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    Sorry if there is another thread like this already done, I couldn't find one!

    How are people revising AS chemistry? I am trying to find the most effective way to revise. Are you using past papers? Rewriting notes?

    I am rewriting my notes and looking at the syllabus at my strengths and weaknesses.

    Which way works for you?
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    Basically, the way to do it (IMO), even though it makes you feel really awful about yourself, is to tackle the stuff you're worst at!! I then rewrite those notes, and test myself a few days later... And then gradually do the stuff you think you're better at, and so on.
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    At AS what I did was to write out some notes for each topic in the book. Then Learn them, say 2 topics a day and review it all a week later. Then I went through all of the past papers and made a note of any questions that I was unsure about. I then made some notes on the questions I was unsure about and learnt them. Since the questions tend to be repeated alot (well are very similar) it meant that the exam was quite easy and I felt like doing the exam was very mechanical. It worked aswell, got 100% in both papers (well in UMS at any rate - how I love the UMS system)
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    (Original post by rpotter)
    At AS what I did was to write out some notes for each topic in the book. Then Learn them, say 2 topics a day and review it all a week later. Then I went through all of the past papers and made a note of any questions that I was unsure about. I then made some notes on the questions I was unsure about and learnt them. Since the questions tend to be repeated alot (well are very similar) it meant that the exam was quite easy and I felt like doing the exam was very mechanical. It worked aswell, got 100% in both papers (well in UMS at any rate - how I love the UMS system)
    This is a good method, what I do(am doing) is going through a couple of double spreads in my revision book a day (the black one with the corny jokes in), and then at the end I go through all of the past papers, and any questions I cannot do I look up and remember. If I do the first part correctly then there tends to be very few I need to do in the second part.
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    i have my revision book, notes, and the little pages at the end of the salters student packs (which tell you what you should have in your notes/need to know) all in front of me... and make notes!

    not the most interesting way to use, but ive just been writing summaries of my notes using these for each topic. it goes in a lot better, and i adjust the notes to my needs. (i.e. anything i find super easy, i just mention it, and go into a tad more info to bits im not sure on).

    then i will go onto doing past papers. im leaving them for a little while until ive written my notes. i need to refresh my memory! and i find that writing notes is much more effective for me to revise. the stuff goes in this way!
 
 
 
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Updated: April 16, 2006
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