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    Hi

    Im a second year history student considering what postgraduate courses to apply for next year, I want to move into law once I graduate -Idealy eventually train as a barrister in criminal law. Now now I need your advice on what kind of post graduate training to take. The CPE then the BVC seem to be the most common route, but surely a masters in law is better than the CPE? The CPE has basically been descibed as a law degree in a year whereas a masters is one stage beyond a law degree.

    What is the best route, im aiming to get on the Bar Vocational Course, considering my aim, would I be wasting time and money doing a law masters?
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    I think you confused LPC with CPE (Common Professional Examination). LPC is not a law conversion. It is the solicitor's equivalent of BVC.
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    Yes your right mistake corrected!
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    As a history student you would NEED to do the CPE before the BVC, and hence the CPE would be much more beneficial than a masters!

    The CPE is a law degree in a year and any non-law graduates wishing to go into law -whether it be to become a barrister or solicitor -MUST complete it. The LPC and BVC are more vocational courses and can only be undertaken once the CPE has been completed, except of course if your a law graduate.

    See www.lawcareers.net for further info about conversion etc...
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    (Original post by Hypograde)
    As a history student you would NEED to do the CPE before the BVC, and hence the CPE would be much more beneficial than a masters!

    The CPE is a law degree in a year and any non-law graduates wishing to go into law -whether it be to become a barrister or solicitor -MUST complete it. The LPC and BVC are more vocational courses and can only be undertaken once the CPE has been completed, except of course if your a law graduate.

    See www.lawcareers.net for further info about conversion etc...
    I think OP is torn between the CPE and masters in law which will give non-law grads exemption from CPE (eg. MA in legal studies at Bristol, MJurs at Hull etc).
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    O righty- thanks for informing me - didnt know there was such a course....

    I guess that would potentially be more beneficial if looking to follow the BVC route (due to the academic nature of the barristers profession).
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    (Original post by jeffreyweingard)
    I think OP is torn between the CPE and masters in law which will give non-law grads exemption from CPE (eg. MA in legal studies at Bristol, MJurs at Hull etc).

    I have a quick question. Is the MA in legal studies an actual law degree. For example, the senior-status degree from Bristol is considered a law degree.But is the Bristol one?
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    Yes, it is a qualifying law degree. This means that the core legal content is equivalent to what you'd find on an LLB or GDL. It is a suitable qualification for non-Law graduates who want to go on to do LPC or BVC.
    The advantage of a two year course (compared to GDL) is that it allows a more detailed study of the core subjects rather than a rapid charge through them all. In addition most two-year courses have one or more options, and sometimes a dissertation; you're unlikely to get these on a GDL.
    The disadvantage is that it takes twice as long and (hence) often costs twice as much.
    There are two-year masters courses at Bristol, Bradford, Leeds and Hull. In addition a growing number of universities offer a two-year LLB for graduates. This follows a similar approach, but you will likely share tutorials with freshers - so the content may be pitched at a lower level.

    Anto.
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    If you can afford it, go for it. What must be remembered is that if you are reliant on bank loans then you are not likely to be able to afford three years of a 20K-25K loan; furthermore, the banks usually only allow you to postpone repayment and interest charges for two years worth of study.
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    The two year masters sounds good, but two years feels like a long time and expense. Im tempted to take a one year law masters then apply for the BVC and if it fails Ill take the CPE then reapply for the BVC. I just cant see why a law graduate would be choosen over a non-law graduate with a law masters. I have also looked at the content of many 1 Year law masters and although alot of them offer the chance to take a dissertation many offer the chance to be taught and take exams/write essays on the main areas of law, so im sure I wouldnt be severly lacking in legal knowledge.
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    I have not heard of a 1 year law master degree which is a QLD (qualifying law degree). Please enlighten me and tell me which university is this?
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    I think you may have got mixed up - I don't know of any 1-year Masters degrees in law: they are all 2 years full-time. A one-year post-grad QLD is a GDL/CPE. You would not take both, and you cannot later extend a 1-year course into 2 years as the core content is the same, just one is (even) more compressed & intense while the other allows a bit more time to breathe.

    In the grand scheme of things, one extra year is pretty insignificant: you're already looking at a minimum 4 years for CPE, BVC, and pupillage - and then you might not get tenancy right away.
    Cost is a different matter...I would ask yourself very carefully how much you want to do the course before taking on more debt than you're comfortable with, and only you can answer that one! However MA fees at Sheffield are only ~£2k pa (GDL fees at College of Law are £5.5k-£6.5k), the cost of living there is less than many cities in the south, and you could work some of the middle summer vacation - so it will not necessarily cost you twice as much.

    There is nothing to stop you applying for both when the time comes. The CPE/GLDs are all run through a central clearing system that closes on 1st February, while 2-years courses are applied for direct to the university in the spring like any other masters. So you don't have to decide yet.

    Personally I think the extra time invested is worth it. Why not speak to a few chambers and see what they think...go to a law careers fair armed with good questions, and try to corner someone for a chat.

    Hope this helps a little.

    anto.
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    If you don't have an LLB and you want to practice as a barrister or a solicitor then you'll have to do a 1-year conversion course, THEN the Legal Practice Course [solicitor] or BVC [Bar Vocational Course].

    The most common entry route to the legal profession is:

    LLB --> LPC --> Training Contract = fully qualified solicitor (5 years in total)
    LLB --> BVC --> Pupillage = qualified barrister, practice depending on obtaining a tenancy

    but you could do:

    Any undergrad degree --> Coversion -->LPC/BVC --> Training Contract/Pupillage = Solicitor or barrister.
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    (Original post by RR)
    If you don't have an LLB and you want to practice as a barrister or a solicitor then you'll have to do a 1-year conversion course, THEN the Legal Practice Course [solicitor] or BVC [Bar Vocational Course].

    The most common entry route to the legal profession is:

    LLB --> LPC --> Training Contract = fully qualified solicitor (5 years in total)
    LLB --> BVC --> Pupillage = qualified barrister, practice depending on obtaining a tenancy

    but you could do:

    Any undergrad degree --> Coversion -->LPC/BVC --> Training Contract/Pupillage = Solicitor or barrister.

    RR, s/he is already doing a BA in History; the question is about the difference between doing a 1 year GDL and a 2 year conversion course between BA and BVC.

    anto.
 
 
 
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