tiger306
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Hi

One of my exams is open book (tort), last year I got my lowest mark in the open book exam (60), does anyone have any tips on how to tackle these exams effectively and what kind of preparation I should be doing (other than reading and highlighting the relevant chapters!) Thanks
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ellewoods
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(Original post by tiger306)
Hi

One of my exams is open book (tort), last year I got my lowest mark in the open book exam (60), does anyone have any tips on how to tackle these exams effectively and what kind of preparation I should be doing (other than reading and highlighting the relevant chapters!) Thanks
Check the guidelines at your uni if you are planning on highlighting the actual textbook you're taking into the exam - at my uni they have to be completely unannotated, and if there is so much as a bent corner of a page, the book will be confiscated. It has to be "as it was when it left the bookshop" apparently.

I also got my lowest mark in an open book exam.
My advice would be, use your textbook constantly to look things up so you get ultra-familiar with where things are in the book, but otherwise, treat it as a closed book exam. Ultimately, you haven't got time to actually *read* the book in the exam, its just reference, so if you know the material as if you *didnt* have the book, you'll do much better.

Regarding revision in general, don't just read - make notes, expand your notes, reduce them back down to bullet points and key words, use colours and draw diagrams and charts and stick them on your wall (it does go into your brain I promise! :p: ) and answer as many past / practice exam questions as humanly possible.
If you have a tolerant friend, I would also advise explaining a concept to them, ie, get them to read a scenario, and then you explain whether or not they have a claim, and why. Explaining things in layman terms helps your understanding, and also helps cement the information into your brain!!

Good luck
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tiger306
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Ah thanks! We can take in anything, including notes, but I will check to make sure highlighting is allowed!!
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Ethereal
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(Original post by tiger306)
Ah thanks! We can take in anything, including notes, but I will check to make sure highlighting is allowed!!
We'd get hung
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octanethriller
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Well if you have been doing the reading through out the year, then you should have a full set of notes. What you then do is take those full notes and then condense them so that they cover the important material and points of law that have been flagged up as relevant throughout the year. Then read through em, learn what you can and have a very good idea where the material is should you need it. Well that's what worked for me.
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