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    Is anyone doing a degree course which is more on the social side than biological side? I am trying to find a uni with a more social sided psychology course but am having problems finding one.
    If anyone knows then I was wondering where you can study psychology with the more social element, what the course is like, if there is an option to do a placement etc,
    Any help would be much appreciated
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    'Applied' Psychology is what you're looking for. thats social psychology.
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    (Original post by El Scotto)

    'Applied' Psychology is what you're looking for. thats social psychology.
    What? No it's not. Applied psychology covers things such as ergonomics, educational and occupational psychology. Not social psychology.
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    Social Psychology is available at Sussex and Loughborough and I'm sure many other unis (I just googled it )
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    (Original post by Epoch157)
    What? No it's not. Applied psychology covers things such as ergonomics, educational and occupational psychology. Not social psychology.

    When I went to a uni open day, with regard to the subject of applied psychology, I sat through a lecture where they were telling me Applied psychology is social psychology. They cut out all the animal things, and all the statisitcal bits and focus on the social side of things. How psychology is applied to humans. This was only a couple of weeks ago, my memory is generally good too.
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    (Original post by El Scotto)

    When I went to a uni open day, with regard to the subject of applied psychology, I sat through a lecture where they were telling me Applied psychology is social psychology. They cut out all the animal things, and all the statisitcal bits and focus on the social side of things. How psychology is applied to humans. This was only a couple of weeks ago, my memory is generally good too.
    Which Uni was this?
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    (Original post by InsertName)
    Which Uni was this?

    this one was brighton.
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    (Original post by El Scotto)

    this one was brighton.
    aha, thank you.
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    If you look at Sussex Uni's website they do offer a Soc Psych degree course
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    (Original post by El Scotto)

    When I went to a uni open day, with regard to the subject of applied psychology, I sat through a lecture where they were telling me Applied psychology is social psychology. They cut out all the animal things, and all the statisitcal bits and focus on the social side of things. How psychology is applied to humans. This was only a couple of weeks ago, my memory is generally good too.
    Yeah, and I'm just about to finish a three-year BSc in Psych at Bristol. I'm right.
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    so if i want to be an occupational psychologist :

    -what is the pay bracket?

    i no you have to do a course accredited by the BPS then do a masters,,

    how long will this take? im thinking at a guess is it 6 years

    can you do any course as long as it is acredited by the BPS

    how boring will it be?

    what do they do? lol any help appreciated
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    "Applied" Psychology typically means it includes a year in industry; doesn't change the module or degree content.

    Err was about to look up the social psych degree and realised this thread is about 2 years old.. To answer Nadamo's question..

    How do I become an occupational Psychologist?

    * You would need to complete a Society accredited undergraduate degree or conversion course that gives eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Registration (GBR).
    * An MSc in Occupational Psychology.
    * Two years supervised practice under the supervision of a Chartered Occupational Psychologist. This will be assessed by the Division of Occupational Psychology (DOP) following the 'Guidelines to become a Chartered Occupational Psychologist', available to download or request a copy from the Exam team.

    How much would I be paid?

    Ranges of typical starting salaries: £15,000 - £30,000

    Ranges of typical salaries at age 40: £35,000 - £70,000

    Salaries in the private sector or industry can vary from £15,000 to £100,000+. Higher salaries can be found in consultancy work and depend on expertise and length of contract.
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    Yeah, occupational psychologists tend to get paid the most out of all psychologists because they work privately or for corporations (rather than the NHS like me, or prisons like the forensics).

    I suspect their starting salaries are much more than 15k. I know that starting clinical (qualified) salaries are 30k region and I think the occupational psychologists would match that easily.
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    (Original post by Lord Asriel)
    Yeah, occupational psychologists tend to get paid the most out of all psychologists because they work privately or for corporations (rather than the NHS like me, or prisons like the forensics).

    I suspect their starting salaries are much more than 15k. I know that starting clinical (qualified) salaries are 30k region and I think the occupational psychologists would match that easily.
    Clinical Psychs have doctorates, much more than an Occ Psych. and I believe starting is closer to £24k for Clinicals.
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    (Original post by Robbolo)
    Clinical Psychs have doctorates, much more than an Occ Psych. and I believe starting is closer to £24k for Clinicals.
    I would agree more with Lord Asriel on the starting salaries.

    You can't really argue against someone who is actually ON the doctorate course.
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    Hehe, fair enough. Haven't been reading up on Clinical Psych as much as I should have been :p:

    Lord Asriel, may I ask which course you are on?
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    I would agree more with Lord Asriel on the starting salaries.

    You can't really argue against someone who is actually ON the doctorate course.
    so whats your advice about occupational pscyhology being further ahead in experience ( I know your not headed that direction but you probably know more. cheers.
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    (Original post by nadamo)
    so whats your advice about occupational pscyhology being further ahead in experience ( I know your not headed that direction but you probably know more. cheers.
    Sorry, I didn't mean to imply that I was on the doctorate.

    Lord Asriel is, not me.
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    (Original post by Lord Asriel)
    Yeah, occupational psychologists tend to get paid the most out of all psychologists because they work privately or for corporations (rather than the NHS like me, or prisons like the forensics).

    I suspect their starting salaries are much more than 15k. I know that starting clinical (qualified) salaries are 30k region and I think the occupational psychologists would match that easily.
    hey I know you didn't choose the occupational pscyhology path , but as you where closer to making decsions career wise , would occupational pscyhology be just paper pushing, cv assesing and psychosometric tests and the like? , because that would so not suit me and doesn't seem that important than that of the clinical path , cheers
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    Nope. Occupational psychology is far more than human resources stuff (which you mention). Its more hands on about making the workplace better, finding ways of keeping up staff morale and performance and troubleshooting. Read more about it at the BPS website.
 
 
 
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