepted for admission to the NY Bar. I think California is a little more flexible.

    That's not to say candidates with LLBs from other universities can't apply, but I think there is far more red tape, paperpushing and hoop-jumping involved to prove the equivalence of your qualifications if you're not from Oxbridge/UoL.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IC Law)
    From what I understand it's only the Oxbridge and University of London (internal) LLBs that are routinely accepted for admission to the NY Bar. I think California is a little more flexible.

    That's not to say candidates with LLBs from other universities can't apply, but I think there is far more red tape, paperpushing and hoop-jumping involved to prove the equivalence of your qualifications if you're not from Oxbridge/UoL.

    NY Bar association webiste says they accept an LL.B from a university in England where that degree would be qualifying for practice here.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ethereal)
    NY Bar association webiste says they accept an LL.B from a university in England where that degree would be qualifying for practice here.
    They probably just say that though.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ethereal)
    NY Bar association webiste says they accept an LL.B from a university in England where that degree would be qualifying for practice here.
    Yes. My point was not that they won't accept you with an LLB from elsewhere, but that the NY bar specifically routinely accepts Oxbridge and UoL LLBs/BAs. In all other cases one has to prove equivalency.

    Full details of requirements are outlined in a document from the Americal Bar Association that you can download from the URL below:

    http://www.abanet.org/legaled/public...05/chart10.pdf
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    LL.Bs from other universities are equivalent by virtue of being a qualifying law degree ergo if your degree is qualifying for the purposes of practice in England and Wales it is equivalent
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ethereal)
    LL.Bs from other universities are equivalent by virtue of being a qualifying law degree ergo if your degree is qualifying for the purposes of practice in England and Wales it is equivalent
    Logically yes but IC Law is correct: you still have to prove it is equivalent, and only really oxbridge/london degrees are assumed to be without more. The New York bar is apparently less than convinced of the 'all qualifying law degrees are created equal' principle...
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    thanks for the help everyone! i'm still undecided and driving all my friends and family mad but you have all given me something to think about! at the moment, i'm thinking it may be better to go to exeter for 3 years and then go to the u.s, look for a job and, if i have to, try to the jd rather than spend 4 years at uea and end up in the same position! sorry again for the endless questions but since you all seem to know what you're talking about, does that make sense?? xxx
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I'd still suggest UEA if you were looking into working in America. You will get to know the environment better- you will be likely to make more connections for the future... In the end of course it is up to you, but I would go for UEA
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Go for UEA. Sounds like an interesting course with America Law even if you didn't want to work there in the future.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: April 17, 2006

University open days

  • University of Bradford
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Buckinghamshire New University
    All Faculties Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Heriot-Watt University
    All Schools Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.